Tynset is a municipality in Innlandet county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Østerdalen. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Tynset. Other villages in Tynset include Fådalen, Fåset, Telneset, Tylldalen, and Yset.

Tynset kommune
View of the Tylldalen area
View of the Tylldalen area
Flag of Tynset kommune
Coat of arms of Tynset kommune
Official logo of Tynset kommune
Tynset within Innlandet
Tynset within Innlandet
Coordinates: 62°16′31″N 10°49′57″E / 62.27528°N 10.83250°E / 62.27528; 10.83250Coordinates: 62°16′31″N 10°49′57″E / 62.27528°N 10.83250°E / 62.27528; 10.83250
CountryNorway
CountyInnlandet
DistrictØsterdalen
Established1 Jan 1838
 • Created asFormannskapsdistrikt
Administrative centreTynset
Government
 • Mayor (2015)Merete Myhre Moen (Sp)
Area
 • Total1,880.32 km2 (726.00 sq mi)
 • Land1,822.51 km2 (703.68 sq mi)
 • Water57.81 km2 (22.32 sq mi)  3.1%
 • Rank#43 in Norway
Population
 (2022)
 • Total5,581
 • Rank#167 in Norway
 • Density3.1/km2 (8/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
Increase +0.3%
DemonymTynseting[1]
Official language
 • Norwegian formNeutral
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-3427
WebsiteOfficial website

The 1,880-square-kilometre (730 sq mi) municipality is the 43rd largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Tynset is the 167th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 5,581. The municipality's population density is 3.1 inhabitants per square kilometre (8.0/sq mi) and its population has increased by 0.3% over the previous 10-year period.[3][4]

General informationEdit

The parish of Tønsæt was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt law). In 1864, the southern part of the municipality (population: 3,216) was separated to form the new municipality of Lille-Elvdal. This left Tynset with 2,975 residents. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1966, the neighboring municipality of Kvikne was dissolved and on that date the southern part of Kvikne (population: 664) was merged into Tynset municipality. On 1 January 1970, the Garlia farm (population: 5) was transferred from Tynset to the neighboring Rennebu Municipality (which also meant switching from Hedmark county to Sør-Trøndelag county). On 1 January 1984, the unpopulated Spekedalen area was transferred from Tynset to the neighboring Rendalen Municipality.[5]

NameEdit

The municipality (originally the parish) is named after the old Tynset farm (Old Norse: Tunnusetr), since the first Tynset Church was built here. The first element is the genitive case of the river name Tunna (now spelled Tonna). The last element of the name derives from the word setr which means "homestead" or "farm". (The meaning of the river name is unknown.)[6] Prior to 1918, the name was written "Tønset" and it was pronounced Teunset with the "eu" diphthong equivalent to that in the French word bleu).

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms was granted on 18 October 1985. The arms show the silver/gray head of a moose on a blue background. It was chosen to symbolize the abundance of moose in the area.[7]

ChurchesEdit

The Church of Norway has four parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Tynset. It is part of the Nord-Østerdal prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Hamar.

Churches in Tynset
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Brydalen Brydalen Church Brydalen 1883
Kvikne Kvikne Church Yset 1654
Tylldalen Tylldalen Church Tylldalen 1736
Tynset Tynset Church Tynset 1795

GeographyEdit

 
Tynset seen from northwest

Tynset is the urban centre for the northern Østerdalen part of Innlandet county in the central area of mainland Norway. Tynset lies in the upper quadrant of Norway's longest valley, Østerdalen at an elevation of approximately 480 metres (1,574.8 ft) above sea level. To the northeast lies the municipality of Tolga; south of Tynset are Rendalen and Alvdal municipalities; and to the west is Folldal municipality. In the neighboring county of Trøndelag, Tynset is bordered to the north by the municipalities of Rennebu and Midtre Gauldal, and to the west by Oppdal municipality.

