Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Album

The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Album is an award that was first presented in 1959.

Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Album
Awarded forquality instrumental jazz albums
CountryUnited States
Presented byNational Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded1959
Currently held byChick Corea, Christian McBride & Brian Blade, Trilogy 2 (2021)
Websitegrammy.com

HistoryEdit

From 1959 to 2011, the Award was called Best Instrumental Jazz Album, Individual or Group. In 2012, it was shortened to Best Jazz Instrumental Album, encompassing albums that previously fell under the categories Best Contemporary Jazz Album and Best Latin Jazz Album (both defunct as of 2012).[1] A year later, the Best Latin Jazz Album category returned, disallowing albums in that category to be nominated for Best Jazz Instrumental Album.

Years listed indicate the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year. Before 1962 and from 1972 to 1978, the award title did not specify instrumental performances and was presented for instrumental or vocal performances. The award has had several name changes.

Name changesEdit

  • 1959–1960: Best Jazz Performance, Group
  • 1961: Best Jazz Performance Solo or Small Group
  • 1962–1963: Best Jazz Performance Solo or Small Group (Instrumental)
  • 1964: Best Instrumental Jazz Performance – Soloist or Small Group
  • 1965–1966: Best Instrumental Jazz Performance – Small Group or Soloist
  • 1967: Best Instrumental Jazz Performance – Group or Soloist with Group
  • 1968–1971: Best Instrumental Jazz Performance, Small Group or Soloist with Small Group
  • 1972–1978: Best Jazz Performance by a Group
  • 1979–1992: Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Group
  • 1993–2000: Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Individual or Group
  • 2001–2011: Best Jazz Instrumental Album, Individual or Group

RecipientsEdit

 
1959 winner Count Basie.
 
1960 award-winner Jonah Jones.
 
Two-time winner André Previn.
 
Two-time winner Stan Getz.
 
1966 award-winner Ramsey Lewis.
 
Two-time winner Wes Montgomery.
 
1968 award-winner Cannonball Adderley (left).
 
Five-time winner Bill Evans.
 
1973 winner Freddie Hubbard.
 
Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen won the award in 1975 alongside Oscar Peterson and Joe Pass.
 
Thirteen-time winner Chick Corea.
 
Three-time winner Gary Burton.
 
Three-time winner Phil Woods.
 
1985 winner Art Blakey.
 
Three-time winner Oscar Peterson.
 
Two-time winner Branford Marsalis.
 
Two-time winner McCoy Tyner.
 
Four-time winner Michael Brecker.
 
Two-time winner John Scofield.
 
Four-time winner Wayne Shorter.
 
