List of French flags

This list includes flags that either have been in use or are currently used by France, French Overseas Collectivites, the Sui Generis Collectivity and the French Overseas Territory.

The French Society of Vexillology is the authority on the flying of flags in France and maintains the only official register of flags for the country.[1] It was established in 1985 and as part of the Comité des travaux historiques et scientifiques operates under the authority of the Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation. The Breton Vexillology Society holds a similar role within Brittany.

List of French flags
Flag of France.svg
French ensigns
Regional flags
Breton flags
Corsican flags
Flags of Île-de-France
Occitan flags
Presidential Standards
Former French Empire


National flagsEdit

Flag Date Use Description
  1790–1794 National flag at the end of the Kingdom of France and the beginning of the French First Republic A vertical tricolour of red, white and blue (proportions 3:2)
  1794–1814 National flag of the First Republic and in the First French Empire.
First adopted on 15 February 1794
A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2).
  1814–1815 National flag of the Kingdom of France during the Bourbon Restoration Pure white flag with Bourbon coat of arms (proportions 3:2).
  1815 National flag of the French Empire in its short lived restoration during the Hundred Days A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2).
  1815–1830 National flag after the resumption of the Bourbon Restoration Kingdom of France Pure white flag with Bourbon coat of arms (proportions 3:2).
  1830–1848 National flag of the Kingdom of France after the July Revolution A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2).
  1848 National flag of the French Second Republic very briefly used between 24 February and 5 March A vertical tricolour of blue, red, and white (proportions 3:2).
  1848–present National flag of the French Second Republic, Second French Empire, French Third Republic, French State, Provisional Government of the French Republic, French Fourth Republic, and France today (a.k.a. the French Fifth Republic) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2).
  1958–present A brighter version of the flag often used in modern times A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2).

EnsignsEdit

Flag Date Use Description
  1790–1794 Naval ensign during the French Revolution A white flag with a bordered, first version of the French tricolore on the top-left honour quadrant
  1814,
1815-1830
French military naval ensign during the Bourbon Restoration 1814,1815-1830 A pure white flag
  1853–present Civil ensign and Naval ensign
Adopted on 17 May 1853, previous ensigns were the same as the national flag
A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red, but with bars in proportion 30:33:37

StandardsEdit

Flag Date Use Description
  1880–Present The Presidential and Prime Minister Standard of France A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1).
  1880–Present The Presidential and Prime Minister Standard of France (variant) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2).
  Flag of the Minister of Overseas A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) on a blue ensign.
  1880–1958 Flag of the Governor Colony A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red on swallow tail blue ensign. (proportions 1:2).

Military flagsEdit

Flag Date Use Description
  Flag of the Minister of the Armed Forces A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with a golden emblem.
  Pennant
  10 August 1939 Flag of the Chief of the Defence Staff Originally the marque of the Chief of the National Defence.[2]
  10 August 1939 Flag of the Chief of Staff of the French Army Marque given to the chief of staff.[2]
  10 August 1939 Flag of the Chief of Staff of the French Navy Marque given to the chief of staff.[2]
  10 August 1939 Flag of the Chief of Staff of the French Air Force Marque given to the chief of staff.[2]
  10 August 1939 Flag of the Admiral of the French Navy
  10 August 1939 Flag of the Vice-Admiral D'escadre of the French Navy
  Flag of the Vice-Admiral of the French Navy
  Flag of the Contre-Admiral of the French Navy
  Flag of the Capitaine de Vaisseau of the French Navy (Division)
  Flag of the Capitaine de Vaisseau of the French Navy (Unit)
  Flag of the Harbour Commanding Officer
  Flag of the Senior Merchant Navy Captain in the harbour

Regional and territorial flagsEdit

Historical flagsEdit

Royal banners and ensignsEdit

Flag Date Use Description
  10th century–12th century Banner of the Kingdom of France
  12th century–13th century Banner of the Kingdom of France
  14th century–16th century Banner of the Kingdom of France
1124–1356 Oriflamme
1124–1356 Oriflamme (variant)
  1365–1794 The Royal Banner of early modern France or "Bourbon Flag" was the most commonly used flag in New France.|[3][4][5][6]
  1365–1792,
1815–1830
Flag of the Kingdom of France & the Bourbon Restoration
  1365–1792 Merchant flag
  1789–1799 Flag of royalists during the revolution
  14 July 1790 Revolutionist flag
  21 January 1793 Revolutionist flag
  7 May 1794 Revolutionist flag

