1967 Formula One season

The 1967 Formula One season was the 21st season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 18th World Championship of Drivers, the 10th International Cup for F1 Manufacturers, and six non-championship races open to Formula One cars. The World Championship was contested over eleven races between 2 January and 22 October 1967.

New Zealander Denny Hulme won his first and only championship, driving a Brabham-Repco.

Denny Hulme won the Drivers' Championship in a Brabham-Repco.[1] Brabam was also awarded the International Cup for F1 Manufacturers.[2] As of 2023, this is the only championship won by a New Zealand driver. Hulme also became the first driver in World Championship history to win the title without having scored a pole position during the season.

Lorenzo Bandini crashed during the Monaco Grand Prix. Losing an early lead of the race and trying to get back to the front, the Ferrari driver clipped the chicane at the harbour front and then hit a hidden mooring. The car turned over and exploded in flames. It took marshals several minutes to extracate Bandini from the burning wreck and three days later, the Italian passed away. British driver Bob Anderson died during a test at Silverstone. His Brabham slid off the track in wet conditions and hit a marshals post, suffering serious chest and neck injuries and later passing away in hospital.

Teams and drivers edit

The following teams and drivers competed in the 1967 FIA World Championship. A pink background denotes additional Formula 2 entrants to the German Grand Prix on the very long Nürburgring track.

Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Tyre Driver Rounds
  Brabham Racing Organisation Brabham-Repco BT19
BT20
BT24
Repco 620 3.0 V8
Repco 740 3.0 V8
G   Jack Brabham All
  Denny Hulme All
  Cooper Car Company Cooper-Maserati T81
T81B
T86
Maserati 9/F1 3.0 V12
Maserati 10/F1 3.0 V12
F   Jochen Rindt 1–10
  Pedro Rodríguez 1–7, 11
  Alan Rees 6
  Richard Attwood 8
  Jacky Ickx 9–10
  Owen Racing Organisation BRM P83
P261
P115
BRM P75 3.0 H16
BRM P60 2.1 V8
G   Jackie Stewart All
  Mike Spence All
  Team Lotus Lotus-BRM 43
33
BRM P75 3.0 H16
BRM P60 2.1 V8
F   Graham Hill 1–2
  Jim Clark 1
Lotus-Climax 33 Climax FWMV 2.0 V8 2
Lotus-Ford 49 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 3–11
  Graham Hill 3–11
  Eppie Wietzes 8
  Giancarlo Baghetti 9
  Moisés Solana 10–11
48 Ford Cosworth FVA 1.6 L4 F   Jackie Oliver 7
