Canada at the Pan American Games

Canada has competed at every edition of the Pan American Games since the second edition of the multi-sport event in 1955. As of the last Pan American Games in 2019, Canada is third on the all time medals list, only behind the United States and Cuba.[1] Canada is also one of nine countries to have competed at the only Winter Pan American Games, and only of one two (the other being the United States) to win a medal at the games.

Canada at the
Pan American Games
Flag of Canada.svg
IOC codeCAN
NOCCanadian Olympic Committee
Medals
Ranked 3rd
Gold
491
Silver
721
Bronze
855
Total
2,067
Pan American Games appearances (overview)

Medal countEdit

1 Hosting edition

To sort the tables by host city, total medal count, or any other column, click on the   icon next to the column title.

SummerEdit

 Year   Ref.  Edition Host city # of athletes[2]  Rank  Gold Silver Bronze Total
1951 [3] I   Buenos Aires Did not participate
1955 [4] II   Mexico City 24 5th 4 4 3 11
1959 a [5] III   Chicago 177 5th 5 19 24 48
1963 b [6] IV   São Paulo 134 3rd 11 27 26 64
1967 c [7] V   Winnipeg 1 438 2nd 17 39 50 106
1971 d [8] VI   Cali 319 3rd 19 20 41 80
1975 e [9] VII   Mexico City 343 3rd 19 35 40 94
1979 f [10] VIII   San Juan 451 3rd 24 43 71 138
1983 g [11] IX   Caracas 376 3rd 18 44 47 109
1987 h [12] X   Indianapolis 469 3rd 30 56 75 161
1991 [13] XI   Havana 457 3rd 22 46 59 127
1995 [14] XII   Mar del Plata 470 3rd 47 61 69 177
1999 [15] XIII   Winnipeg 1 618 3rd 64 52 80 196
2003 i [16] XIV   Santo Domingo 421 3rd 29 57 42 128
2007 [17] XV   Rio de Janeiro 468 4th 39 44 55 138
2011 [18] XVI   Guadalajara 492 5th 30 40 49 119
2015 [19] XVII   Toronto 1 713 2nd 78 70 71 219
2019 [20] XVIII   Lima 477 4th 35 64 53 152
Total j 3rd 491 721 855 2,067
Notes
  • ^a Some sources appoint 7 gold medals, 21 silver medals and 28 bronze medals, instead of 5, 19 and 24, respectively. This would result in a total of 56 medals earned during the 1959 Games, instead of 48.[21][22]
  • ^b Some sources appoint 10 gold medals and 25 bronze medals, instead of 11 and 26, respectively. This would result in a total of 62 medals earned during the 1963 Games, instead of 64.[22][23]
  • ^c Some sources appoint 12 gold medals, 37 silver medals and 43 bronze medals, instead of 17, 39 and 50, respectively. This would result in a total of 92 medals earned during the 1967 Games, instead of 106.[22][24]
  • ^d Some sources appoint 42 bronze medals, instead of 41. This would result in a total of 81 medals earned during the 1971 Games, instead of 80.[22][25]
  • ^e Some sources appoint 18 gold medals and 38 bronze medals, instead of 19 and 40, respectively. This would result in a total of 94 medals earned during the 1975 Games, instead of 91.[22][26]
  • ^f Some sources appoint 70 bronze medals, instead of 71. This would result in a total of 137 medals earned during the 1979 Games, instead of 138.[22][27]
  • ^g Some sources appoint 22 gold medals, 42 silver medals and 55 bronze medals, instead of 18, 44 and 47, respectively. This would result in a total of 119 medals earned during the 1983 Games, instead of 109.[22][28]
  • ^h Some sources appoint 57 silver medals, instead of 56. This would result in a total of 162 medals earned during the 1987 Games, instead of 161.[22][29]
  • ^i Some sources appoint 41 bronze medals, instead of 42. This would result in a total of 127 medals earned during the 2003 Games, instead of 128.[22]
  • ^j According to those sources, the historical medal table for Canada counts 455 gold medals, 655 silver medals and 802 bronze medals, instead of 456, 656 and 801, respectively. This would result in a total number of 1912 Pan American medals.

WinterEdit

 Year   Ref.  Edition Host city  Rank  Gold Silver Bronze Total
1990 [30] I   Las Leñas 2nd 2 4 1 7
Total 2nd 2 4 1 7

Flag bearersEdit

Opening ceremoniesEdit

Flag bearers carry the national flag of their country at the opening ceremony of the Pan American Games.

