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Toho Co., Ltd. (東宝株式会社, Tōhō Kabushiki-gaisha) is a Japanese film, theater production, and distribution company. It has its headquarters in Yūrakuchō, Chiyoda, Tokyo, and is one of the core companies of the Hankyu Hanshin Toho Group. Outside Japan, it is best known as the producer and distributor of many kaiju and tokusatsu films, the Chouseishin tokusatsu superhero television franchise, the films of Akira Kurosawa, and the anime films of Studio Ghibli. Other famous directors, including Yasujirō Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi, Masaki Kobayashi, and Mikio Naruse, also directed films for Toho.

Toho Co., Ltd.
Native name
東宝株式会社
Public
Traded as TYO: 9602
Industry Motion picture, theater, television
Founded August 12, 1932; 85 years ago (1932-08-12) (as Tokyo-Takarazuka Theater Company)
Tokyo, Japan
Founder Ichizō Kobayashi
Headquarters Yūrakuchō, Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan
Key people
Yoshishige Shimatani
(President)
Number of employees
360+
Subsidiaries
  • Toho-Towa Distribution
  • Toho Pictures
  • Toho International Company Limited
  • Toho E. B. Company Limited
  • Toho Music Corporation
  • Toho Costume Company Limited
Website toho.co.jp/en

Toho's most famous creation is Godzilla, who features in 29 of the company's films. Godzilla, Rodan, Mothra, King Ghidorah and Mechagodzilla are described as Toho's Big Five because of the monsters' numerous appearances in all three eras of the franchise, as well as spin-offs. Toho has also been involved in the production of numerous anime titles. Its subdivisions are Toho-Towa Distribution, Toho Pictures Incorporated, Toho International Company Limited, Toho E. B. Company Limited, and Toho Music Corporation & Toho Costume Company Limited. The company is the largest shareholder (7.96%) of Fuji Media Holdings Inc.

Toho is a member of the Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan (MPPAJ), and is one of Japan's Big Four film studios.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Toho was created by the founder of Hankyu Railway, Ichizo Kobayashi, in 1932 as the Tokyo-Takarazuka Theater Company (東京宝塚劇場株式会社, Tōkyō Takarazuka Gekijō Kabushiki-gaisha). It managed much of the kabuki in Tokyo and, among other properties, the Tokyo Takarazuka Theater and the Imperial Garden Theater in Tokyo; Toho and Shochiku enjoyed a duopoly over theaters in Tokyo for many years.

After several successful film exports to the United States during the 1950s through Henry G. Saperstein, Toho took over the La Brea Theatre in Los Angeles to show its own films without the need to sell them to a distributor. It was known as the Toho Theatre from the late 1960s until the 1970s.[1] Toho also had a theater in San Francisco and opened a theater in New York City in 1963.[2]

The Shintoho Company, which existed until 1964, was named New Toho because it broke off from the original company.

The company has contributed to the production of some American films, including Sam Raimi's 1998 film, A Simple Plan.

Major productions and distributionsEdit

FilmEdit

 
Toho Educational Film Companies Logo from 1932–51, presented in a windowboxed 1.33:1 frame

1930sEdit

Film Release Date Notes
Three Sisters with Maiden Hearts 1935 The first movie made by Toho.
Enoken's Ten Millions 1936 The second movie made by Toho. The film would also later have a sequel.
Enoken's Ten Millions sequel 1936 The sequel to the previous film Enoken's Ten Millions.
Tokyo Rhapsody 1936
Humanity and Paper Balloons 1937 The first known Toho film.
Avalanche 1937
A Husband Chastity 1937
Tojuro's Love 1938
Enoken's Shrewd Period 1939
Chushingura I 1939 The second Toho film to later have a sequel.
Chushingura II 1939 The sequel to Chushingura I.

1940sEdit

Film Release Date Notes
Song of Kunya 1940 The first movie made by Toho in the 1940s.
Enoken Has His Hair Cropped 1940
Songoku: Monkey Sun 1940
Hideko the Bus-Conductor 1941
Uma 1941
The War at Sea from Hawaii to Malay 1942 The film is actually inspired by World War II, since the film was made around the time when World War II was still being fought.
Sanshiro Sugata 1943 The 3rd film to later have a sequel.
The Most Beautiful 1944
Sanshiro Sugata Part II 1945 The sequel to Sanshiro Sugata.
The Men Who Tread on the Tiger's Tail 1945
No Regrets for Our Youth 1946
Those Who Make Tomorrow 1946
One Wonderful Sunday 1947
Snow Trail 1947 The first film that was composed by Akira Ifukube. He would later compose many of the Godzilla films and many other non-Godzilla Toho kaiju films later on.
Drunken Angel 1948
Stray Dog 1949