  Anglo American Racers Eagle-Climax T1F Climax FPF 2.8 L4 G   Dan Gurney 1
Eagle-Weslake T1G Weslake 58 3.0 V12 2–11
  Richie Ginther 2
  Bruce McLaren 5–7
  Ludovico Scarfiotti 9
  Honda Racing Honda RA273
RA300
Honda RA273E 3.0 V12 F   John Surtees 1–4, 6–7, 9–11
  Rob Walker/Jack Durlacher Racing Team Cooper-Maserati T81 Maserati 9/F1 3.0 V12 F   Jo Siffert All
  DW Racing Enterprises Brabham-Climax BT11 Climax FPF 2.8 L4 F
D
  Bob Anderson 1–6
  Joakim Bonnier Racing Team Cooper-Maserati T81 Maserati 9/F1 3.0 V12 F   Jo Bonnier 1, 4, 6–11
  Reg Parnell Racing Lotus-BRM 25 BRM P60 2.1 V8 F
D
G
  Piers Courage 1
  Chris Irwin 3
BRM P261
P83
BRM P60 2.1 V8
BRM P75 3.0 H16
  Piers Courage 2, 6
  Chris Irwin 4–11
  John Love Cooper-Climax T79 Climax FPF 2.8 L4 D   John Love 1
  Sam Tingle LDS-Climax Mk 3 Climax FPF 2.8 L4 D   Sam Tingle 1
  Scuderia Scribante Brabham-Climax BT11 Climax FPF 2.8 L4 F   Dave Charlton 1
  Luki Botha Brabham-Climax BT11 Climax FPF 2.8 L4 D   Luki Botha 1
  Matra Sports Matra-Ford MS5
MS7
Ford Cosworth FVA 1.6 L4 D
G
  Jean-Pierre Beltoise 2, 10–11
  Johnny Servoz-Gavin 2
  Bruce McLaren Motor Racing McLaren-BRM M4B
M5A
BRM P111 2.1 V8
BRM P101 3.0 V12
G   Bruce McLaren 2–3, 8–11
  Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312/66
312/67
Ferrari 242 3.0 V12 F   Lorenzo Bandini 2
  Chris Amon 2–11
  Mike Parkes 3–4
  Ludovico Scarfiotti 3–4
  Jonathan Williams 11
  Guy Ligier Cooper-Maserati T81 Maserati 9/F1 3.0 V12 F   Guy Ligier 4–5
Brabham-Repco BT20 Repco 620 3.0 V8 6–7, 9–11
  Bernard White Racing BRM P261 BRM P60 2.1 V8 G   David Hobbs 6, 8
  Charles Vögele Racing Cooper-ATS T77 ATS 2.7 V8 D   Silvio Moser 6
  Bayerische Motoren Werke AG Lola-BMW T100 BMW M10 2.0 L4 D   Hubert Hahne 7
  Gerhard Mitter Brabham-Ford BT23 Ford Cosworth FVA 1.6 L4 D   Gerhard Mitter 7
  Roy Winkelmann Racing Brabham-Ford BT23 Ford Cosworth FVA 1.6 L4 F   Alan Rees 7
  Ecurie Ford-France Matra-Ford MS5 Ford Cosworth FVA 1.6 L4 D   Jo Schlesser 7
  Ron Harris Racing Team Protos-Ford F2 Ford Cosworth FVA 1.6 L4 F   Brian Hart 7
  Kurt Ahrens Jr. 7
  Lola Cars Lola-BMW T100 BMW M10 2.0 L4 F   David Hobbs 7
  David Bridges Lola-Ford T100 Ford Cosworth FVA 1.6 L4 D   Brian Redman 7
  Tyrrell Racing Organisation Matra-Ford MS5 Ford Cosworth FVA 1.6 L4 D   Jacky Ickx 7
  Mike Fisher Lotus-BRM 33 BRM P60 2.1 V8 F   Mike Fisher 8, 11
  Castrol Oils Ltd Eagle-Climax T1F Climax FPF 2.8 L4 G   Al Pease 8
  Tom Jones Cooper-Climax T82 Climax FWMV 2.0 V8 F   Tom Jones 8

