Open main menu

Olympic Stadium (Moscow)

Olympic Stadium (Russian: Олимпийский стадион) (known locally as Olimpiyskiy) is an indoor arena, located in Moscow, Russia. It was built for the 1980 Summer Olympics and, divided into two separated halls, hosted the basketball and boxing events.[1]

Olimpiysky
Спортивный комплекс Олимпийский
Moscow 05-2017 img48 Olimpiysky Arena.jpg
Aerial view of the arena (c.2017)
Full nameOlympic Sports Complex
Address16 строение 1
Moscow 129090
Russia
LocationOlimpiyskiy Prospekt
Coordinates55°46′52″N 37°37′35″E / 55.78111°N 37.62639°E / 55.78111; 37.62639Coordinates: 55°46′52″N 37°37′35″E / 55.78111°N 37.62639°E / 55.78111; 37.62639
OwnerZAO Neftegazprod
Capacity35,000 (Main Arena)
5,000 (North Hall)
Construction
Broke ground1977
Opened19 July 1980 (1980-07-19)
Architect
Structural engineerV. I. Nadezhdin
General contractorGlavmospromstroy
Website
Venue Website

Contents

EventsEdit

SportsEdit

A part of the "Olimpiyskiy Sports Complex", it makes up one architectural ensemble with another venue, constructed at the same time, the Swimming Pool. Its capacity is 80,000 people. and the stadium can hold up to 16,000 people for televised events.[2]

In May 2014, the Government of Moscow auctioned 65% of shares in the stadium that it previously controlled. Oil company ZAO Neftegazprod won the auction, paying 4,672 billion rubles (approximately 100 million euros).[3]

 
A view during the 2015 World Fencing Championships on 15 July

Sporting events held at the stadium have included the Davis Cup finals and the Kremlin Cup tennis tournament.

It was the world's first indoor bandy arena, and has hosted the Bandy World Championships in 1989 (the first bandy world championship held indoors) and 2008.[4] When smaller indoor sports are held at the venue, such as tennis or basketball, only a quarter of the floor space is used. Capacity in this configuration can vary between 10,000 and 16,000 people.

The arena hosted the 1999 FIBA EuroStars game[5] and the 2005 Euroleague Final Four.[6]

The arena hosted the Eurovision Song Contest 2009, the first time Russia hosted the competition.

The 2013 European Artistic Gymnastics Championships were held in the stadium between 17–23 April 2013.

On September 15, 2018, the stadium hosted the first ever UFC event in Russia, UFC Fight Night: Hunt vs. Oliynyk.

Music eventsEdit

Main article: List of entertainment events at the Olimpiyskiy Stadium

SC Olympiyskiy is the largest indoor concert arena in Russia and one of the largest in Europe. Many international artists played concerts here as part of their world tours, such as 30 Seconds to Mars, Beyoncé, Britney Spears, Depeche Mode, Enrique Iglesias, George Michael, Imagine Dragons, Jamiroquai, Justin Bieber, Justin Timberlake, Kylie Minogue, Lady Gaga, Linkin Park, Madonna, Muse, Paul McCartney, Pink, Pink Floyd, Rihanna, Robbie Williams, Whitney Houston and more. The venue hosted the Eurovision Song Contest 2009, the first time Russia hosted the competition.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1980 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 67-71.
  2. ^ Eurovision Song Contest Serbia 2008 | News - Svante Stockselius met 2009 organisers in Moscow
  3. ^ Новым владельцем 65% акций СК "Олимпийский" стал "Нефтегазпрод" (in Russian). ITAR-TASS. 23 May 2014.
  4. ^ Russia grabs World Bandy Championship on YouTube
  5. ^ SEE YOU AT "OLYMPIJSKY" Archived 24 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ Final Four venue: Olympiysky Arena Archived 12 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine.

External linksEdit

Events and tenants
Preceded by
Montreal Forum
Montreal
Olympic Basketball tournament
Final Venue

1980
Succeeded by
The Forum
Los Angeles
Preceded by
Exhibition Hall
Düsseldorf
Davis Cup
Final Venue

1994 - 1995
Succeeded by
Mässan Hall
Malmö
Preceded by
Max Schmeling Halle
Berlin
FIBA Euro All star game
Venue

1999
Succeeded by
Final Venue
Preceded by
Palacio de Congresos de Maspalomas
Fed Cup
Final Four venue

2003
Succeeded by
Krylatskoe Sport Palace
Preceded by
Yad Eliyahu Sports Hall
Tel Aviv
Euroleague
Final Four
Venue

2005
Succeeded by
Sazka Arena
Prague
Preceded by
Sibamac Arena
Bratislava
Davis Cup
Final Venue

2006
Succeeded by
Memorial Coliseum
Portland
Preceded by
Budapest Sports Arena
Budapest
IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics
Venue

2006
Succeeded by
Luis Puig Palace
Valencia
Preceded by
Söderstadion
Stockholm
Bandy World Championship
Final Venue

1989
Succeeded by
Oulunkylä Ice Rink
Helsinki
Preceded by
Khimik Stadium
Kemerovo
Bandy World Championship
Final Venue

2008
Succeeded by
ABB Arena Syd
Västerås
Preceded by
Belgrade Arena
Belgrade
Eurovision Song Contest
Venue

2009
Succeeded by
Telenor Arena
Oslo