1950sEdit

Film Release Date Notes
The Lady of Musashino 1951 The first movie made by Toho in the 1950s.
Repast 1951
Ikiru 1952
Seven Samurai 1954 This film was one of the 2 films that almost caused Toho to go into bankruptcy, however both of these 2 films were massive hits and box office successes, with the other one being Godzilla.
Godzilla 1954 The first Godzilla film made by Toho, which is also the biggest film series Toho has ever done-and still does-to this day. There would be many sequels to this film. The film was inspired by the 1952 re-release of King Kong and The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms. This film also inspired Toho to make more monster films and other companies to do the same thing as well. This is also one of the 2 films that almost caused Toho to go into bankruptcy, however both of these 2 films were massive hits and box office successes, with the other one being Seven Samurai. This would also be released in the US in the year 1956, dubbed in English and heavily re-edited into the film known as Godzilla: King of the Monsters!. This would be done again to the American versions of Godzilla Raids Again, Half Human, Varan the Unbelievable, King Kong vs. Godzilla and the Daiei film Gamera: The Giant Monster.
The Invisible Avenger 1954
Sound of the Mountain 1954
Late Chrysanthemums 1954
Floating Clouds 1955
Godzilla Raids Again 1955 The second Godzilla film to be made. This film was a rushed sequel to the previous film in the Godzilla series, Godzilla; due to it being rushed, the series was put on hiatus for 7 years until 1962's King Kong vs. Godzilla. The first Godzilla film where Godzilla fights another monster. The last Godzilla film to be made in black and white.
Half Human 1955 The first non-Godzilla monster film made by Toho. The original Japanese version was banned due to it having a negative depiction of the Ainu. The film was re-edited similar to the American version of Godzilla, Godzilla: King of the Monsters!, also due to the original Japanese version getting banned due to its negative depiction of the Ainu; the re-edited American version is the only one to be released on home video worldwide.
I Live in Fear 1955
Sudden Rain 1956
A Wife's Heart 1956
Vampire Moth 1956
Sazae-san 1956
Madame White Snake 1956 aka Byaku fugin no yoren, The Bewitched Love of Madame Pai[3]
Flowing 1956 This would be the last Toho film to be in black and white, until their 1958 film Varan the Unbelievable
Rodan 1956 The first Toho film to be made in color. The first appearance of another famous monster made by Toho known as Rodan. This is also the first appearance of another group of monsters known as the Meganulon, which would reappear in a later Godzilla film, Godzilla vs. Megaguirus.
Untamed 1957
The Mysterians 1957 The first Toho space invasion film. The first appearance of the robot monster Moguera, which would reappear in a later Godzilla film, Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla.
The Secret Scrolls Part One 1957 aka Yagyu Bugeicho; released in US in 1967, subtitled [4]
Throne of Blood 1957
Ikiteiru koheiji 1957
The Lower Depths 1957
The Secret Scrolls Part Two 1958 aka Ninjutsu; released in US in 1968, subtitled [5]
The H-Man 1958
The Hidden Fortress 1958
Shirasagi 1958
Varan the Unbelievable 1958 The first appearance of the monster Varan. This film was heavily re-edited in America, similar to Godzilla: King of the Monsters! (the American version of Godzilla), Godzilla Raids Again, Half Human and King Kong vs. Godzilla, the last movie that this has happened to is Gamera: The Giant Monster; however, that movie was originally made by Daiei rather than Toho. The last Toho film to be made in black and white. The rest would be made in color.
Battle in Outer Space 1959 The 2nd Toho space invasion film.
Ishimatsu Travels with Ghosts 1959 aka Moro no Ichimatsu yurei dochu[6]
The Birth of Japan (Nippon Tanjo) 1959 aka The Three Treasures[7]