Team and driver changes edit

Mid-season changes edit

Calendar edit

Round Grand Prix Circuit Date
1   South African Grand Prix Kyalami Grand Prix Circuit, Midrand 2 January
2   Monaco Grand Prix Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo 7 May
3   Dutch Grand Prix Circuit Zandvoort, Zandvoort 4 June
4   Belgian Grand Prix Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot 18 June
5   French Grand Prix Bugatti Circuit, Le Mans 2 July
6   British Grand Prix Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone 15 July
7   German Grand Prix Nürburgring, Nürburg 6 August
8   Canadian Grand Prix Mosport Park, Bowmanville 27 August
9   Italian Grand Prix Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Monza 10 September
10   United States Grand Prix Watkins Glen International, New York 1 October
11   Mexican Grand Prix Magdalena Mixhuca, Mexico City 22 October

Calendar changes edit

Regulation changes edit

After Lorenzo Bandini's fatal accident, the FIA banned circuit organisers from using straw bales along the track[3] and TV crews from flying their helicopters too low, as both had contributed to the fire flaring up.

Championship report edit

Rounds 1 to 4 edit

Coming down from his third World Championship in 1966, Jack Brabham started this year off as well, with a pole position at the South African Grand Prix. Teammate Denny Hulme started second and two-time World Champion Jim Clark lined up in third in his Lotus. Hulme took the lead at the start, while Clark fell back to sixth. In a race of attrition, the crowd saw Rhodesian driver John Love take the lead. When he had to stop for extra fuel, however, it was Pedro Rodríguez who won in his Cooper. Love finished second, ahead of John Surtees in a Honda. Hulme and Brabham finished several laps down but still in the points, since there were just six classified finishers in total.[4]

From 1967 to 1969, there was four months between the first and second race of the championship, and most teams would usually run the first race with old designs, or not even participate. This year, Ferrari, McLaren and Matra started their year with the Monaco Grand Prix. Lotus had planned to run revolutionary new Cosworths, but they were not ready in time. Jack Brabham scored pole position like in South Africa, but again lost the lead at the start, this time to long-time Ferrari driver Lorenzo Bandini. Before long, Hulme took over at the front and increased his lead to 15 seconds. Desperately trying to get closer, Bandini struck the barrier in the chicane at the harbour front and mounted the straw bales. The car landed upside down and exploded in flames. Bandini would succumbed to his injuries three days later. Hulme won the race, one lap ahead of Graham Hill (Lotus) and two ahead of Chris Amon (Ferrari). Like in the first race, there were just six finishers.[5]

 
Jim Clark, on his way to win the Dutch Grand Prix

When Lotus could finally run the new Cosworth engines in the Dutch Grand Prix, their pace was significantly better than before and Hill snatched pole position. A surprising Dan Gurney in the Eagle started second, reigning champion Brabham in third. After drivers had to avoid a wandering marshal on the grid, the positions at the front remained rather the same, until Gurney made a pit stop. Hill's engine suddenly seized on lap 11, but teammate Clark was charging, getting up to second on lap 15 and taking the lead from Brabham on the next lap. He kept increasing his lead with a second per lap and easily won, ahead of the teammates Brabham and Hulme. Behind them finished the three Ferraris.[6]

Qualifying for the Belgian Grand Prix ended up with quite the same drivers at the front, except Brabham could only manage seventh. Clark, Gurney and Hill occupied the front row. Clark was the only one of the three with a good start, however. During the first lap, Mike Parkes crashed his Ferrari and was thrown out. He broke a leg and wrist and would not return to Formula One. At the front of the field, Clark was followed by Stewart (BRM) and Amon (Ferrari), before Amon fell back and Gurney took third. Then, Clark had to pit to change a spark plug and Stewart ran into trouble with his gearbox, and Gurney took the lead. After setting a new lap record, the American driver won, over a minute ahead of Stewart and Amon.[7]

Four different winners led to a close fight at the top of the Drivers' Championship. Denny Hulme (Brabham) was first with 16 points, ahead of Pedro Rodríguez (Cooper) and Chris Amon (Ferrari) with 11. In the battle for the Manufacturers' Cup, Brabham had scored 18 points, ahead of Cooper (14) and Ferrari (11).

Rounds 5 to 7 edit

For the French Grand Prix, the front row consisted of 1962 champion Graham Hill (Lotus), triple World Champion Jack Brabham (Brabham) and winner of the last race, Dan Gurney (Eagle). But after just 5 laps, it was fourth-starting Jim Clark who led the field. Before the race reached half distance, however, both Lotuses had retired. The Cosworth engines deemed fast but unreliable. After Gurney retired as well with a fuel leak, which left Brabham and his teammate Hulme to finish first and second. Jackie Stewart finished third in his BRM, a lap down on the leader. For the third time this year, there were just six classified finishers.[8]

The British Grand Prix was run at Silverstone and saw the green-and-yellow Lotuses (Clark ahead of Hill) qualifying in front of the green-and-gold Brabhams (Brabham ahead of Hulme). The Lotus duo gained a big lead over the rest, before Hill took the lead on lap 26. When a screw in his suspension failed, however, he had to pit on lap 55, and his engine seized ten laps later. Clark took a comfortable win, ahead of Hulme and Amon, the Ferrari driver having passed Brabham four laps from the end.[9]

