AIBA World Boxing Championships

The AIBA World Boxing Championships, and the AIBA Women's World Boxing Championships, are biennial amateur boxing competitions organised by the International Boxing Association (AIBA), which is the sport governing body.[1][2] Alongside the Olympic boxing programme, it is the highest level of competition for the sport. The championships was first held in 1974 Havana, Cuba as a men's only event and the first women's championships was held over 25 years later in 2001.[3]

AIBA World Boxing Championships
Statusactive
Genresports event
Date(s)varying
Frequencybiennial
Location(s)various
Inaugurated1974 (1974) (men)
2001 (2001) (women)
Organised byAIBA

Both championships are held separately on biennial schedules. Since 1989 the men's championships are held every odd year; the women's championships were held in even years between 2006 and 2018 and switched to odd years in 2019.

Men's editionsEdit

 
Cuban Felix Savon is the most successful boxer in the World Amateur Boxing Championships (Men's editions) of all time having won 6 gold medals as a heavyweight.

As of 1 August 2021, men are grouped into 13 weight classes as follows:[4]

Number Year Host Dates Venue Events
1 1974   Havana, Cuba 17–30 August Coliseo de la Ciudad Deportiva 11
2 1978   Belgrade, Yugoslavia 6–20 May Pionir Sports Hall[5] 11
3 1982   Munich, West Germany 4–15 May Olympiahalle[6] 12
4 1986   Reno, United States 8–18 May Reno-Sparks Convention Center 12
5 1989   Moscow, Soviet Union 17 September – 1 October Olympic Stadium 12
6 1991   Sydney, Australia 14–23 November State Sports Centre[7] 12
7 1993   Tampere, Finland 7–16 May Tampere Ice Stadium 12
8 1995   Berlin, Germany 4–15 May Deutschlandhalle 12
9 1997   Budapest, Hungary 18–26 October Budapest Sportcsarnok 12
10 1999   Houston, United States 15–29 August George R. Brown Convention Center 12
11 2001   Belfast, United Kingdom 3–10 June Odyssey Arena 12
12 2003   Bangkok, Thailand 6–13 July Nimibutr Stadium 11
13 2005   Mianyang, China 13–20 November Jiu Zhou Gymnasium 11
14 2007   Chicago, United States 23 October – 3 November UIC Pavilion 11
15 2009   Milan, Italy 1–12 September Mediolanum Forum 11
16 2011   Baku, Azerbaijan 22 September – 10 October Heydar Aliyev Sports 10
17 2013   Almaty, Kazakhstan 14–26 October Baluan Sholak Sports Palace 10
18 2015   Doha, Qatar 5–18 October Ali Bin Hamad al-Attiyah Arena 10
19 2017   Hamburg, Germany 25 August – 3 September Alsterdorfer Sporthalle 10
20 2019   Yekaterinburg, Russia 8–21 September Ekaterinburg Expo 8
21 2021   Belgrade, Serbia 25 October – 6 November Štark Arena 13
22 2023   Tashkent, Uzbekistan TBD
23 2025   Osaka, Japan Osaka Municipal Central Gymnasium