StandardsEdit

Flag Date Use Description
  1365–1792 Royal standard
  1804–1815 Imperial standard
  1870–1873 Imperial standard
  1873–1879 Imperial standard
  1879–1887 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red, proportions 1:1.
  1887–1894 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "C".
  1894–1895 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "CP".
  1895–1899 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "FF".
  1899–1906 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "EL".
  1906–1913 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "AF".
  1913–1920 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "RP".
  1920 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "PD".
  1920–1924 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "AM".
  1924–1931 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "GD".
  1931–1932 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "PD".
  1932–1940 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "AL".
  1940–1944 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the axe and 7 golden stars.
  1940–1944 Presidential standard (variant) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2) with the axe and 7 golden stars.
  1947–1954 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "VA".
  1954–1958 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "RC".
  1958-1959 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "RC".
  1959–1969 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "CG" and the red Cross of Lorraine.
  1959–1969 Presidential standard (variant) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2) with the red Cross of Lorraine.
  1969–1974 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "GP".
  1969–1974 Presidential standard (variant) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2) with the golden "GP".
  1974 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "AP".
  1974 Presidential standard (variant) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2) with the golden "AP".
  1974–1975 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1).
  1974–1975 Presidential standard (variant) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2).
  1975–1981 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden fasces.
  1975–1981 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:3) with the golden fasces.
  1981 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "FM".
  1981 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden "FM".
  1981 Presidential standard (variant) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 3:2) with the golden "FM".
  1982–1995 Presidential standard A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden oak tree.
  1982–1995 Presidential standard (variant) A vertical tricolour of blue, white, and red (proportions 1:1) with the golden oak tree.

Other historical flagsEdit

Flag Date Use Description
 
 
1871 Revolutionary banner from the Paris Commune A plain red flag

Colonial flagsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "adhésion et renouvellement". French Society of Vexillology. Retrieved 22 December 2016. La Société française de vexillologie (SFV) est ouverte sans condition de nationalité à quiconque s’intéresse à l’étude des drapeaux et des pavillons sous tous leurs aspects (usage, histoire, symbolisme, fabrication, etc.) et adhère aux règles et principes énoncés dans ses statuts.
  2. ^ a b c d "Marques, honneurs, saluts et visites dans les forces navales et à bord des bâtiments de la marine militaire". gallica.bnf.fr (in French). 10 August 1939. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  3. ^ New York State Historical Association (1915). Proceedings of the New York State Historical Association with the Quarterly Journal: 2nd-21st Annual Meeting with a List of New Members. The Association. It is most probable that the Bourbon Flag was used during the greater part of the occupancy of the French in the region extending southwest from the St. Lawrence to the Mississippi , known as New France... The French flag was probably blue at that time with three golden fleur - de - lis ....
  4. ^ "Fleur-de-lys | The Canadian Encyclopedia". www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca. At the time of New France (1534 to the 1760s), two flags could be viewed as having national status. The first was the banner of France — a blue square flag bearing three gold fleurs-de-lys. It was flown above fortifications in the early years of the colony. For instance, it was flown above the lodgings of Pierre Du Gua de Monts at Île Sainte-Croix in 1604. There is some evidence that the banner also flew above Samuel de Champlain’s habitation in 1608. ..... the completely white flag of the French Royal Navy was flown from ships, forts and sometimes at land-claiming ceremonies.
  5. ^ "INQUINTE.CA | CANADA 150 Years of History ~ The story behind the flag". inquinte.ca. When Canada was settled as part of France and dubbed "New France," two flags gained national status. One was the Royal Banner of France. This featured a blue background with three gold fleurs-de-lis. A white flag of the French Royal Navy was also flown from ships and forts and sometimes flown at land-claiming ceremonies.
  6. ^ W. Stewart Wallace (1948). The Encyclopedia of Canada, Vol. II, Toronto, University Associates of Canada. pp. 350–351. During the French régime in Canada, there does not appear to have been any French national flag in the modern sense of the term. The "Banner of France", which was composed of fleur-de-lys on a blue field, came nearest to being a national flag, since it was carried before the king when he marched to battle, and thus in some sense symbolized the kingdom of France. During the later period of French rule, it would seem that the emblem...was a flag showing the fleur-de-lys on a white ground.... as seen in Florida. There were, however, 68 flags authorized for various services by Louis XIV in 1661; and a number of these were doubtless used in New France

External linksEdit