1960sEdit

Film Release Date Notes
The Secret of the Telegian 1960 The first movie made by Toho in the 1960s.
The Human Vapor 1960 The Human Vapor was a huge success at the time. There was going to be a planned sequel, to be known as Frankenstein vs. the Human Vapor, however the film was scrapped.
The Bad Sleep Well 1960
When a Woman Ascends the Stairs 1960
Hawai Middouei daikaikusen: Taiheiyo no arashi 1960 This film is also known as Hawaii-Midway Battle of the Sea and Sky: Storm in the Pacific Ocean and Storm Over the Pacific.
Autumn Has Already Started 1960
I Bombed Pearl Harbor 1961 Another film made by Toho that was inspired by World War II.
Mothra 1961 The first appearance of another famous monster made by Toho known as Mothra. Mothra would later reappear in many later Godzilla films and a trilogy of films known as Rebirth of Mothra, Rebirth of Mothra II, and Rebirth of Mothra III.
Yojimbo 1961
The Last War 1961 aka Sekai daisenso (The Great World War)[8]
The End of Summer 1961
My Friend Death 1961 aka Yurei Hanjo-ki; B&W/Scope ref>Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 365.</ref>
Sanjuro 1962
The Youth and his Amulet 1962 aka Gen and Fudo-Myoh[9]
Gorath 1962 The monster in the film Gorath, known as Maguma, was completely removed in the American version of the film, due to the people that released it in America thinking that Maguma looked too funny-looking, even mocking him by referring to him as Wally the Walrus, based on Woody Woodpecker's arch-rival.
King Kong vs. Godzilla 1962 The highest grossing Godzilla film ever, beating even Godzilla. The 3rd Godzilla film made by Toho, and the first Godzilla film made since Godzilla Raids Again in 1955. The first appearance and first film of King Kong since King Kong and partially The Son of Kong, both made in 1933, but the first appearance of King Kong in a Toho film. The first appearance of Godzilla and King Kong in color, since their previous appearances were in black and white. This is also the first appearance of the giant octopus known as the Oodako.
Rorentsu o· Ruisu no shōgai 1962
A Wanderer's Notebook 1962
High and Low 1963
The Lost World of Sinbad 1963 aka Dai tozoku (The Great Thief); aka Samurai Pirate[10]
Matango 1963
Atragon 1963 The film Atragon was a huge success. The film also marks the first appearance of the monster Manda, who would later reappear in Destroy All Monsters, stock footage in All Monsters Attack and Terror of Mechagodzilla, and finally in Godzilla: Final Wars.
Yearning 1964
Whirlwind 1964 aka Dai tatsumaki[11]
Woman in the Dunes 1964
Onibaba 1964 aka The Witch, The Hole; B&W/TohoScope[12]
Mothra vs. Godzilla 1964 The first time Godzilla fights Mothra; Godzilla would fight against Mothra again in later Godzilla films. The last Showa Godzilla film where Godzilla is the main antagonist; after this film, Godzilla would become an anti-hero, and even later, a true hero. Godzilla would not be an antagonist again until 1984's The Return of Godzilla.
Dogora 1964
Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster 1964 The first Godzilla film in which Godzilla's name is not included in the title. The first time Godzilla is an anti-hero. The first appearance of Godzilla's main rival, King Ghidorah. The second appearance of Rodan who first appeared in the film Rodan.
Kwaidan (Ghost Story) 1964 aka Kaidan; anthology comprising four short stories[13]
Shirasagi 1964 aka The Snowy Heron
Kokusai himitsu keisatsu: Kayaku no taru 1964
Kokusai himitsu keisatsu: Kagi no kagi 1965 This and the above film were spliced together to form the film What's Up, Tiger Lily?
Tokyo Olympiad 1965
Illusion of Blood 1965 aka Yotsuya Ghost Story (Yotsuya Kaidan)[14]
Red Beard 1965
Frankenstein Conquers the World 1965 The film marks Frankenstein's first appearance in a Toho film, in which he is Godzilla-sized. This also marks the first appearance of the monster Baragon, who would later reappear in Destroy All Monsters and Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack. The film would also make a sequel known as War of the Gargantuas. There was an alternate ending which featured the Oodako, however the studio did not like the ending, so it was changed.
Invasion of Astro-Monster 1965 The 5th Godzilla film. This film marks the first appearance of the Xillians. The is the first space invasion Godzilla film. The Xillians would later reappear in Godzilla: Final Wars.
We Will Remember 1965/66
The Face of Another 1966
War of the Gargantuas 1966 The sequel to Frankenstein Conquers The World. The final appearance of the Oodako. This film was actually a huge success. The Gargantuas, named Sanda and Gaira in the Japanese version, are born from pieces of Frankenstein after Frankenstein was killed at the end of the previous film.
Ebirah, Horror of the Deep 1966 The first Godzilla film in which the main setting is not a city but rather a South Pacific island. Godzilla also fights a giant lobster named Ebirah. The same kind of main setting would be used in the next film, Son of Godzilla. The film was originally meant to be a King Kong film, made in collaboration with Rankin/Bass Productions, but Rankin/Bass rejected it; however, Toho liked the plot so they made it into a Godzilla film instead. Ebirah would later reappear in Godzilla: Final Wars.
Adventure in Takla Makan (Kiganjo no boken) 1966 aka Adventure of Kigan Castle[15]
The Killing Bottle (Zettai zetsumei) 1967 spy film starring Nick Adams[16]
Samurai Rebellion 1967
Son of Godzilla 1967 The first appearance of Godzilla's first son, Minilla a.k.a. Minya. The main setting is a South Pacific island, just like in Ebirah, Horror of the Deep. Godzilla would also fight three giant praying mantises named Kamacuras, one of which would later reappear in Godzilla: Final Wars, and a giant spider named Kumonga, which would later reappear in Destroy All Monsters and Godzilla: Final Wars.
King Kong Escapes 1967 The 2nd and final King Kong film made by Toho. King Kong Escapes is not a sequel to King Kong vs. Godzilla, but rather a film based on an animated TV show made by Rankin/Bass known as The King Kong Show (Rankin/Bass also made several classic Christmas TV specials and The Last Dinosaur). King Kong also fights a dinosaur named Gorosaurus, who would later reappear in Destroy All Monsters and a robot version of himself, known as Mechani-Kong, which may have been the inspiration for Godzilla's second biggest rival Mechagodzilla.
Destroy All Monsters 1968 The film features monsters from previous films which are Godzilla, Minilla, Mothra, Rodan, Anguirus, King Ghidorah, Varan, Baragon, Kumonga, Gorosaurus, and Manda. However most of the monsters only made a few minutes of screentime, especially Varan and Baragon. Destroy All Monsters was meant to be the last Godzilla film, but due to its success, Toho decided to make more Godzilla films.
Kuroneko (aka The Black Cat) 1968 B&W/ TohoScope[17]
Latitude Zero 1969 aka Ido zero dai sakusen (Latitude Zero: Big Military Operation)[18]
Jigoku: Portrait of Hell 1969 aka A Story of Hell, Jigokuhen[19]
All Monsters Attack 1969 The tenth Godzilla film. The first Godzilla film to be geared towards little children. The first Godzilla to heavily use a lot of stock footage from previous films. Many fans considered this film to be the worst Godzilla film along with Godzilla vs. Megalon and Godzilla (1998).