All-time medal table (1974–2021)Edit

Updated after the 2021 AIBA World Boxing Championships.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Cuba803528143
2  Russia26212269
3  United States [a]18131950
4  Soviet Union15111743
5  Kazakhstan14152251
6  Uzbekistan9151943
7  Bulgaria881935
8  Ukraine7121130
9  Romania751729
10  Azerbaijan741122
11  Italy631524
12  France561627
13  Germany462535
14  China31913
15  Hungary31610
16  Turkey241117
17  South Korea23813
18  Puerto Rico [a]2136
19  Japan2125
20  East Germany181524
21  Yugoslavia161017
22  England14914
23  Mongolia14611
24  Ireland13913
  Poland13913
26  Thailand1359
27  Armenia12710
28  Brazil1258
29  Russian Boxing Federation [b]1225
30  Georgia1168
31  Nigeria1135
32  Kenya1102
33  Morocco1023
34  Uganda1012
35  Venezuela05611
36  Belarus03710
37  Philippines0336
38  Finland0325
39  North Korea0257
40  Algeria0224
  Netherlands0224
42  India0167
43  Canada0145
44  Lithuania0134
45  Argentina0123
Thailand Boxing Federation [c]0123
  Wales0123
48  Croatia0112
  Ecuador0112
50  West Germany0066
51  Australia0055
  Egypt0055
53  Sweden0044
54  Czech Republic0033
  Tajikistan0033
56  Dominican Republic0022
  Norway0022
  Serbia and Montenegro0022
  Slovakia0022
  Spain0022
61  Albania0011
  Belgium0011
  Cameroon0011
  Colombia0011
  Costa Rica0011
  Czechoslovakia0011
  Denmark0011
  Ghana0011
  Great Britain0011
  Iran0011
  Mexico0011
  New Zealand0011
  Pakistan0011
  Panama0011
  Scotland0011
  Serbia0011
  Trinidad and Tobago0011
Totals (77 nations)235233470938
Notes

Multiple gold medalistsEdit

Boldface denotes active amateur boxers and highest medal count among all boxers (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

Rank Boxer Country Weights From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Félix Savón   Cuba 91 kg 1986 1999 6 1 7
2 Julio César La Cruz   Cuba 81 kg / 92 kg 2011 2021 5 1 6
3 Juan Hernández Sierra   Cuba 67 kg 1991 1999 4 1 5
4 Lázaro Álvarez   Cuba 56 kg / 60 kg / 57 kg 2011 2019 3 2 5
5 Serafim Todorov   Bulgaria 54 kg / 57 kg 1989 1995 3 1 4
Zou Shiming   China 48 kg / 49 kg 2003 2011 3 1 4
7 Francisc Vaștag   Romania 67 kg / 71 kg 1989 1995 3 1 4
8 Roberto Balado   Cuba +91 kg 1989 1993 3 3
Andy Cruz   Cuba 64 kg / 63 kg / 63.5 kg 2017 2021 3 2
Adolfo Horta   Cuba 54 kg / 57 kg / 60 kg 1978 1986 3 3
Mario Kindelán   Cuba 60 kg 1999 2003 3 3
Magomedrasul Majidov   Azerbaijan +91 kg 2011 2017 3 3
Odlanier Solís   Cuba 91 kg / +91 kg 2001 2005 3 3
Teófilo Stevenson   Cuba +81 kg / +91 kg 1974 1986 3 3

Women's editionsEdit

As of 1 August 2021, women are grouped into 12 weight classes as follows:[4]

Number Year Host Dates Venue Events
1 2001   Scranton, United States 24 November – 2 December 12
2 2002   Antalya, Turkey 21–27 October 12
3 2005   Podolsk, Russia 26 September – 2 October Vityaz Ice Palace 13
4 2006   New Delhi, India 18–23 November Talkatora Indoor Stadium 13
5 2008   Ningbo, China 22–29 November Ningbo Sports Center 13
6 2010   Bridgetown, Barbados 10–18 September Garfield Sobers Gymnasium 10
7 2012   Qinhuangdao, China 21 May – 3 June 10
8 2014   Jeju City, South Korea 13–25 November Halla Gymnasium 10
9 2016   Astana, Kazakhstan 19–27 May 10
10 2018   New Delhi, India 15–24 November KD Jadav Indoor Stadium 10
11 2019   Ulan-Ude, Russia 3–13 October 10
12 2022   Istanbul, Turkey 12-27 March 12