Tynset is known for its vast areas of forest and mountain, which are ideal for skiing, walking, cycling, hunting, and fishing. In many areas are signposted paths and ski tracks are ploughed in winter. The river Glåma has several side rivers including the Sivilla and Ya. The Fådalen valley and the lake Savalen have many tourist activities. The lakes Innerdalsvatnet and Falningsjøen also lie in the municipality.

Tynset has many wildlife areas including the geological formation at Ripan and Gammeldalen. At Ripan, there is a lake formed by glaciation during the last ice age and at Gammeldalen there are some beautifully formed corries from the same period.

Tynset has many historic mountain farms (seter) that are still in use in the high parts of the countryside. It is possible to visit these farms while hiking. Tynset municipality also rents chalets, which used to belong to some of these mountain farms.

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Tynset, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elects a mayor.[8] The municipality falls under the Østre Innlandet District Court and the Eidsivating Court of Appeal.

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Tynset is made up of 27 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Tynset Kommunestyre 2020–2023 [9]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)14
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 2016–2019 [10][11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Pensioners' Party (Pensjonistpartiet)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)12
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 2012–2015 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)8
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
 Tynset List free voters (Tynsetlista frie velgere)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 2008–2011 [11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)10
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
 Tynset List free voters (Tynsetlista frie velgere)6
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 2004–2007 [11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)14
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 2000–2003 [11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)12
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1996–1999 [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)12
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1992–1995 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)11
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1988–1991 [15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1984–1987 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1980–1983 [17]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1976–1979 [18]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)12
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1972–1975 [19]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)11
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1968–1971 [20]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)12
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:27
Tynset Kommunestyre 1964–1967 [21]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
 List of workers, fishermen, and small farmholders
(Arbeidere, fiskere, småbrukere liste)
3
Total number of members:21
Tynset Herredsstyre 1960–1963 [22]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)10
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:21
Tynset Herredsstyre 1956–1959 [23]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)11
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:21
Tynset Herredsstyre 1952–1955 [24]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)7
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)7
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:16
Tynset Herredsstyre 1948–1951 [25]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)7
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)8
Total number of members:16
Tynset Herredsstyre 1945–1947 [26]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)2
Total number of members:16
Tynset Herredsstyre 1938–1941* [27]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)3
Total number of members:16
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

MayorsEdit

This is a list of the mayors of Tynset since it was established on 1 January 1838.[28]

ClimateEdit

Tynset has a boreal climate (continental subarctic climate). Situated inland on the valley floor at 480 meter altitude and sheltered by mountain ranges, Tynset can see strong inversion for long periods. The all-time low is −46.6 °C (−51.9 °F) from 1 February 1912, (Tynset-Åkrann),[29] and the January record low is −46.1 °C (−51.0 °F) from 1 January 1979.[30] In the European cold snap of January 2010 Tynset recorded low of −42.4 °C (−44.3 °F). Tynset has recorded the coldest June low for a town in mainland Norway with −7.9 °C (17.8 °F) on 1 June 1907. The all-time high is 31.4 °C (88.5 °F) recorded 25 June 2020, while July has seen 31.3 °C (88.3 °F) on 27 July 2008. Tynset sees sparse precipitation with only 440 mm (17.3 in) annually, with February - April as the driest season.