1970sEdit

Film Release date Notes
Space Amoeba (aka Yog, Monster from Space) 1970 last of the classic non-Godzilla films made by Toho[20];
Dodes'ka-den 1970
The Vampire Doll 1970 aka Chi o suu ningyo (Bloodthirsty Doll); aka Night of the Vampire[21]
Inn of Evil 1971 aka Inochi bonifuro[22]
To Love Again 1971
Godzilla vs. Hedorah 1971 The first Godzilla film where Godzilla is officially the hero. The last Godzilla film which Godzilla fights a monster that acts independently or like a wild animal in the Showa series, as the later monsters in the Showa series were controlled by others. Yoshimitsu Banno, the director of the film, was going to make a sequel to this film, but it was scrapped due to the fact that Tomoyuki Tanaka reportedly hated Godzilla vs. Hedorah, so he fired Yoshimitsu Banno. The next film was going to be called Godzilla vs. Redmoon, but this was scrapped and became Daigoro vs. Goliath, so then they planned a new film called Godzilla vs. The Space Monsters: Earth Defensive Directive, then this was scrapped and became The Return of King Ghidorah, then this was scrapped too, after which the film that was ultimately made was Godzilla vs. Gigan.
The Battle of Okinawa 1971
Daigoro vs. Goliath 1971 The film was a co-production with Toho and Tsuburaya Productions. The film was originally planned to be Godzilla vs. Redmoon but it was scrapped and finally became this film; made for Japanese TV[23]
Lake of Dracula 1971 aka Chi o suu me (Bloodthirsty Eyes)[24]
Young Guy vs. Blue Guy 1971
Godzilla vs. Gigan 1972 The last film which Haruo Nakajima played Godzilla; this is also the last Showa Godzilla film in which Godzilla fights King Ghidorah. This film also features stock music and stock footage from previous films.
Godzilla vs. Megalon 1973 Godzilla vs. Megalon is the first Godzilla film which Godzilla is not played by Haruo Nakajima; this also marks the return of Gigan and the first appearances of Megalon and Jet Jaguar. The film was originally going to be a Jet Jaguar-only movie in which he fights only Megalon, but this was scrapped.
Kure Kure Takora 1973
Submersion of Japan 1973 aka Tidal Wave; aka Nippon chiubotsu[25]
Lady Snowblood 1973
The Human Revolution (Ningen Kakumei)[26] 1973
Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla 1974 The first appearance of Godzilla's second-greatest rival; his mechanical duplicate, known as Mechagodzilla. The film is considered one of the best Godzilla films in the original series.
ESPY[27] 1974
Prophecies of Nostradamus 1974 aka The Last Days of Planet Earth, Catastrophe 1999[28]
Evil of Dracula 1974 aka The Bloodthirsty Rose /Chio o suu bara/ The Vampire Rose[29]
Lupin III 1974
Terror of Mechagodzilla 1975 The direct sequel to Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla. This is the least successful film from the box office, and was considered a bomb, however many fans consider this to be one of the best Godzilla films in the original series. This would be the last Godzilla film for 9 years until 1984's The Return of Godzilla.
The Human Revolution II (Zoku Ningen Kakumei)[30] 1975 The sequel to The Human Revolution.
Demon Spies 1975
Zero Fighter 1976
The Inugamis 1976
House 1977
The War in Space 1977 aka Wakusei Daisenso (The Great Planet War)[31]
The Last Dinosaur 1977 Co-production between Toho and Rankin/Bass.
The Mystery of Mamo 1978
The Phoenix 1978 aka Hinotori[32]

1980sEdit

Film Release Date Notes
Doraemon: The Motion Picture 1980 The first of the Doraemon Series. There would be multiple sequels of this film during the 2000s and 2010s.
Phoenix 2772 1980 Sequel to The Phoenix (1978)
Kagemusha 1980
Eki Station 1981
The Wizard of Oz 1982 Based off the 1900s kids book, The Wizard of Oz.
Techno Police 21C 1982
The Highest Honor 1982
Deathquake (Jishin retto) 1983 aka Earthquake 7.9; released directly to TV in USA[33]
Golgo 13 1983
The Makioka Sisters 1983
Sayonara Jupiter 1983[34] There is a scene which shows someone watching Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster. The last film Akihiko Hirata acted in, he was planned to be in The Return of Godzilla, but unfortunately died due to throat cancer.
Macross: Do You Remember Love? 1984
Urusei Yatsura: Beautiful Dreamer 1984
Godzilla 1985 (aka The Return of Godzilla)[35] 1984 The first Heisei Godzilla film, despite this film being made during the Showa period, since the Heisei period did not start until 1989. The first Godzilla film since Terror of Mechagodzilla, made back in 1975. The first time Godzilla is the main antagonist, since Mothra vs. Godzilla, made back in 1964. This is also which Godzilla grew to 80 meters rather than 50 meters.
Ran 1985
Vampire Hunter D 1985
Prussian Blue Portrait 1986
A Taxing Woman 1987
Neo Tokyo 1987
Tokyo: The Last Megalopolis 1988
Grave of the Fireflies 1988 Co-production with Studio Ghibli.
Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day 1988
Akira 1988
My Neighbor Totoro 1988 Co-production with Studio Ghibli.
Godzilla vs. Biollante 1989 The second Godzilla film in the Heisei series. The first official Godzilla film made during the Heisei era. The first Heisei Godzilla film in which Godzilla fights an enemy.
Gunhed 1989 aka Ganhedo[36]
Sweet Home 1989
Tokyo: The Last War 1989