All-time medal table (2001–2019)Edit

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Russia [a]24112560
2  China [b]18151750
3  India981936
4  North Korea871025
5  United States792238
6  Canada721726
7  Turkey681428
8  Ireland6118
9  Kazakhstan54918
10  Italy44311
11  France43411
12  Ukraine371020
13  Hungary351119
14  Sweden32611
15  Chinese Taipei3025
16  Philippines22711
17  Brazil2024
18  England16411
19  Romania14813
20  Poland13610
21  Bulgaria1225
22  Belarus1124
23  Germany1023
24  Great Britain1012
  Wales1012
26  Panama1001
27  Netherlands0347
28  Norway0314
29  Thailand0246
30  Argentina0224
31  Azerbaijan0213
32  Denmark0156
33  Australia0134
34  Greece0123
35  Colombia0101
  Jamaica0101
   Switzerland0101
38  Finland0044
39  Japan0033
40  Egypt0022
  South Korea0022
42  Moldova0011
  Mongolia0011
  Morocco0011
  New Zealand0011
  Tajikistan0011
  Tunisia0011
  Vietnam0011
Totals (48 nations)123122245490
Notes
  • ^[a] At the 2001 World Championships, Russian boxer Natalya Kolpakova (71 kg) finished at 2nd place but was disqualified afterwards and deprived of her silver medal which was not transferred to other athlete.
  • ^[b] At the 2008 World Championships, Chinese boxer Chen Ying (48 kg) originally won the gold medal but was disqualified for failing doping test. Gold medal in this weight category was reawarded to France, silver medal - to Russia, one bronze medal - to Sweden and other bronze medal was not awarded to any boxer.

Multiple gold medalistsEdit

Boldface denotes active boxers and highest medal count among all boxers (including these who are not included in these tables) per type. In 2018, Mary Kom defeated Ukrainian boxer Hanna Okhota with a 5–0 win in the 48 kg weight category, she is now tied with Cuban legend Felix Savon’s haul of six golds.[8][9]

Rank Boxer Country Weights From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Mary Kom   India 48 kg / 45 kg / 46 kg / 51 kg 2001 2019 6 1 1 8
2 Katie Taylor   Ireland 60 kg 2006 2016 5 1 6
3 Irina Sinetskaya   Russia 67 kg / 66 kg / 80 kg / +81 kg 2001 2012 3 1 1 5
4 Yang Xiaoli   China 81 kg / +81 kg 2014 2019 3 1 4
5 Mary Spencer   Canada 66 kg / 75 kg 2005 2010 3 1 4
6 Simona Galassi   Italy 51 kg / 50 kg 2001 2005 3 3
Ren Cancan   China 52 kg / 51 kg 2008 2012 3 3
8 Mária Kovács   Hungary 90 kg / 86 kg / 75 kg 2001 2010 2 2 1 5
9 Ariane Fortin-Brochu   Canada 70 kg / 75 kg 2005 2014 2 1 1 4
Anna Laurell   Sweden 75 kg 2001 2012 2 1 1 4
Sofya Ochigava   Russia 52 kg / 54 kg / 57 kg / 60 kg 2005 2012 2 1 1 4

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "AIBA World Boxing Championships". AIBA.org. International Boxing Association (AIBA). Archived from the original on 31 March 2016. Retrieved 27 March 2016.
  2. ^ "AIBA Women's World Boxing Championships". AIBA.org. International Boxing Association (AIBA). Archived from the original on 26 March 2016. Retrieved 27 March 2016.
  3. ^ "AIBA Boxing History – AIBA". AIBA. Archived from the original on 25 November 2018. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  4. ^ a b "AIBA increases number of weight categories for boxers". AIBA. 5 July 2021. Retrieved 2 October 2021.
  5. ^ "Sedam medalja na bokserskom prvenstvu sveta". strategija.org. Archived from the original on 2 May 2019. Retrieved 2 June 2018.
  6. ^ "Olympiahalle Veranstaltungshöhepunkte". olympiapark.de. Archived from the original on 10 December 2017. Retrieved 2 June 2018.
  7. ^ "1991: November 16–22". televisionau.com. Archived from the original on 22 September 2018. Retrieved 2 June 2018.
  8. ^ "Mary Kom wins record sixth World Championships gold". The Indian Express. 25 November 2018. Archived from the original on 25 November 2018. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  9. ^ "World Boxing Championships: Mary Kom wins record sixth gold medal, Sonia Chahal takes silver – Times of India". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 24 November 2018. Retrieved 25 November 2018.