Climate data for Tynset 1991-2020 (482 m)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) −6
(21)
−3
(27)
2
(36)
7
(45)
12
(54)
17
(63)
19
(66)
18
(64)
13
(55)
6
(43)
−1
(30)
−6
(21)
7
(44)
Daily mean °C (°F) −9.1
(15.6)
−8.6
(16.5)
−4
(25)
1.5
(34.7)
6.3
(43.3)
10.4
(50.7)
13.7
(56.7)
11.9
(53.4)
7.5
(45.5)
1
(34)
−3.7
(25.3)
−9.5
(14.9)
1.5
(34.6)
Average low °C (°F) −14
(7)
−12
(10)
−10
(14)
−4
(25)
1
(34)
5
(41)
8
(46)
7
(45)
3
(37)
−1
(30)
−6
(21)
−13
(9)
−3
(27)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 28.2
(1.11)
22.2
(0.87)
19
(0.7)
18.1
(0.71)
38.1
(1.50)
55
(2.2)
66.9
(2.63)
68.4
(2.69)
37
(1.5)
30.8
(1.21)
28.8
(1.13)
27.3
(1.07)
439.8
(17.32)
Source 1: [1]
Source 2: [2]
Climate data for Tynset 1961-1990
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) −9
(16)
−4
(24)
2
(35)
7
(44)
12
(53)
16
(61)
17
(63)
17
(62)
12
(53)
6
(43)
−2
(29)
−5
(23)
6
(42)
Average low °C (°F) −18
(−1)
−15
(5)
−12
(10)
−3
(26)
0
(32)
5
(41)
6
(43)
6
(43)
2
(36)
−2
(29)
−8
(18)
−14
(7)
−4
(24)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 18
(0.7)
15
(0.6)
7.6
(0.3)
10
(0.4)
38
(1.5)
84
(3.3)
86
(3.4)
81
(3.2)
28
(1.1)
18
(0.7)
13
(0.5)
15
(0.6)
410
(16.1)
Source: Weatherbase [31]

TransportationEdit

 
Tynset railway station

The municipality can be reached via railroad, road, and air. The main Norwegian National Road 3 runs through the municipality (it is the shortest route between the cities of Oslo and Trondheim). The Rondevegen road connects Tynset to Lillehammer (to the south), Røros (to the northeast), and continues further into Sweden. County Road 30, which passes through Rendalen, also continues through Tynset into Sweden. The Rørosbanen railway line connects Tynset with the major cities of Oslo and Trondheim. Røros Airport, 55 kilometres (34.2 mi) away, is part of the national network. Tynset also hosts an aerodrome that is used by smaller aircraft.

KickersEdit

 
Giant kicker in Tynset Square

Tynset produces the traditional Norwegian form of transportation, the "kicker" (spark). It is made in two versions: Rappen and Tarzan. The world's largest kicker is located in the Tynset Square in the village of Tynset. This sculpture is four times the size of a normal kicker.

EconomyEdit

With a population of about 5,400 people, Tynset is the urban centre of the Nord-Østerdalen region. Although it is a modern business and shopping centre with a wide variety of commercial activities, agriculture and forestry are still the traditional ways of making a living. Municipal administration and service industries, such as the computer industry, law, finance, and construction are also beginning to play an increasing role. Tynset has most of the functions of a regional centre because of its schools and hospital, and many of the region's intermunicipal services have naturally been positioned in Tynset: The Family Centre, Centre for School Psychology, and others. A factory in Tynset used to produce latex Troll souvenirs, but production moved abroad and it no longer does this.

CultureEdit

Number of minorities (1st and 2nd generation) in Tynset by country of origin in 2017[32]
Ancestry Number
  Poland 125
  Lithuania 91
  Somalia 77
  Eritrea 45
  Thailand 37
  Afghanistan 36
  Syria 34

Tynset has a rich cultural life with a huge range of organisations in sports, music, drama, the arts, and youth work.

Kulturhuset

The Centre for The Arts (kulturhuset) opened in 1988. The centre houses concerts, plays, a cinema, library, art exhibitions, rehearsals, reunions, conferences, and festivals. The Kulturhuset also has a café.

Tynsethallene

Tynset's first sports hall (Tynsethallen) was built in 1986. A second sports hall (Holmenhallen) was opened ten years later. A swimming pool and smaller gymnastics gall in the building connects them to form a complete set of sports facilities.

Savalen

Savalen is known internationally for its speed skating ice rink, where many national and international records have been achieved. Savalen has also developed a football pitch, an arena for Nordic skiing and biathlon, a roller skiing track, an alpine area, and 90 kilometres (55.9 mi) of cross-country skiing tracks. The Savalen area has become a place that is specially designed for the handicapped, which includes wheelchair paths and a specially equipped fishing pier. Savalen has become a well-known holiday and vacation area.