1990sEdit

Film Release Date Notes
Devil Hunter Yohko 1990
Only Yesterday 1991
Zeiram 1991 aka Zeiramu[37]
Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah 1991 The first appearance of King Ghidorah in a movie since Godzilla vs. Gigan, made in 1972. This was considered one of the best Godzilla films of all time. This film is also controversial, because it shows Godzilla in his original form, a Godzillasaurus, attacking American soldiers during World War II. This also marks the first appearance of King Ghidorah's mechanical form, Mecha-King Ghidorah. Also Godzilla went up to 100 meters this time, instead of 80 meters as in the previous 2 Godzilla films.
Godzilla vs. Mothra 1992 The first appearance of Mothra since Destroy All Monsters, made in 1968. The second time Godzilla fights Mothra; this would be used for later Godzilla films.
Porco Rosso 1992
Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II 1993 The first appearance of Mechagodzilla since Terror of Mechagodzilla, made in 1975. Like the previous 2 appearances of Mechagodzilla, Mechagodzilla was the main antagonist. However, in this movie and Mechagodzilla's later appearances, Mechagodzilla is the hero and Godzilla is the villain. The first appearance of Godzilla's second son, here known as Baby Godzilla.
Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla 1994 The first new monster Godzilla fights since the previous new monster Godzilla fought was Biollante, in the movie Godzilla vs. Biollante, made back in 1989. The 2nd appearance of Godzilla's second son, now known as Little Godzilla.
Gamera: Guardian of the Universe 1995 The first Toho Gamera film. The first Heisei Gamera film. The first Gamera film since Gamera: Super Monster made by Daiei back in 1980.
Godzilla vs. Destoroyah 1995 The last Heisei Godzilla film. The last Godzilla film until Godzilla (1998), and the last Toho Godzilla film until Godzilla 2000: Millennium. The 3rd and final appearance of Godzilla's second son, now known as Godzilla Junior.
Gakkō no Kaidan 1995 The first film of the Gakkō no Kaidan Series.
Gakkō no Kaidan 2 1996 The sequel to Gakkō no Kaidan
Gamera 2: Attack of Legion 1996 The 2nd Gamera film in the Heisei Gamera trilogy.
New Kimagure Orange Road: And Then, The Beginning of That Summer 1996
Rebirth of Mothra 1996 The first film of the Rebirth of Mothra trilogy. The first Mothra film without Godzilla since the 1961 film Mothra.
Gakkō no Kaidan 3 1997 The 3rd film of the Gakkō no Kaidan series.
Detective Conan: The Time Bombed Skyscraper 1997 The first film of the Detective Conan series.
Princess Mononoke 1997
Rebirth of Mothra II 1997 The 2nd film of the Rebirth of Mothra trilogy.
Rebirth of Mothra III 1998 The 3rd and final film of the Rebirth of Mothra trilogy.
Detective Conan: The Fourteenth Target 1998 The second film of the Detective Conan series.
Godzilla 1998 Originally made and released by Tristar. Many fans considered this film to be the worst Godzilla film, along with All Monsters Attack and Godzilla vs. Megalon.
Ring 1998
Pocket Monsters: Mewtwo's Counterattack 1998 The first Pokémon movie made. There would be later Pokémon movies made in the future. The film was originally made by the gaming company known as Nintendo.
Detective Conan: The Last Wizard of the Century 1999 The third film of the Detective Conan series.
Gakkō no Kaidan 4 1999 The last film of the Gakkō no Kaidan series.
Gamera 3: The Revenge of Iris 1999 The 3rd and last film of the Heisei Gamera trilogy.
Godzilla 2000: Millennium 1999 The first Toho Godzilla film since Godzilla vs. Destoroyah, made in 1995. The first Millennium Godzilla film. This is also the only Millennium Godzilla film made in the 90s.
Pocket Monsters the Movie: Phantom Pokémon, Explosive Birth of Lugia 1999 The 2nd Pokémon movie made. The last Pokémon movie made in the 90s. The sequel to the first Pokémon film known as Pocket Monsters: Mewtwo's Counterattack.

