Talk:Filet mignon

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WikiProject class ratingEdit

This article was automatically assessed because at least one article was rated and this bot brought all the other ratings up to at least that level. BetacommandBot 03:17, 27 August 2007 (UTC)

Someone has given a rating to Wikiproject Food and Drink now and I just gave a rating to Wikiproject France. All ratings seem reasonable. Jason Quinn (talk) 20:08, 22 May 2011 (UTC)
  Resolved

Still need clarification on locationEdit

"If the short end" Im not sure which part of the tenderloin is the "short end" (that makes no sense) and why not have a picture of the tenderloin pointing out how the fillets are cut? There is much confusion on the internet as to where true fillet mignon is cut from the tenderloin.... whether it is any part of the tenderloin or just the "short end" wherever that is. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 208.68.234.14 (talk) 18:44, 7 October 2009 (UTC)

Judging only by the picture, I think that calling it the "narrow end" would probably be more accurate, but I'm not a butcher so I'm not going to change it right away. JDZeff (talk) 05:49, 17 February 2018 (UTC)

Disagree with French TranslationEdit

I disagree with the translation in the intro that filet mignon translates to dainty filet. Mignon translates more accurately to cute. The literal translation of filet mignon therefore is cute filet. Contextually, both convey the sense intended however, the literal translation is cute filet. My french teacher in high school said it weas called a cute filet because when you order it the first thing you think is, "Aw what a cute little filet." Obviously not worthy of being in the encyclopedia but it is amusing (always nice) and sort of kind of backs up my statement. Dachande (talk) 16:20, 15 February 2008 (UTC)

Agreed, filet mignon means a cute cut, or a cute (small) filet. The words filet mignon surely do not mean a "dainty filet". That's just retarded. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.23.28.153 (talk) 23:45, 14 December 2009 (UTC)

Plane filay?Edit

Is a snarky comment on ONE town in ONE state in ONE country of this big, bad world REALLY worth publishing here? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.80.163.46 (talk) 16:14, 2 May 2011 (UTC)

This comment is referring to this edit on May 2, 2011, which was quickly reverted. The reader is urged to BE BOLD and try to improve articles whenever they spot an obvious problem. Jason Quinn (talk) 19:58, 22 May 2011 (UTC)
  Resolved

American POV?Edit

The article seems skewed towards a US POV, though I'm not going to formally tag it at this stage. Nobody in the UK calls this cut 'filet mignon', it's a fillet steak. Most people wouldn't know what a 'filet mignon' was if a butcher tried to sell it to them. What is the usage in other English speaking countries? --Ef80 (talk) 11:11, 10 May 2011 (UTC)

Actually most people would know what "filet mignon" means since there is five(5) times as many people in the US than the UK. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.32.7.248 (talk) 16:59, 16 November 2011 (UTC)

There's also a great deal of obesity in the USA (35%?) and with such a low level of education a large potion of those know little but basic chain food. You know what he meant, and the article is still skewed towards the USA POV and is mostly unhelpful. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 85.210.203.124 (talk) 07:52, 6 June 2013 (UTC)

'Filet mignon' and 'tenderloin' is also common in Canada. So perhaps a North American POV. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 184.70.193.174 (talk) 18:28, 11 March 2015 (UTC)

No improvement in nearly 5 years, so I've added a globalize tag. --Ef80 (talk) 18:48, 22 September 2015 (UTC)

A thing that nobody seems to have noticed is that 'filet mignon' does not mean fillet steak in French. That's filet de bœuf. Filet mignon is a specific part of the fillet, and can be of pork, veal, beef or even venison. The French article goes into some detail about the problems that the American misconception causes. That should find its way into this article. Groogle (talk) 02:50, 9 July 2018 (UTC)

Bleu cheeseEdit

One of my favorite dinner meals is a filet mignon served with about a tablespoon of crumbled bleu cheese, variations of which seem to be widely available at many steak houses and restaurants. Is this also common outside North America? knoodelhed (talk) 07:29, 16 July 2011 (UTC)

No such thing as 'bleu cheese' outside North America. In francophone countries it's 'fromage a pate persillee' or 'fromage bleu' and in anglophone countries it's 'blue cheese'. And no, it's not normally served with fillet steak. --Ef80 (talk) 18:52, 22 September 2015 (UTC)

Spelling errorEdit

There is an obvious spelling error in the picture of the cow and various cuts.

Other names: "Chicken"Edit

Where the heck did that come from? I'm in the US, and I"ve never seen that used as a valid alternate-name... --TrekCaptainUSA (talk) 18:44, 24 August 2012 (UTC)

Better PlateEdit

Can we please get a more appetizing picture of the dish? The current one looks disgusting. 209.222.5.227 (talk) 04:12, 7 December 2013 (UTC)

Return to "Filet mignon" page.