North Carolina's 13th congressional district

The thirteenth congressional district of North Carolina was re-established in 2002 after the state gained population in the 2000 United States Census. Previously, the state had 13 districts from the first election following the 1810 United States Census until the reapportionment following the 1840 United States Census.

North Carolina's 13th congressional district
North Carolina's 13th congressional district (since 2021).png
North Carolina's 13th congressional district since January 3, 2021
Representative
  Ted Budd
RAdvance
Distribution
  • 73.33% urban[1]
  • 26.67% rural
Population (2019)780,466[2]
Median household
income
$56,718[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+20[3]
Created1813 (original), 2003

From 2003 to 2013 the district included most of northern Wake County, all of Person and Caswell counties as well as parts of Rockingham, Granville, Guilford, and Alamance counties.

However, reapportionment after the 2010 census shifted the district more to the south and east. As a result, it lost its share of Alamance, Caswell, Guilford, Person, and Rockingham counties. In place of those five counties, portions of Durham, Edgecombe, Franklin, Nash, Vance, Wayne, and Wilson counties were added. More of Wake County and less of Granville County were also included. While Barack Obama carried the old 13th with 59 percent of the vote in 2008, John McCain would have won it with 54 percent of the vote had it existed under the new lines.

As a result, Congressman Brad Miller (Democrat), who represented the district from its creation in 2003, announced he would not seek re-election to office in 2012.[4][5] From 2013 to 2017, the district was represented by Republican George Holding.

After a mid-decade redistricting, most of the old 13th was essentially merged with the old 2nd district. A new 13th was created, stretching from the northern suburbs of Charlotte to Greensboro. Republican Ted Budd became the first congressman from this new district.

In 2021, a new 13th district was created that included counties west of Charlotte. While North Carolina Speaker of the House Tim Moore was expected to run for the seat, he said he would not after Madison Cawthorn announced his candidacy.[6]

Counties coveredEdit

The entirety of:

Parts of:

Recent election results from presidential racesEdit

Year Office Results
2000 President Bush 50 - 49%
2004 President Kerry 52 - 47%
2008 President Obama 59 - 40%
2012 President Romney 56 - 42%
2016 President Trump 53 - 44%
2020 President Trump 57 - 31%

List of members representing the districtEdit

Member Party Term Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
District created March 4, 1813
Meshack Franklin Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
13th Redistricted from the 12th district and re-elected in 1813.
Lost re-election.
1813–1823
[data unknown/missing]
 
Lewis Williams
Democratic-Republican[a] March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1825
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
25th
26th
27th
Elected in 1815.
Re-elected in 1817.
Re-elected in 1819.
Re-elected in 1821.
Re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Re-elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
Re-elected in 1833.
Re-elected in 1835.
Re-elected in 1837.
Re-elected in 1839.
Re-elected in 1841.
Died.
1823–1833
[data unknown/missing]
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1837
1833–1843
[data unknown/missing]
Whig March 4, 1837 –
February 23, 1842
Vacant February 23, 1842 –
April 27, 1842
27th
Anderson Mitchell Whig April 27, 1842 –
March 3, 1843
Elected to finish Williams's term.
Redistricted to the 3rd district and lost re-election.
District eliminated March 4, 1843
District re-established January 3, 2003
 
Brad Miller
Democratic January 3, 2003 –
January 3, 2013
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Retired.
2003–2013
 
 
George Holding
Republican January 3, 2013 –
January 3, 2017
113th
114th
Elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
2013–2017
 
 
Ted Budd
Republican January 3, 2017 –
Present
115th
116th
117th
Elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Redistricted to the 7th district and retiring to run for U.S. senator.
2017–2021
 
2021–Present
 

Election resultsEdit

Year Democratic Republican Libertarian
2002 Brad Miller: 100,287 Carolyn W. Grant: 77,688 Alex MacDonald: 5,295  
2004 Brad Miller: 160,896 Virginia Johnson: 112,788  
2006 Brad Miller: 98,540 Vernon Robinson: 56,120  
2008 Brad Miller: 221,379 Hugh Webster: 114,383  
2010 Brad Miller: 116,103 William Randall: 93,099  
2012 Charles Malone: 160,115 George Holding: 210,495  
2014 Brenda Cleary: 114,718 George Holding: 153,991
2016 Bruce Davis: 156,049 Ted Budd: 199,443
2018 Kathy Manning: 130,402 Ted Budd: 147,570 Tom Bailey: 5,513
2020 Scott Huffman: 124,648 Ted Budd: 267,181

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Supported the Crawford faction in the 1824 United States presidential election.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/cd_state.html
  2. ^ a b Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  3. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ "Redistricting sets up Miller, Price as 4th district rivals". News & Observer. Retrieved August 13, 2012.
  5. ^ "Rep. Miller won't fight Rep. Price for 4th district seat". News & Observer. Retrieved August 13, 2012.
  6. ^ Battaglia, Danielle; Murphy, Brian; Vaughn, Dawn Baumgartner (November 12, 2021). "Cawthorn announces he'll change districts for 2022, shaking up NC elections". News & Observer. Retrieved November 13, 2021.

Coordinates: 35°47′00″N 78°12′47″W / 35.78333°N 78.21306°W / 35.78333; -78.21306