2000sEdit

Film Release Date Notes
Detective Conan: Captured in Her Eyes 2000 The 4th film of the Detective Conan series.
Pocket Monsters: Lord of the Unknown Tower – Entei 2000 The 3rd film of the Pokémon animated series.
Godzilla vs. Megaguirus 2000 The 2nd film of the Millennium Godzilla series. The first Godzilla film to be released in the 2000s. Unlike the previous two series, this one has nothing to do with the previous film Godzilla 2000: Millennium.
Detective Conan: Countdown to Heaven 2001 The 5th film of the Detective Conan Series.
Metropolis 2001
Merdeka 17805 2001 Co-production with Rapi Films from Indonesia.
Kairo 2001
Spirited Away 2001 Co-production with Studio Ghibli.
Inuyasha 2001-2004 Co-productions with Sunrise.
Pocket Monsters Celebi, the Meeting that Transversed Time 2001 The 4th film of the Pokémon animated series. Originally it was going to be more on the G.S. Ball, but this was scrapped completely.
Beyblade 2001 Also known as Bakuten Shoot Beyblade The Movie: Gekitou!! Takao vs. Daichi.
Tottoko Hamtaro The Movie: Adventures in Ham-Ham Land 2001 The first film of the Hamtaro series.
Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack 2001 The 3rd entry of the Millennium Godzilla series; just like Godzilla vs. Megaguirus, it has nothing to do with the previous 2 Godzilla films and all the others, except for the first film.
Detective Conan: The Phantom of Baker Street 2002 The 6th film of the Detective Conan series.
Pocket Monsters The Guardian of the Water Capital Latias and Latios 2002 The 5th film of the Pokémon animated series. This also features Generation 3 Pokémon that appeared during Generation 2.
Trotting Hamtaro The Movie: Ham Ham Hamuja! The Captive Princess 2002 The 2nd film of the Hamtaro series.
Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla 2002 The 4th film of the Millennium series. Like the rest of the Millennium Godzilla series, none of the previous films have nothing to do with this film, except for the first film. However this is the only one to have a sequel, known as Godzilla, Mothra, Mechagodzilla: Tokyo S.O.S
Detective Conan: Crossroad in the Ancient Capital 2003 The 7th film of the Detective Conan series.
One Missed Call 2003
Tottoko Hamtaro The Movie: Ham-Ham Grand Prix - Miracle in Aurora Valley - Ribbon-chan's Close Call! 2003 The 3rd film of the Hamtaro series.
Godzilla, Mothra, Mechagodzilla: Tokyo S.O.S 2003 The 5th film of the Millennium Godzilla series. The only Millennium Godzilla film to be a sequel to a previous Millennium Godzilla film, Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla. This film is also connected with Mothra.
Pocket Monsters Advanced Generation The Wishing Star of the Seven Nights Jirachi 2003 The 6th film of the Pokémon animated series.
Howl's Moving Castle 2004 Co-production with Studio Ghibli.
Naruto the Movie 2004
Godzilla: Final Wars 2004 The final Godzilla film of the Millennium series. The first and only Godzilla film to have nothing to do with any Godzilla film before it, even the first film. The last Godzilla film until Godzilla in 2014. The last Toho Godzilla film until Shin Godzilla in 2016.
Steamboy 2004
Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence 2004
Tottoko Hamtaro Ham Ham Paradise! The Movie: Hamtaro and the Demon of the Mysterious Picture Book Tower 2004 The 4th film of the Hamtaro series.
Pocket Monsters Advanced Generation The Visitor from a Fissure in the Sky Deoxys 2004 The 7th film of the Pokémon animated series.
Lolerei 2005
Detective Conan: Strategy Above the Depths 2005 The 8th film of the Detective Conan series.
Always Sanchōme no Yūhi 2005
Naruto the Movie 2 2005 The sequel to Naruto the Movie.
Densha Otoko 2005
NANA 2005
Arashi no Yoru ni 2005
Pocket Monsters Advanced Generation Mew and the Wave-Guiding Hero Lucario 2005 The 8th film of the Pokémon animated series. This features Lucario, a Pokémon of the next Generation after Generation 3.
Bleach: Memories of Nobody 2006
Dōbutsu no Mori 2006 Co-production with O.L.M., Nintendo, and Shogakukan.
Detective Conan: The Private Eyes' Requiem 2006 The 9th film of the Detective Conan series.
Nada Sousou 2006
NANA2 2006 The sequel to NANA.
Nihon Chinbotsu (Japan Sinks) 2006
Pocket Monsters Advanced Generation Pokémon Ranger and the Prince of the Sea Manaphy 2006 The 9th film of the Pokémon animated series.
Rough 2006
Touch 2006
Always Zoku Sanchome no Yuhi 2007 Godzilla makes a special cameo appearance is this film. The first Toho film to feature Godzilla since Godzilla: Final Wars
Eiga De Tojo-Tamagotchi: Dokidoki! Uchuu no Maigotchi!? 2007
Hero 2007
Crows Zero 2007
Detective Conan: Jolly Roger in the Deep Azure 2007 The tenth film of the Detective Conan Series.
Pocket Monsters Diamond & Pearl Dialga VS Palkia VS Darkrai 2007 The tenth film of the Pokemon animated series.
Pocket Monsters Diamond and Pearl Giratina and the Bouquet of the Sky: Shaymin 2008 The 11th film of the Pokemon animated series.
Hana Yori Dango Final 2008
Ponyo on the Cliff 2008
20th Century Boys: Beginning of the End 2008 The first film of the 20th Century Boy series.
I Survived a Japanese Game Show 2008
Mystery of the Third Planet 2008
Detective Conan: Full Score of Fear 2008 The 11th film of the Detective Conan series.
20th Century Boys 2: The Last Hope and 20th Century Boys 3: Redemption 2009 The sequels to 20th Century Boys: Beginning of the End.
Doraemon the Movie: Nobita's Spaceblazer 2009 A sequel to the 1980 film.
Crows Zero 2 2009 The sequel to Crows Zero.
Detective Conan: The Raven Chaser 2009 The 12th film of the Detective Conan series.
April Bride 2009
Rookies 2009
Gokusen: The Movie 2009
Amalfi: Rewards of the Goddess 2009
Pokémon: Arceus and the Jewel of Life 2009 The 12th film of the Pokemon animated series.
I Give My First Love to You 2009
Shizumanu Taiyō 2009
Professor Layton and the Eternal Diva 2009