During practice for the German Grand Prix, Hill crashed and wrote off his Lotus, while escaping uninjured. Clark clinched pole position, ahead of Hulme and Formula Two driver Jacky Ickx. (Traditionally, the F2 race would be run at the same time as the Grand Prix. F2 drivers would not be eligible to score points for the F1 championship.) At the start, Clark and Hulme led away, with Bruce McLaren stealing third. On lap 3, Clark's right-rear wheel was deflating slowly and he had to back off. Dan Gurney inherited the lead after McLaren retired with an oil leak. The American set a new lap record, despite an extra chicane having been added to the circuit, and increased his lead over Hulme to over 40 seconds. On lap 13, however, his Eagle's drive shaft broke and cut through an oil pipe, handing Hulme a lucky victory, ahead of teammate Brabham and Ferrari driver Amon.[10]

In the Drivers' Championship, Denny Hulme (Brabham) was leading with 37 points, ahead of Jack Brabham (Brabham) with 25 points and Jim Clark (Lotus) and Chris Amon (Ferrari) in a shared third place with 19 points. Brabham was leading the championship for the Manufacturers' Cup with 42 points, ahead of Coopper with 21 and Lotus and Ferrari in a shared third place with 19 points.

Rounds 8 to 11 edit

The Canadian Grand Prix was on the championship calendar for the first time and was supposed to be a one-off in celebration of Canada's 100 years of independence, but the popularity of the event would result in F1 returning to Mosport Park seven more years and the Canadian GP still being featured on the calendar today. Jim Clark (Lotus) qualified on pole position, ahead of teammate Graham Hill and championship leader Denny Hulme (Brabham). It had been a rainy night, but a clear morning, which led to most of the Goodyear runners starting on intermediate tyres, while most of the Firestone started on dries. During the warm-up lap, the rain returned and it caused a treacherous first lap, with the Goodyear times at an advantage. Hulme took the lead off of Clark, and Bruce McLaren got by the pole-sitter into second place. The track was now drying and around a quarter of the race, the dry-runners regained their advantage. Clark retook second place and began to catch Hulme at over a second a lap. On lap 58, he was there and immediately went by into the lead, but right at that moment, the rain returned. Clark's engine got soaked and cut out, while Hulme desperatly needed clean goggles so chose to pit. This left Jack Brabham, second in the championship, free to win the race, over a minute ahead of teammate Hulme and at least a lap ahead of the race. Dan Gurney finished third in the Eagle.[11]

Qualifying for the Italian Grand Prix was disrupted by rain, but the result was not surprising: Clark scored his fifth pole position of the year, ahead of Brabham and McLaren. Hulme started in sixth. The marshal starting the race used a different procedure to what the drivers were used to, which led to half of the grid essentially doing a false start, but no penalties were issued. Brabham took the lead before Gurney grabbed it later in the lap, while Hill and Clark followed them. On lap 3, Clark was already back in the lead, but then suffered a slow puncture. With the pole-sitter in the pits and Gurney's engine having broken, as it had done so many times, it was Hulme who took over the lead. Brabham and Hill formed a close trio with him and the lead swapped hands a couple of times. Clark had a lost a full lap with his pit stop, but managed to unlap himself with two thirds of the race still to go, and quickly set a new lap record. Hulme retired with an overheating engine and Hill took advantage from Clark's slipstream to open up the gap to Brabham at two seconds per lap, until on lap 58, his engine exploded. His rivals' retirements, topped with his maniacal pace, brought Clark up to second place, with leader Brabham in his sights and Honda driver John Surtees in third place, the 1964 champion this time being the one to benefit from Clark's tow. On lap 60, Clark grabbed the lead and gained a three-second advantage, until he dramatically ran out of fuel. Surtees took the lead and was side-by-side with Brabham going into the last corner. Brabham dove to the inside but slid wide. Surtees crossed back and took the flag with a margin of just 0.2 seconds. It would be Honda's last win until 2006. Clark coasted over the line in third place.[12]

