2024 United States gubernatorial elections

United States gubernatorial elections will be held on November 5, 2024, in 11 states and two territories. The previous gubernatorial elections for this group of states took place in 2020, except in New Hampshire and Vermont where governors only serve two-year terms and will elect their governors in 2022.

2024 United States gubernatorial elections

← 2023 November 5, 2024 2025 →

13 governorships
11 states; 2 territories
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic

2024 Delaware gubernatorial election2024 Indiana gubernatorial election2024 Missouri gubernatorial election2024 Montana gubernatorial election2024 New Hampshire gubernatorial election2024 North Carolina gubernatorial election2024 North Dakota gubernatorial election2024 Utah gubernatorial election2024 Vermont gubernatorial election2024 Washington gubernatorial election2024 West Virginia gubernatorial election2024 Puerto Rico gubernatorial election2024 American Samoa gubernatorial election2024 United States gubernatorial elections.svg
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     Democratic incumbent      Term-limited or retiring Democrat
     Republican incumbent      Term-limited or retiring Republican
     Unknown incumbent
     New Progressive incumbent
     Nonpartisan
     No election

In addition to state gubernatorial elections, the territories of American Samoa and Puerto Rico will also hold elections for their governors.

The elections will take place concurrently with the 2024 presidential election, elections to the House of Representatives and Senate, and numerous state and local elections.

Race summaryEdit

StatesEdit

State Governor Party First elected Last race Status Candidates
Delaware John Carney Democratic 2016 59.5% D Term-limited
  • TBD
Indiana Eric Holcomb Republican 2016 56.5% R Term-limited
  • Eric Doden (Republican)[1]
Missouri Mike Parson Republican 2018[a] 57.1% R Term-limited
Montana Greg Gianforte Republican 2020 54.4% R Eligible
  • TBD
New Hampshire TBD in 2022
  • TBD
North Carolina Roy Cooper Democratic 2016 51.5% D Term-limited
  • TBD
North Dakota Doug Burgum Republican 2016 65.8% R Eligible
  • TBD
Utah Spencer Cox Republican 2020 63.0% R Running
Vermont TBD in 2022
  • TBD
Washington Jay Inslee Democratic 2012 56.6% D Eligible
  • TBD
West Virginia Jim Justice Republican 2016[b] 63.5% R Term-limited
  • Chris Miller (Republican)[5]

TerritoriesEdit

State Governor Party First elected Last race Status Candidates
American Samoa Lemanu Peleti Mauga Democratic[c] 2020 60.3% D Eligible
  • TBD
Puerto Rico Pedro Pierluisi New Progressive[d] 2020 32.9% NP Eligible
  • TBD

DelawareEdit

Governor John Carney was re-elected to a second term in 2020 with 59.5% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the Delaware Constitution in 2024 and cannot seek re-election for a third term.

IndianaEdit

Governor Eric Holcomb was re-elected to a second term in 2020 with 56.5% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the Indiana Constitution in 2024 and cannot seek re-election for a third consecutive term. Former president of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation Eric Doden is running for the Republican nomination.[1] United States Senator Mike Braun has announced an intention to seek the Republican gubernatorial nomination.[6]

MissouriEdit

Governor Mike Parson took office on June 1, 2018, upon the resignation of Eric Greitens and was elected to a full term in his own right in 2020 with 57.2% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the Missouri Constitution in 2024 and cannot seek re-election for a second full term. Lieutenant Governor of Missouri Mike Kehoe is running for the Republican nomination.[2]

MontanaEdit

Governor Greg Gianforte was elected in 2020 with 54.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

New HampshireEdit

Governor Chris Sununu is running for reelection to a fourth term in 2022. Because New Hampshire does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he will be eligible to run for re-election for a fifth term, should he win a fourth term in 2022.

North CarolinaEdit

Governor Roy Cooper was re-elected to a second term in 2020 with 51.5% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the North Carolina Constitution in 2024 and cannot seek re-election for a third consecutive term. Potential candidates include Democratic Attorney General of North Carolina Josh Stein and Republican Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina Mark Robinson.[7][8]

North DakotaEdit

Governor Doug Burgum was re-elected to a second term in 2020 with 65.8% of the vote. Because North Dakota does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he is eligible to run for re-election for a third term and has expressed interest in doing so.[9]

UtahEdit

Governor Spencer Cox was elected in 2020 with 63% of the vote and is running for reelection to a second term. Although Utah does not have gubernatorial term limits, he plans to only serve two terms.[3]

VermontEdit

Governor Phil Scott is running for reelection to a fourth term in 2022. Because Vermont does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he will be eligible to run for re-election for a fifth term, should he win a fourth term in 2022.