2010sEdit

Film Release date Notes
Doraemon: Nobita's Great Battle of the Mermaid King 2010 Another sequel to the Doraemon series.
Liar Game: The Final Stage 2010
Detective Conan: The Lost Ship in the Sky 2010 The thirteenth film of the Detective Conan series.
Confessions 2010
Bayside Shakedown 3 2010
Pokémon: Zoroark: Master of Illusions 2010 The 12th film for the Pokemon animated series before Spirit International distributed them.
Arrietty 2010
Hanamizuki 2010
Colorful (film) 2010
Umizaru 3: The Last Message 2010 Another sequel to Umizaru.
13 Assassins 2010
Gantz 2011 Also known as Gantz: Perfect Answer
Doraemon: Nobita and the New Steel Troops—Winged Angels 2011 Another sequel to the Doraemon series.
Detective Conan: Quarter of Silence 2011 The 14th film of the Detective Conan series.
Pokémon the Movie: Black—Victini and Reshiram and Pokémon the Movie: White—Victini and Zekrom (2011) 2011 The 14th film(s) for the Pokemon animated series before Spirit International distributed them. This is also the first Pokemon film(s) to be the same story, but the other version has the legendary Pokemon Reshiram and Zekrom reversed.
From Up on Poppy Hill 2011
Unfair 2: The Answer 2011 The sequel to Unfair.
A Ghost of a Chance 2011
Genji Monogatari: Sennen no Nazo 2011
Always Sanchōme no Yūhi '64 2012
Ace Attorney 2012
Blue Exorcist: The Movie 2012 Co-production with A-1 Pictures.
Doraemon: Nobita and the Island of Miracles—Animal Adventure 2012 Another sequel to the Doraemon series.
Detective Conan: The Eleventh Striker 2012 The 15th film of the Detective Conan series.
Thermae Romae 2012 The first film of the Thermae Romae series.
Brave Hearts: Umizaru 2012
Pokémon the Movie: Kyurem vs. the Sword of Justice 2012 The 15th film for the Pokemon animated series before Spirit International distributed them.
The Wolf Children Ame and Yuki 2012
Jewelpet the Movie: Sweets Dance Princess 2012
Bayside Shakedown The Final 2012 The final Bayside Shakedown film.
Doraemon: Nobita's Secret Gadget Museum 2013 Another sequel to the Doraemon series.
Detective Conan: Private Eye in the Distant Sea 2013 The 16th film of The Detective Conan series.
Midsummer's Equation 2013
Pokémon the Movie: Genesect and the Legend Awakened 2013 The 16th film for the Pokemon animated series before Spirit International distributed them.
The Wind Rises 2013
Gatchaman 2013
The Tale of the Princess Kaguya 2013
Lupin the 3rd vs. Detective Conan: The Movie 2013 The 17th film of the Detective Conan series. The 2nd film in the Lupin the Third series. This is also a team-up between 2 different series which appeared in one film, similar to King Kong vs. Godzilla.
The Eternal Zero 2013
Detective Conan: Dimensional Sniper 2014 The 18th film of the Detective Conan series.
Thermae Romae II 2014 The 2nd film of the Thermae Romae series.
A Bolt from the Blue 2014
Pokémon the Movie: Diancie and the Cocoon of Destruction 2014 The 17th film of the Pokemon animated series. The beginning of Spirit International's distribution of the Pokémon films.
When Marnie Was There 2014
Godzilla 2014 The first Godzilla film since Godzilla: Final Wars. The first American Godzilla film since Godzilla (1998). The first Godzilla film made by Legendary Pictures and Warner Bros. The first film of the MonsterVerse series. The first Godzilla MonsterVerse film. This would be the first Godzilla film made since Godzilla: Final Wars, until Toho's Shin Godzilla.
Stand by Me Doraemon 2014 Another sequel to the Doraemon series.
Lupin III 2014 The 3rd film of the Lupin the Third Series. It is actually the 4th film if you count Lupin the 3rd vs. Detective Conan: The Movie.
A Samurai Chronicle 2014
Parasyte: Part 1 2014 The first film of the Parasyte series.
The Last: Naruto the Movie 2014 The last film of the Naruto series until Boruto: Naruto the Movie.
Blue Spring Ride 2014
The Vancouver Asahi 2014
Yo-Kai Watch the Movie: The Secret is Created, Nyan! 2014 The first Yo-Kai Watch film for the Yo-Kai Watch TV series, similar to the Pokémon animated series.
Doraemon: Nobita's Space Heroes 2015 Another sequel to the Doraemon series.
Assassination Classroom 2015
Crayon Shin-chan: My Moving Story! Cactus Large Attack! 2015
Detective Conan: Sunflowers of Inferno 2015 The last film of the Detective Conan series.
Parasyte: Part 2 2015 The 2nd film of the Parasyte series.
Flying Colors 2015
The Boy and the Beast 2015
Hero 2015
Pokémon the Movie: Hoopa and the Clash of Ages 2015 The 18th film of the Pokémon animated series. International distribution is handled by Spirit International.
Dragon Blade (film) 2015 Co-production with Studio Ghibli.
Attack on Titan 2015 It is also known as Attack on Titan: End of the World. The first official Toho monster film made in live action since Godzilla: Final Wars, which was made in 2004.
Boruto: Naruto the Movie 2015 The first Naruto film since The Last: Naruto the Movie.
Unfair: The End 2015 The last film of the Unfair series.
Shin Godzilla 2016 The first Toho Godzilla film since Godzilla: Final Wars. The first Toho Godzilla film to use two directors. The first appearance of Godzilla in an official Toho film since his cameo appearance in the 2007 film Always Zoku Sanchome no Yuhi. The first appearance of Godzilla since the 2014 film Godzilla. The first of the post-Millennium Godzilla series. The first Godzilla film in which he is the only monster in the movie since the 1954 film Godzilla and the 1984 film The Return of Godzilla.
Your name. 2016
Pokémon the Movie: Volcanion and the Mechanical Marvel 2016 The 19th film of the Pokémon animated series.
Doraemon the Movie 2017: Great Adventure in the Antarctic Kachi Kochi 2017 Another sequel to the Doraemon series.
Kong: Skull Island 2017 The second MonsterVerse film. The first King Kong film since the 2005 remake of King Kong. The first MonsterVerse film which does not have Godzilla in it, except for the post-credits scene which feature cave drawings of Godzilla, Mothra and Rodan, with the last cave drawing showing Godzilla fighting King Ghidorah, after which Godzilla's roar is heard when the screen goes black, hinting at the upcoming 2019 film Godzilla: King of the Monsters. The first King Kong reboot film since King Kong vs. Godzilla and King Kong Escapes.
Crayon Shin-chan: Invasion!! Alien Shiriri 2017
Godzilla: Planet of the Monsters 2017 The first animated Godzilla film. The second film of the post-Millennium series. It has been said that it will be the first of a trilogy, with two later animated Godzilla films coming soon after this one.
Pokemon the Movie: I Choose You! 2017 The 20th film of the Pokemon animated series. This film will be distributed by Spirit International Pictures.[clarification needed]
Doraemon: Nobita's Treasure Island 2018 Another sequel to the Doraemon series.