 
Jim Clark, on his way to win the United States Grand Prix

The Brabham duo (Hulme and Brabham) were leading the championship but the Lotus duo (Hill and Clark) that occupied the first row for the United States Grand Prix. Gurney had started beside them, took second place at the start and even started pressuring the leader. After just 24 laps, however, the home hero retired with a broken suspension, but the Lotuses were showing better pace anyway. Clark took over the lead when Hill suffered issues with his clutch. This gave Ferrari driver Chris Amon a chance for second place, but his engine ran out of oil with 12 laps to go. Clark would take a comfortable victory, but two laps from the end, his right-rear suspension broke. By slowing down and managing to keep the car on track, Hill could not catch up in time, and Clark took the chequered flag. One could say it was the summary of the season: the Lotuses were unreliable and finished less than half of the races, but if they did, they were so fast that they lapped the rest of the field. This time, it was Hulme who finished in third, a lap down.[13]

Going into the final race, the Mexican Grand Prix, Hulme had a lead of five points in the standings, so if Brabham wanted to do anything about it, he needed to win and for his teammate to finish fifth or lower. Clark started again on pole position, with Brabham and Hulme down in fifth and sixth, respectively. Hill shortly took the lead, but Clark grabbed it back and grew his advantage to seven seconds. Hulme was comfortably hanging back six seconds behind Brabham. Hill retired when his drive shaft broke and had damaged his engine, and the race settled down. Clark set a new lap record and lapped everyone but Brabham in second. Hulme finished third, enough to win the title.[14]

Denny Hulme (Brabham, 51 points) won his first and only championship, ahead of teammate Jack Brabham (46) and Jim Clark (Lotus, 41). Hulme is the only champion to date from New Zealand, and the first of two drivers to win the title without achieving a pole position in the season. Only Niki Lauda would repeat this feat in 1984. The Brabham team (63 points) also won the Manufacturers' Cup, ahead of Lotus (44) and Cooper (28).

Results and standings edit

Grands Prix edit

Round Grand Prix Pole position Fastest lap Winning driver Winning constructor Tyre Report
1   South African Grand Prix   Jack Brabham   Denny Hulme   Pedro Rodríguez   Cooper-Maserati F Report
2   Monaco Grand Prix   Jack Brabham   Jim Clark   Denny Hulme   Brabham-Repco G Report
3   Dutch Grand Prix   Graham Hill   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Lotus-Ford F Report
4   Belgian Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Dan Gurney   Dan Gurney   Eagle-Weslake G Report
5   French Grand Prix   Graham Hill   Graham Hill   Jack Brabham   Brabham-Repco G Report
6   British Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Denny Hulme   Jim Clark   Lotus-Ford F Report
7   German Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Dan Gurney   Denny Hulme   Brabham-Repco G Report
8   Canadian Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Jack Brabham   Brabham-Repco G Report
9   Italian Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   John Surtees   Honda F Report
10   United States Grand Prix   Graham Hill   Graham Hill   Jim Clark   Lotus-Ford F Report
11   Mexican Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Lotus-Ford F Report

World Drivers' Championship standings edit

 
New Zealander Denny Hulme (pictured in 1973) won the Drivers' Championship, driving for Brabham
 
Jack Brabham (pictured in 1966) placed second driving for his own team, Brabham
 
Jim Clark (pictured in 1966) placed third, driving for Lotus.

Championship points were awarded on a 9–6–4–3–2–1 basis to the first six finishers in each round. Only the best five results from the first six races and the best four results from the last five races could be retained by each driver.[15]