WashingtonEdit

Governor Jay Inslee was re-elected to a third term in 2020 with 56.6% of the vote. Because Washington does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he is eligible to run for re-election for a fourth term and has filed paperwork to do so.[10] Should Inslee retire, King County Executive Dow Constantine and Washington attorney general Bob Ferguson have been mentioned as a potential candidates.[11][12]

West VirginiaEdit

Governor Jim Justice was re-elected to a second term in 2020 with 63.5% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the West Virginia Constitution in 2024 and cannot seek re-election for a third consecutive term. Businessman and son of U.S. Representative Carol Miller, Chris Miller is running for the Republican nomination.[5] Additionally, auditor of West Virginia JB McCuskey has expressed interest in running for the Republican nomination.[13]

TerritoriesEdit

American SamoaEdit

Governor Lemanu Peleti Mauga was elected in 2020 with 60.3% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Puerto RicoEdit

Governor Pedro Pierluisi was elected in 2020 with 32.9% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Parson took office in 2018 after his predecessor (Eric Greitens) resigned. He was subsequently elected in the 2020 Missouri gubernatorial election.
  2. ^ Governor Jim Justice was originally elected as a Democrat before switching back to a Republican in 2017. Justice won re-election as a Republican in 2020.[4]
  3. ^ The governor of American Samoa is elected on a non-partisan basis, although individuals do affiliate with national parties, in Mauga's case with the Democratic Party.
  4. ^ Pierluisi affiliates with the Democratic Party on the national level.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Former state official announces 2024 gubernatorial run 3 years ahead of Election Day". Indy Star. May 6, 2021. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Mike Kehoe passes on 2022 Senate run to focus on 2024 Missouri governor's race". Missouri Independent. March 22, 2021. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  3. ^ a b McKellar, Katie (April 21, 2022). "Are Utah Republicans mad at Gov. Cox for transgender veto? Let political chips fall, he says". Deseret News. Retrieved April 25, 2022. Cox has said he does intend to run for reelection in 2024. On Thursday, he told reporters he stands by his pledge to only serve two terms.
  4. ^ Tatum, Sophie; Bradner, Eric; Merica, Dan (August 4, 2017). "Jim Justice of West Virginia governor announces plan to switch parties - CNN Politics". CNN.
  5. ^ a b Adams, Steven. "Chris Miller, Son of Congresswoman Carol Miller, Announces 2024 Run for West Virginia Governor". www.theintelligencer.net. The Intelligencer and Wheeling News Register. Retrieved 24 December 2021.
  6. ^ Hakim-Shabazz, Abdul (September 22, 2022). "Braun to Run for Governor". Indy Politics. Retrieved September 22, 2022.
  7. ^ "11 takeaways from the latest NC political fundraising". WRAL. August 3, 2021. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  8. ^ Fain, Travis (28 October 2021). "Lt. Gov. Robinson '95 percent sure' he's running for governor". WRAL.com. Retrieved 29 October 2021.
  9. ^ Notermann, Jacob. "Burgum not ruling out 3rd term". kfyrtv. Archived from the original on 2021-06-12. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  10. ^ "Commentary: Is It Too Early to Talk About the 2024 Election in Washington State? How About 2022?". The Chronicle. May 16, 2021. Retrieved August 27, 2021.
  11. ^ "King County Executive Dow Constantine holds wide lead in bid for 4th term". The Seattle Times. 2 November 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021. It would also provide him a platform to potentially run for governor in 2024, something he looked at doing in 2020 and has declined to rule out for the future.
  12. ^ "Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson touts legal wins as he faces GOP challenger Matt Larkin". The Seattle Times. October 19, 2020. Retrieved January 1, 2022. He is a likely candidate for governor once Gov. Jay Inslee leaves the office.
  13. ^ "Auditor McCuskey considers run for governor if conditions are right". 2 December 2021.