Early Skateboard in Norway

Tynset had one of Norway's very first pro skateboard vert ramp, it was constructed 1981-82 by Erik Snedsbøl and located in the forest near Tela Sag & Høvleri on Telneset. It was one of the first pro vert-ramp's during the prohibition period (1978–89) in Norway. From 7 September 1978 to 9 May 1989, skateboarding was completely banned in Norway. At that time, Norway was the only country in the world where it was forbidden to sell, buy or stand on a skateboard. The ban was introduced by the Nordli government and lifted by the Brundtland government, both emanating from Arbeiderpartiet (Norwegian Labour Party). Snedsbøl's skateboard ramp was the first to get permission for use in Norway during the prohibition period, and contributed to the softening of the Law of Norway. The newspaper Arbeidets Rett by Jan E. Øvergård published an article on 12 October 1983. The ramp was later published in the Swedish skateboard magazine Uppåt Väggarna (no. 5/6, 1983).

Notable peopleEdit

 
Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, 1909

SportEdit

AttractionsEdit

The following are some of the attractions in the area. The distance from the municipal center of Tynset is shown.

  • Kvikne Mines in Odden. The remains of mining operations begun in 1632. (60 min.)
  • Kvikne Church. A cruciform timber church built in 1652, with a richly decorated interior. The altar is an example of one of Norway's finest Renaissance altarpieces and the church is adorned with staves (planks) on which one can see Viking graffiti, an 11th-century crucifix and other artifacts from the Viking period. (45 min.)
  • Vollan Farm and Chapel. The farm was originally built in the mining period, the earliest part of which dates from the 17th century. This is one of the few farms in the country with its own private chapel. (45 min.)
  • Vollandagan: An annual festival connected with the traditional life of Vollan.
  • Bjørgan parsonage, Kvikne. The birthplace of the author Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson. (50 min.)
  • Soapstone quarry, Kvikneskogen, dates from 400 to 600 BC. (30 min. + 45 min. on foot).
  • Røstvangen Mines. The remains of a mining community from the beginning of the 20th century. It survived for only 17 years and was ruined by the greatest bankruptcy of the period. (25 min. + 15 min. on foot).
  • Eidsfossen Power Station, a decommissioned hydroelectric plant 5 km south of Yset that formerly powered the Røstvangen Mines.
  • Tynset Bygdemuseum. Tynset's village museum is 1 kilometer from the town centre and contains exemplar housing from early times to the present.
  • Tynset Church. An octagonal church that was built in 1795 by the architect of a larger example in Røros. The church displays a fine, gilded pulpit over the altar, which is peculiar to this area of Norway. A smaller copy of this church was built in 1825 at Bardu in the northern county of Troms by the contractor (and native of Tynset) Ola Olsen Lundberg and is accurate many details.
  • Ramsmoen museumssenter: Exhibitions throughout the year, located in the centre of Tynset.
  • Garborgdagan. An annual festival built around the work of the authors Hulda Garborg and Arne Garborg. Held in Tynset kulturhus and at Kolbotn, Garborg's home for many years.
  • Tynsetutstillinga. An annual exhibition held in Galleri Elgen in Tynset kulturhus, featuring well-known Norwegian artists.
  • Tylldalen Church. Built in 1736, the rich wall painting survived the puritan period by being painted over, thus preserving its original colours. A fine altar dominates the sanctuary and fine ceiling paintings, displaying the Swedish royal arms, make this a fine example of Norwegian late-baroque architecture.
  • Tylldalen bygdetun. Tylldalen's village museum (20 min.) A biennial play for St. Olav's Day is Norway's second oldest historical outdoor play.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  6. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Hedmarkens amt (in Norwegian) (3 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 397.
  7. ^ "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 11 February 2022.
  8. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (12 May 2016). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  9. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 11 February 2022.
  10. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2015 - Hedmark". Valg Direktoratet.
  11. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  12. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Hedmark". Valg Direktoratet.
  13. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996.
  14. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993.
  15. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988.
  16. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984.
  17. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979.
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