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Alan Rees (racing driver)

Alan Rees (born 12 January 1938 in Langstone, Newport, Monmouthshire)[1] is a British former racing driver from Wales. He participated in three World Championship Grands Prix in the 1960s, although two of those appearances were driving Formula 2 cars. He scored no championship points. His best result was seventh place (second in the Formula Two class) in the 1967 German Grand Prix.[2]

Alan Rees
Born (1938-01-12) 12 January 1938 (age 81)
Formula One World Championship career
NationalityUnited Kingdom British
Active years1966-1967
TeamsCooper, non-works Brabham
Entries3
Championships0
Wins0
Podiums0
Career points0
Pole positions0
Fastest laps0
First entry1966 German Grand Prix
Last entry1967 German Grand Prix

Rees drove for the works Lotus Formula Junior team in 1962, and won three races before a crash at the Nürburgring 1000 km sports car race ended his season.[3] From 1963 to 1968, he drove for the Roy Winklemann Racing team in Formula Two and frequently achieved victories over experienced drivers such as Jackie Stewart and Jochen Rindt.[3]

Formula One team managementEdit

In 1969 Rees co-founded March Engineering; his initials being the "AR" in "March", alongside Max Mosley, Graham Coaker and Robin Herd. At the end of 1971 he moved to a Shadow Racing Cars where he became team principal. In 1977 he left Shadow to co-found Arrows.[4]. In 1996 he and the other remaining founders sold Arrows to Tom Walkinshaw.

Complete Formula One World Championship resultsEdit

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 WDC Points
1966 Roy Winkelmann Racing Brabham BT18 (F2) Cosworth
Straight-4 1.0L
MON BEL FRA GBR NED GER
Ret
ITA USA MEX NC 0
1967 Cooper Car Company Cooper T81 Maserati V12 RSA MON NED BEL FRA GBR
9
NC 0
Roy Winkelmann Racing Brabham BT23 (F2) Cosworth
Straight-4 1.6L
GER
7
CAN ITA USA MEX
Source:[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jenkins, Richard. "The World Championship drivers - Where are they now?". OldRacingCars.com. Retrieved 2007-07-29.
  2. ^ a b Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 309. ISBN 0851127029.
  3. ^ a b Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 308. ISBN 0851127029.
  4. ^ Henry, Alan. "Me and my Arrows". Motor Sport Magazine (February 2003): 62. Retrieved 7 February 2019.