Pos. Driver RSA
 
MON
 
NED
 
BEL
 
FRA
 
GBR
 
GER
 
CAN
 
ITA
 
USA
 
MEX
 
Pts.[16]
1   Denny Hulme 4 1 3 Ret 2 2 1 2 Ret 3 3 51
2   Jack Brabham 6 Ret 2 Ret 1 4 2 1 2 (5) 2 46 (48)
3   Jim Clark Ret Ret 1 6 Ret 1 Ret Ret 3 1 1 41
4   John Surtees 3 Ret Ret Ret 6 4 1 Ret 4 20
5   Chris Amon 3 4 3 Ret 3 3 6 7 Ret 9 20
6   Pedro Rodríguez 1 5 Ret 9 6 5 11 6 15
7   Graham Hill Ret 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 4 Ret 2 Ret 15
8   Dan Gurney Ret Ret Ret 1 Ret Ret Ret 3 Ret Ret Ret 13
9   Jackie Stewart Ret Ret Ret 2 3 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 10
10   Mike Spence Ret 6 8 5 Ret Ret Ret 5 5 Ret 5 9
11   John Love 2 6
12   Jo Siffert Ret Ret 10 7 4 Ret Ret DNS Ret 4 12 6
13   Jochen Rindt Ret Ret Ret 4 Ret Ret Ret Ret 4 Ret 6
14   Bruce McLaren 4 Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret 3
15   Jo Bonnier Ret Ret Ret 6 8 Ret 6 10 3
16   Chris Irwin 7 Ret 5 7 9 Ret Ret Ret Ret 2
17   Bob Anderson 5 DNQ 9 8 Ret Ret 2
18   Mike Parkes 5 Ret 2
19   Guy Ligier 10 NC 10 8 Ret Ret 11 1
20   Ludovico Scarfiotti 6 NC Ret 1
21   Jacky Ickx Ret1 6 Ret 1
  Jean-Pierre Beltoise DNQ 7 7 0
  David Hobbs 8 101 9 0
  Jonathan Williams 8 0
  Alan Rees 9 71 0
  Richard Attwood 10 0
  Mike Fisher 11 DNS 0
  Dave Charlton NC 0
  Luki Botha NC 0
  Al Pease NC 0
  Piers Courage Ret Ret DNS 0
  Moisés Solana Ret Ret 0
  Sam Tingle Ret 0
  Lorenzo Bandini Ret† 0
  Johnny Servoz-Gavin Ret 0
  Silvio Moser Ret 0
  Hubert Hahne Ret 0
  Giancarlo Baghetti Ret 0
  Eppie Wietzes DSQ 0
  Tom Jones DNQ 0
  Richie Ginther DNQ 0
Drivers ineligible for Formula One points, because they drove with Formula Two cars
  Jackie Oliver 5
  Brian Hart NC
  Kurt Ahrens Jr. Ret
  Jo Schlesser Ret
  Gerhard Mitter Ret
  Brian Redman DNS
Pos. Driver RSA
 
MON
 
NED
 
BEL
 
FRA
 
GBR
 
GER
 
CAN
 
ITA
 
USA
 
MEX
 
Pts.
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver Second place
Bronze Third place
Green Other points position
Blue Other classified position
Not classified, finished (NC)
Purple Not classified, retired (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Did not pre-qualify (DNPQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Race cancelled (C)
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)
Withdrawn (WD)
Did not enter (cell empty)
Text formatting Meaning
Bold Pole position
Italics Fastest lap


  • 1 – Ineligible for Formula One points, because they drove with Formula Two cars.

International Cup for F1 Manufacturers standings edit

Points were awarded on a 9–6–4–3–2–1 basis to the first six finishers at each round, however only the best placed car from each manufacturer was eligible to score points. Only the best five results from the first six rounds and the best four results from the last five rounds were retained.

Pos. Manufacturer RSA
 
MON
 
NED
 
BEL
 
FRA
 
GBR
 
GER
 
CAN
 
ITA
 
USA
 
MEX
 
Pts.[16]
1   Brabham-Repco 4 1 2 Ret 1 2 1 1 2 (3) 2 63 (67)
2   Lotus-Ford 1 6 Ret 1 Ret 4 3 1 1 44
3   Cooper-Maserati 1 5 10 4 4 5 6 8 4 4 6 28
4   Honda 3 Ret Ret Ret 6 4 1 Ret 4 20
5   Ferrari 3 4 3 Ret 3 3 6 7 Ret 8 20
6   BRM Ret 6 8 2 3 7 9 5 5 Ret 5 17
7   Eagle-Weslake Ret Ret 1 Ret Ret Ret 3 Ret Ret Ret 13
8   Lotus-BRM Ret 2 7 11 DNS 6
9   Cooper-Climax 2 DNQ 6
10   McLaren-BRM 4 Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret 3
11   Brabham-Climax 5 DNQ 9 8 Ret Ret 2
  Matra-Ford Ret 7 7 0
  Eagle-Climax Ret NC 0
  LDS-Climax Ret 0
  Lotus-Climax Ret 0
  Cooper-ATS Ret 0
  Lola-BMW Ret 0
Pos. Manufacturer RSA
 