UpcomingEdit

Film Release Date Notes
Godzilla: King of the Monsters 2019 Under license to Toho, a Legendary Pictures production. The third MonsterVerse film. The second MonsterVerse Godzilla film.
Godzilla vs. Kong 2020 Under license to Toho, a Legendary Pictures production. The fourth MonsterVerse film. The third MonsterVerse Godzilla film and the second MonsterVerse King Kong film.
Pokémon's Detective Pikachu TBA Based on a game of the same name.

TelevisionEdit

TokusatsuEdit

AnimeEdit

In more recent years and for a period, they have produced video games. One of their first video game was the 1990 NES game titled Circus Caper. Later, they followed with a series of games based on Godzilla and a 1992 game called Serizawa Nobuo no Birdy Try. It also published games such as Super Aleste. They even worked with Bandai on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, released in Japan in 1988 and in the United States in 1989.

HeadquartersEdit

Toho's headquarters, the Toho Hibiya Building (東宝日比谷ビル, Tōhō Hibiya Biru), are in Yūrakuchō, Chiyoda, Tokyo. The company moved into its current headquarters in April 2005.[38]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Fox La Brea Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. Cinema Treasures. Retrieved on 2014-05-12.
  2. ^ "Toho" Far East Film News December 25, 1963.
  3. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 364.
  4. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 368.
  5. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 369.
  6. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 365.
  7. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 373.
  8. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 362.
  9. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 376.
  10. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 363.
  11. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 375.
  12. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 366.
  13. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 360.
  14. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 357.
  15. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 337.
  16. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 359.
  17. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 359.
  18. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 362.
  19. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 367.
  20. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 376.
  21. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 373.
  22. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 357.
  23. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 357.
  24. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 361.
  25. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 371.
  26. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0123193/
  27. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 343.
  28. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 361.
  29. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 343.
  30. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0164237/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1
  31. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 375.
  32. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 355.
  33. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 340.
  34. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 367.
  35. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 347.
  36. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 344.
  37. ^ Galbraith, Stuart (1994). Japanese Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. McFarland. p. 376.
  38. ^ "会社の沿革". Toho. Retrieved on February 26, 2010. "2005年4月 東宝本社を東宝日比谷ビル(東京都千代田区有楽町一丁目2-2)に移転。"

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit