March 1945

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The following events occurred in March 1945:

March 1, 1945 (Thursday)Edit

March 2, 1945 (Friday)Edit

March 3, 1945 (Saturday)Edit

March 4, 1945 (Sunday)Edit

March 5, 1945 (Monday)Edit

March 6, 1945 (Tuesday)Edit

March 7, 1945 (Wednesday)Edit

March 8, 1945 (Thursday)Edit

March 9, 1945 (Friday)Edit

March 10, 1945 (Saturday)Edit

March 11, 1945 (Sunday)Edit

March 12, 1945 (Monday)Edit

  • The Soviet 1st Belorussian Front took Küstrin.[13]
  • Santa Fe riot: Four internees at a Japanese internment camp near Santa Fe, New Mexico were seriously wounded after a scuffle broke out between internees and Border Patrol agents guarding the facility that resulted in the use of tear gas and batons.
  • Benito Mussolini escaped injury when an Allied fighter plane strafed his convoy of cars near Lake Garda.[11]
  • German submarine U-260 struck a mine and was scuttled south of Ireland.
  • Died: Friedrich Fromm, 56, German army officer (executed by the Nazis by firing squad for failing to act against the 20 July bomb plot)

March 13, 1945 (Tuesday)Edit

March 14, 1945 (Wednesday)Edit

March 15, 1945 (Thursday)Edit

March 16, 1945 (Friday)Edit

  • Operation Spring Awakening ended in German failure.
  • German submarine U-367 struck a mine and sank northeast of Danzig.
  • President Roosevelt said at a news conference that as a matter of decency, Americans would have to tighten their belts so food could be shipped to war-ravaged countries to keep people from starving.[21]
  • Died: Börries von Münchhausen, 70, German poet and Nazi activist (suicide by overdose of sleeping pills)

March 17, 1945 (Saturday)Edit

March 18, 1945 (Sunday)Edit

  • An air battle was fought in the skies over Berlin when 1,329 Allied bombers and 700 long-range fighters were met by the Luftwaffe using the new Me 262s and air-to-air rockets. The U.S. Eighth Air Force lost six Mustangs and 13 bombers while the Luftwaffe only lost two planes in return despite being outnumbered 32 to 1. However, the Allies still dropped 3,000 tons of bombs in the heaviest daylight raid on Berlin of the war.[7][23]
  • The Battle of Kolberg ended in Soviet and Polish victory.
  • The Battle of the Ligurian Sea was fought between British and German naval forces in the Gulf of Genoa. The Germans lost two torpedo boats and had a destroyer damaged while the British took light damage to one destroyer in return.
  • The Battle of the Visayas began in the Philippines.
  • All schools and universities in Tokyo were closed and everyone over the age of six was ordered to do war work.[24]
  • German submarine U-866 was depth charged and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean by American destroyer escorts.
  • Two days of parliamentary elections concluded in Finland. The Social Democratic Party of Finland lost 35 seats but maintained a one-seat plurality over the new Finnish People's Democratic League.

March 19, 1945 (Monday)Edit

  • The aircraft carrier USS Franklin was bombed and heavily damaged off the Japanese mainland by Japanese aircraft, killing more than 800 crew.
  • Hitler issued the Nero Decree, ordering the destruction of German infrastructure to prevent their use by Allied forces. Albert Speer and the army chiefs strongly resisted this and conspired to delay the order's implementation.[14]
  • All remaining U-boats in the Baltic Sea were withdrawn and transferred to the west.[25]
  • The Battle of Bacsil Ridge was fought between Japanese and Filipino forces, resulting in Filipino victory.
  • In Burma, the 19th Indian Division captured Mandalay while the British 36th Division took Mogok.[16]
  • The Soviet Union notified Turkey that their non-aggression pact signed in 1925 would not be renewed after it expired in November.[25] Turkey responded by rejecting Soviet demands for territorial concessions and a revision of the Montereaux Convention.[26]

March 20, 1945 (Tuesday)Edit

March 21, 1945 (Wednesday)Edit

  • British aircraft executed Operation Carthage, an air raid on Copenhagen, Denmark. The Danish headquarters of the Gestapo was destroyed but a nearby boarding school was also hit and the raid caused a total of 125 civilian deaths.
  • The Allies executed Operation Bowler, an air attack on Venice harbour.
  • The Battle of West Henan–North Hubei began as part of the Second Sino-Japanese War.
  • The Japanese deployed the first Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka suicide aircraft, slung under 16 Betty bombers that were part of a group sent to attack the American fleet off Okinawa. The flight was a disaster for the Japanese when the group was intercepted by American fighters a full 60 miles from the American task force, and all the bombers were shot down. American pilots noted that the Bettys were flying unusually slow and carrying an unusual payload, but the significance of this was not realized at the time.[28]

March 22, 1945 (Thursday)Edit

March 23, 1945 (Friday)Edit

March 24, 1945 (Saturday)Edit

  • As part of Operation Plunder, American, British and Canadian troops carried out Operation Varsity, an airborne drop around Wesel, Germany.
  • It was reported from Cairo that archaeologists had located the ancient Egyptian city of Heliopolis.[29]
  • Billboard magazine revised its system for tabulating a chart of the leading songs in the United States with the creation of a new composite chart called the Honor Roll of Hits, combining best-selling retail records, records most played on the air and the most played jukebox records. "Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive" by Johnny Mercer was the first #1 of this new chart, which would exist until being supplanted by the creation of the Hot 100 in 1958.

March 25, 1945 (Sunday)Edit

March 26, 1945 (Monday)Edit

March 27, 1945 (Tuesday)Edit

March 28, 1945 (Wednesday)Edit

March 29, 1945 (Thursday)Edit

March 30, 1945 (Friday)Edit

March 31, 1945 (Saturday)Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Address to Congress on Yalta". Miller Center of Public Affairs. Archived from the original on March 17, 2016. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Doody, Richard. "A Timeline of Diplomatic Ruptures, Unannounced Invasions, Declarations of War, Armistices and Surrenders". The World at War. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  3. ^ "War Diary for Thursday, 1 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  4. ^ a b Ford, Ken (2000). The Rhineland 1945: The Last Killing Ground in the West. Osprey Publishing. p. 85. ISBN 978-1-85532-999-7.
  5. ^ "War Diary for Friday, 2 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  6. ^ Yust, Walter, ed. (1946). 1946 Britannica Book of the Year. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. p. 3.
  7. ^ a b "Timeline of the Air War, 1939–1945". PBS. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  8. ^ a b "War Diary for Monday, 5 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  9. ^ a b Chronology and Index of the Second World War, 1938–1945. Research Publications. 1990. p. 333. ISBN 978-0-88736-568-3.
  10. ^ a b c d "1945". MusicAndHistory.com. Archived from the original on September 23, 2013. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  11. ^ a b c Moseley, Ray (2004). Mussolini: The Last 600 Days of Il Duce. Taylor Trade Publishing. p. 372. ISBN 978-1-58979-095-7.
  12. ^ "Firebombing of Tokyo". History. A&E Networks. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  13. ^ a b "Conflict Timeline, March 4-13 1945". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Davidson, Edward; Manning, Dale (1999). Chronology of World War Two. London: Cassell & Co. pp. 238–240. ISBN 0-304-35309-4.
  15. ^ "War Diary for Sunday, 11 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  16. ^ a b c "1945". Burma Star Association. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  17. ^ Georg, Friedrich (2003). Hitler's Miracle Weapons, Volume I - The Luftwaffe and Kriegsmarine. Helion & Co Ltd. p. 48. ISBN 978-1-874622-91-8.
  18. ^ "War Diary for Wednesday, 14 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  19. ^ Martin, Robert Stanley (August 2, 2015). "Comics by the Date: January 1945 to June 1945". The Hooded Utilitarian. Archived from the original on November 30, 2015. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  20. ^ Catalog of Copyright Entries, Part 1, Group 2. Library of Congress. 1945. p. 326.
  21. ^ "March 1945". Franklin D. Roosebelt Day by Day. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  22. ^ a b "War Diary for Saturday, 17 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  23. ^ Boyne, Walter J. (2007). Beyond the Wild Blue: A History of the U.S. Air Force, 1947–2007. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. p. 461. ISBN 978-1-4299-0180-2.
  24. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 618. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  25. ^ a b "War Diary for Monday, 19 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  26. ^ a b "Chronology 1945". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  27. ^ a b "War Diary for Tuesday, 20 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  28. ^ "MXY7 Ohka, Japanese Suicide Aircraft". The Pacific War Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  29. ^ Leonard, Thomas M. (1977). Day By Day: The Forties. New York: Facts On File, Inc. p. 483. ISBN 0-87196-375-2.
  30. ^ Caddick-Adams, Peter (2015). Snow and Steel: The Battle of the Bulge, 1944–45. Oxford University Press. p. 669. ISBN 978-0-19-933514-5.
  31. ^ "Germans launch last of their V-2s". History. A&E Networks. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  32. ^ "War Diary for Wednesday, 28 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  33. ^ Ivie, Thomas G. (1981). Aerial Reconnaissance: The 10th Photo Recon Group in World War II. Aero Publishers. p. 147.
  34. ^ "War Diary for Friday, 30 March 1945". Stone & Stone Books. Retrieved March 28, 2016.

Anne and Margot Frank were given this date of death but their official death dates are unknown.