The 920s decade ran from January 1, 920, to December 31, 929.

Events

920

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Byzantine Empire edit
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  • Emperor Taizu of the Khitan Empire orders the adoption of a written script by the Khitan, resulting in the creation of Khitan "Large Script."

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Climate edit

921

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922

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Byzantine Empire edit
  • Summer – Battle of Constantinople: Emperor Romanos I sends Byzantine troops to repel another Bulgarian raid at the outskirts of Constantinople. The Byzantines storm the Bulgarian camp, but are defeated when they are confronted by the main Bulgarian forces. Having won the battle, the Bulgarians lack the maritime power to conduct a successful siege of Constantinople.[9]
Europe edit

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Religion edit

923

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924

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925

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926

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927

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928

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929

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Births

920

921

922

923

924

925

926

927

928

929

Deaths

920

921

922

923

924

925

926

927

928

929

References edit

  1. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 563. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  2. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 314. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  3. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 675. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  4. ^ Domínguez-Castro, Fernando; Vaquero, José Manuel; Marín, Manuela; Gallego, María Cruz; García-Herrera, Ricardo. "How useful could Arabic documentary sources be for reconstructing past climate?" Weather 67(3): 76-82 doi:10.1002/wea.835 March 2012.
  5. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 241. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  6. ^ Knight, Judson. Ahmad ibn Fadlan: An Arab Among the Vikings of Russia. Science and Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol. 2: 700 to 1449. Detroit: Gale, 2001, pp. 32–34. Gale Virtual Reference Library.
  7. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 28.
  8. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 38.
  9. ^ "Synopsis of Histories by John Skylitzes" in GIBI, vol. VI, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, p. 252
  10. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 379. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  11. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 340. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  12. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 379. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  13. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 349. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  14. ^ Halm, Heinz (1991). Das Reich des Mahdi: Der Aufstieg der Fatimiden [The Empire of the Mahdi: The Rise of the Fatimids] (in German). Munich: C. H. Beck. p. 226. ISBN 978-3-406-35497-7.
  15. ^ Runciman, A history of the First Bulgarian Empire, pp. 169–172.
  16. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 543. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  17. ^ Halm, Heinz (1991). Das Reich des Mahdi: Der Aufstieg der Fatimiden [The Empire of the Mahdi: The Rise of the Fatimids] (in German). Munich: C. H. Beck. pp. 226–227. ISBN 3-406-35497-1.
  18. ^ Kennedy, Hugh (2004). The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates: The Islamic Near East from the 6th to the 11th Century (Second ed.). Harlow: Longman. pp. 191–192. ISBN 978-0-582-40525-7.
  19. ^ Rodriguez Fernández, Justiniao (1997). García I, Ordoño II, Fruela II, Alfonso IV. Burgos: Editorial La Olmeda. pp. 176–178. ISBN 84-920046-8-1.
  20. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999) The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 341. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  21. ^ Fine, John V. A. Jr. (1991) [1983]. The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. p. 157. ISBN 0-472-08149-7.
  22. ^ Fine, John V. A. Jr. (1991) [1983]. The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. p. 161. ISBN 0-472-08149-7.
  23. ^ Palmer, Alan; Palmer, Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 42–47. ISBN 978-0-7126-5616-0.
  24. ^ Kennedy, Hugh (2013). "The Reign of al-Muqtadir (295–320/908–32): A History". Crisis and Continuity at the Abbasid Court: Formal and Informal Politics in the Caliphate of al-Muqtadir (295-320/908-32). Leiden: Brill. pp. 13–47. ISBN 978-90-04-25271-4.
  25. ^ Barford, Paul M. (2001). The Early Slavs: Culture and Society in Early Medieval Eastern Europe. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. p. 421. ISBN 0-8014-3977-9.
  26. ^ Halm, Heinz (1991). Das Reich des Mahdi: Der Aufstieg der Fatimiden [The Empire of the Mahdi: The Rise of the Fatimids] (in German). Munich: C. H. Beck. pp. 214–215. ISBN 978-3-406-35497-7.
  27. ^ Abd-ar-Rahman III[dead link]
  28. ^ Spuler, Bertold; F.R.C. Bagley (December 31, 1981). The Muslim world: a historical survey, Part 4. Brill Archive. p. 252. ISBN 9789004061965.