# Event year Flag bearer Sport References
18 2019 Scott Tupper Field hockey [31][32]
17 2015 Mark Oldershaw Canoeing [33]
16 2011 Christine Sinclair Football (soccer) [34]
15 2007 Susan Nattrass Shooting [35]
14 2003 Jaret Llewellyn Water skiing [36]
13 1999 Tanya Dubnicoff Cycling [37]
12 1995 Paul Chohan Field hockey [35]
11 1991 Lorraine Stubbs Equestrian (Dressage) [35]
10 1987 Nancy Charlton Field hockey [35]
9 1983 Brad Farrow Judo [38]
8 1979 Sylvia Sweeney Basketball [39]
7 1975
6 1971 Henri Corbeil Baseball [40]
5 1967 George Puce Athletics (track and field) [41]
4 1963
3 1959
2 1955


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ All time medals list Archived February 23, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Kidd, Bruce; Field, Russell (7 March 2016). "Canada and the Pan-American Games". The International Journal of the History of Sport. 33 (1–2): 217–238. doi:10.1080/09523367.2016.1152960. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  3. ^ Buenos Aires 1951 (in Portuguese), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Brazilian Olympic Committee, retrieved November 1, 2011.[permanent dead link]
  4. ^ Mexico City, 1955 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  5. ^ Chicago, 1959 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  6. ^ São Paulo, 1963 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved October 30, 2011.
  7. ^ Winnipeg, 1967 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  8. ^ Cali, 1971 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  9. ^ Mexico City, 1975 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  10. ^ San Juan, 1979 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  11. ^ Caracas, 1983 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  12. ^ Indianapolis, 1987 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  13. ^ Havana, 1991 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  14. ^ Mar del Plata, 1995 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  15. ^ Winnipeg, 1999 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  16. ^ Santo Domingo, 2003 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  17. ^ Official Results of the XV Pan American Games (PDF), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Rio de Janeiro 2007 Organizing Committee, archived from the original (PDF) on July 4, 2012, retrieved November 9, 2009.
  18. ^ Guadalajara, 2011 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  19. ^ Toronto, 2015, archived from the original on July 13, 2015, retrieved July 27, 2015
  20. ^ Lima, 2019, retrieved August 23, 2019
  21. ^ Chicago - 1959 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Folha de S.Paulo, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i Pan Ams Timeline (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: R7.com, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  23. ^ São Paulo - 1963 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Folha de S.Paulo, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  24. ^ Winnipeg - 1967 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Folha de S.Paulo, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  25. ^ Cali - 1971 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Folha de S.Paulo, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  26. ^ Mexico City - 1975 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Folha de S.Paulo, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  27. ^ San Juan - 1979 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Folha de S.Paulo, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  28. ^ Caracas - 1983 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Folha de S.Paulo, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  29. ^ Indianapolis - 1987 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Folha de S.Paulo, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  30. ^ Las Leñas, 1990 (in Portuguese), São Paulo, Brazil: Universo Online, retrieved November 1, 2011.
  31. ^ "Field hockey captain Scott Tupper named Canada's Pan Am flag-bearer". Toronto Star. The Canadian Press. 23 July 2019.
  32. ^ "Scott Tupper tapped as Team Canada's Lima 2019 Opening Ceremony flag bearer" (Press release). Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Canadian Olympic Committee. 23 July 2019. Retrieved 25 July 2019.
  33. ^ Hossain, Asif (1 July 2015). "Mark Oldershaw to lead Team Canada at TO2015 as flag bearer". www.olympic.ca/. Canadian Olympic Committee. Retrieved 1 July 2015.
  34. ^ "Christine Sinclair named Pan Am Games flag bearer". CTV News. Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 4 October 2011. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  35. ^ a b c d Christie, James (21 June 2007). "Nattrass to lead Canadian Pan Am team". The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  36. ^ "Estamos Listos – Canada is Ready for the 2003 Pan American Games". www.olympic.ca/. Canadian Olympic Committee. 23 July 2003. Retrieved 16 July 2020. Who will be Canada’s flag bearer for the XIX Pan American Games? A three-time Pan American Team athlete, a six-time world champion, 11-time world record holder, and volunteer with “In the Wakes,” a program that helps underprivileged children reach their dreams. Jaret Llewellyn from water skiing will proudly lead his team into the stadium for the opening ceremonies on August 1.
  37. ^ Morris, Jim (24 July 2020). "Pan American Games open in Winnipeg". Canadian Press. Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Archived from the original on 3 March 2000. Retrieved 15 July 2020.
  38. ^ "Opening a fiestra at Snafu Games". The Vancouver Sun. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 15 August 1983. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  39. ^ "Sylvia Sweeney". www.olympic.ca/. Canadian Olympic Committee. Retrieved 16 July 2020. Won a bronze medal at the 1979 Pan American Games where was the Canadian team flag bearer
  40. ^ Levett, Bruce (31 July 1971). "New faces representing Canada in Pan-Am games". Red Deer Advocate. Red Deer Alberta, Canada. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  41. ^ "Rainstorm Mars Games' Opener". Calgary Herald. Calgary Alberta, Canada. 24 July 1967. Retrieved 16 July 2020.