Three-time winner Pat Metheny.
Year[I] Performing artist(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1959 Count Basie Basie
1960 Jonah Jones I Dig Chicks
1961 André Previn West Side Story
1962 André Previn Plays Songs by Harold Arlen
1963 Stan Getz Desafinado
1964 Bill Evans Conversations with Myself
1965 Stan Getz Getz/Gilberto
1966 Ramsey Lewis The In Crowd
1967 Wes Montgomery Goin' Out of My Head
1968 Cannonball Adderley Mercy, Mercy, Mercy! Live at 'The Club'
1969 Bill Evans Bill Evans at the Montreux Jazz Festival
1970 Wes Montgomery Willow Weep for Me
1971 Bill Evans Alone
1972 Bill Evans Trio The Bill Evans Album
1973 Freddie Hubbard First Light
1974 Supersax Supersax Plays Bird
1975 Joe Pass, Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen, Oscar Peterson The Trio
1976 Chick Corea & Return to Forever No Mystery
1977 Chick Corea The Leprechaun
1978 Phil Woods The Phil Woods Six – Live from the Showboat
1979 Chick Corea Friends
1980 Chick Corea & Gary Burton Duet
1981 Bill Evans We Will Meet Again
1982 Chick Corea & Gary Burton Chick Corea & Gary Burton in Concert - Zurich, October 28, 1979
1983 Phil Woods "More" Live
1984 At the Vanguard
1985 Art Blakey New York Scene
1986 Wynton Marsalis Black Codes (From the Underground)
1987 J Mood
1988 Marsalis Standard Time, Vol. I
1989 Roy Haynes, Cecil McBee, David Murray, Pharoah Sanders, McCoy Tyner Blues for Coltrane: A Tribute to John Coltrane
1990 Chick Corea Chick Corea Akoustic Band
1991 Oscar Peterson Trio The Legendary Oscar Peterson Trio Live at the Blue Note
1992 Saturday Night at the Blue Note
1993 Branford Marsalis I Heard You Twice the First Time
1994 Joe Henderson So Near, So Far (Musings for Miles)
1995 Ron Carter, Herbie Hancock, Wallace Roney, Wayne Shorter, Tony Williams A Tribute to Miles
1996 McCoy Tyner Trio & Michael Brecker Infinity
1997 Michael Brecker Tales from the Hudson
1998 Charlie Haden & Pat Metheny Beyond the Missouri Sky (Short Stories)
1999 Herbie Hancock Gershwin's World
2000 Gary Burton, Chick Corea, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland and Pat Metheny Like Minds [2]
2001 Branford Marsalis Contemporary Jazz [3]
2002 Sonny Rollins This Is What I Do [4]
2003 Herbie Hancock, Michael Brecker and Roy Hargrove Directions in Music: Live at Massey Hall [5]
2004 Wayne Shorter Alegría [6]
2005 McCoy Tyner with Gary Bartz, Terence Blanchard, Christian McBride and Lewis Nash Illuminations
2006 Wayne Shorter Beyond the Sound Barrier [7]
2007 Chick Corea The Ultimate Adventure [8]
2008 Michael Brecker Pilgrimage [9]
2009 Chick Corea & Gary Burton The New Crystal Silence [10]
2010 Chick Corea & John McLaughlin Five Peace Band Live [11]
2011 James Moody Moody 4B
[11]
2012 Corea, Clarke & White Forever
[12]
2013 Pat Metheny Unity Band
[13]
2014 Terri Lyne Carrington Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue [14]
2015 Chick Corea Trilogy [15]
2016 John Scofield Past Present [16]
2017 John Scofield Country for Old Men [17]
2018 Billy Childs Rebirth
[18]
2019 Wayne Shorter Quartet Emanon
[19]
2020 Brad Mehldau Finding Gabriel [20]
2021 Chick Corea (posthumous), Christian McBride & Brian Blade Trilogy 2
[21]
2022 Ron Carter, Jack DeJohnette and Gonzalo Rubalcaba Skyline
[22]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Grammy Awards restructuring
  2. ^ "42nd Annual Grammy Awards Nominations Coverage". Digital Hit. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  3. ^ "43rd Annual Grammy Awards Nominations Coverage". Digital Hit. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  4. ^ "Complete list of Grammys nominees". CBS News. January 4, 2002. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  5. ^ "Grammys 2003: complete list". FoxNews. January 3, 2003. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  6. ^ "46th Annual GRAMMY Awards Final Nominations List" (PDF). www.dolanart.com. 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 25, 2012. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  7. ^ "Complete list of Grammy Award nominations". USA Today. Gannett Company. December 8, 2005. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  8. ^ "Grammys 2007: clist (part 1)". Variety. February 7, 2007. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  9. ^ Variety Staff (6 December 2007). "50th annual Grammy Awards nominations". variety.com. Retrieved 1 March 2013.
  10. ^ "Grammys 2009 - Nominees and Winners". Music Lovers Group. February 9, 2009. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  11. ^ a b "2011 Grammy Awards- complete list of nominees". LA Daily News. Los Angeles Newspaper Group. February 12, 2010. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  12. ^ "Grammys Awards 2012: Complete Winners and Nominees List". The Hollywood Reporter. Prometheus Global Media. February 12, 2012. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  13. ^ "Grammys 2013: complete list of nominees and winners". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. February 10, 2013. Retrieved March 1, 2013.
  14. ^ "2014 Nominees" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-12-16. Retrieved 2022-02-12.
  15. ^ List of Nominees 2015
  16. ^ "58th Grammy Nominees". Grammy. Archived from the original on February 1, 2012. Retrieved December 7, 2015.
  17. ^ List of Nominees 2017
  18. ^ Grammy.com, 28 November 2017
  19. ^ Grammy.com, 7 December 2018
  20. ^ "2019 Grammy Winners & Nominees". Grammy. Retrieved July 15, 2020.
  21. ^ 2021 Nominations List
  22. ^ Grammy.com, 23 November 2021