MON
 
NED
 
BEL
 
FRA
 
GBR
 
GER
 
CAN
 
ITA
 
USA
 
MEX
 
Pts.
  • Bold results counted to championship totals.

Non-championship races edit

Other Formula One races held in 1967, which did not count towards the World Championship.

Race name Circuit Date Winning driver Constructor Report
  II Race of Champions Brands Hatch 12 March   Dan Gurney   Eagle-Weslake Report
  I Spring Cup Oulton Park 15 April   Jack Brabham   Brabham-Repco Report
  XIX BRDC International Trophy Silverstone 29 April   Mike Parkes   Ferrari Report
  XVI Gran Premio di Siracusa Syracuse 21 May   Mike Parkes
  Ludovico Scarfiotti
  Ferrari Report
  XIV International Gold Cup Oulton Park 16 September   Jack Brabham   Brabham-Repco Report
  XV Spanish Grand Prix Jarama 12 November   Jim Clark   Lotus-Ford Report

Notes and references edit

  1. ^ "1967 Driver Standings". Formula1.com. Retrieved 28 March 2024.
  2. ^ "1967 Constructor Standings". Formula1.com. Retrieved 28 March 2024.
  3. ^ Anna Duxbury (25 November 2021). "History of safety devices in Formula 1: The halo, barriers & more". Autosport. Retrieved 20 March 2024.
  4. ^ Michael Tee (2 January 1967). "1967 South African Grand Prix race report: Heartbreak for Love". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 3 December 2023. Retrieved 20 March 2024.
  5. ^ Denis Jenkinson (7 May 1967). "1967 Monaco Grand Prix race report: Hulme the victor on black day". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 26 September 2023. Retrieved 20 March 2024.
  6. ^ Denis Jenkinson (4 June 1967). "1967 Dutch Grand Prix race report: Lotus back in business". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 21 May 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2024.
  7. ^ Denis Jenkinson (18 June 1967). "1967 Belgian Grand Prix race report: Gurney's Eagle takes flight". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 28 November 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2024.
  8. ^ Denis Jenkinson (2 July 1967). "1967 French Grand Prix race report: Brabham conquers Le Mans". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 31 July 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2024.
  9. ^ Bill Boddy (15 July 1967). "1967 British Grand Prix race report - Team Lotus Dominate". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 7 May 2021. Retrieved 20 March 2024.
  10. ^ Denis Jenkinson (6 August 1967). "1967 German Grand Prix race report: Brabham shows its steel". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 9 June 2023. Retrieved 20 March 2024.
  11. ^ Michael Tee (27 August 1967). "1967 Canadian Grand Prix report: Brabham again supreme". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 16 February 2024. Retrieved 21 March 2024.
  12. ^ Denis Jenkinson (10 September 1967). "1967 Italian Grand Prix report: Surtees wins as heroic Clark denied". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 16 February 2024. Retrieved 21 March 2024.
  13. ^ Michael Tee (1 October 1967). "1967 United State Grand Prix race report: Lotus lights up the Glen". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 31 May 2023. Retrieved 21 March 2024.
  14. ^ Motor Sport (22 October 1967). "1967 Mexican Grand Prix race report: Denny reaches the top". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 4 June 2023. Retrieved 21 March 2024.
  15. ^ "FIA Motor Sport Bulletin N° 5 – November 1967" (PDF). historicdb.fia.com.
  16. ^ a b Only the best 5 results from the first 6 rounds and the best 4 results from the last 5 rounds counted towards the championship. Numbers without parentheses are championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.

External links edit