Open main menu

The Romania national rugby union team (Romanian: Echipa națională de rugby a României), nicknamed The Oaks (Stejarii), is long considered one of the stronger European teams outside the Six Nations. They have participated in all but one Rugby World Cup and currently compete in the first division of the European Nations Cup, which they won most recently in 2017. Rugby union in Romania is administered by the Romanian Rugby Federation. The team plays in yellow and blue strips.

Romania
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Stejarii (The Oaks)
EmblemAn oak leaf
UnionFederaţia Română de Rugby
Head coachMarius Tincu
CaptainMihai Macovei
Most capsFlorin Vlaicu (118)
Top scorerFlorin Vlaicu (922)
Top try scorerCătălin Fercu (33)
Home stadiumArcul de Triumf Stadium
First colours
Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current18 (as of 17 March 2019)
Highest13 (2006)
Lowest20 (2019)
First international
Romania 0–21 United States
(Stade Pershing, Paris, France; 1 July 1919) All-military sides
Biggest win
Bulgaria 0–100 Romania
(Burgas, Bulgaria; 21 September 1976)
Biggest defeat
England 134–0 Romania
(London, England; 17 November 2001)
World Cup
Appearances8 (First in 1987)
Best resultOne Win, 1987, 1991, 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2015
Websitewww.frr.ro

France first played rugby against Romania in 1924 when they tried to establish a rival to the Five Nations championship. Although not regarded as a first-tier team in more recent times, their history includes wins against four (France, Italy, Scotland, Wales) of the Six Nations Championship teams.[1]

Romania have played in every Rugby World Cup as of 2015, with their best result being a win during the pool stages. However, the likes of Georgia have challenged Romania for top spot below the Six Nations in the European Nations Cup (or Six Nations B).

Contents

HistoryEdit

Early historyEdit

 
Romania versus France at the Inter-Allied Games of 1919

The game itself was introduced by students returning with rugby balls from their studies in Paris to form clubs such as Stadiul Roman from 1913 onwards. Seventeen other teams would be formed in the capital, Bucharest.

Romania's first international was played against the US in 1919. France first officially played rugby union against Romania in May 1924 when they tried to establish a rival to the Five Nations Championship (now the Six Nations). France were victorious by 59 points to 3.

Romania were one of three teams who entered the 1924 Olympics in Paris. France won 59–3, scoring 13 tries including four by the fine Stade Francais winger Adolphe Jaureguy. The USA then defeated Romania 39–0. Romania finishing third claimed the bronze medal. The Federaţia Română de Rugby was formed in 1931. In 1939 a team was formed in Braşov at an aircraft factory. This was the first team outside Bucharest.

Post-World War IIEdit

The communist regime used rugby union like it used other sports, as a propaganda tool during the Cold War with the West. Every international success was presented as a direct result of the righteousness of the communist rule and ideology. All the financial resources were directed toward the preparation of the national team to the detriment of domestic development. Top players were employed in the army or the police, whose sides CSA Steaua București and Dynamo practised six days a week in superb sporting centres. These infrastructures bred a talented national side.

A generation of French school trained coaches from late ’40s, and ’50s built a system and led the national team to success of the 1960s, ’70s and early ’80s. In this era Romania began to compete more regularly against the major nations. Their first win over France came in 1960 in Bucharest, in a tour match won by 11-5. In 1974 Romania won against France 15 – 10 in Bucharest,[2] and the FIRA – Association of European Rugby championship.[3] In 1975 Romania went for an 8-game tour to New Zealand, concluding in Wellington with a 10-10 draw against the Junior All Blacks. Exposure to international rugby developed the country's game and they began to form their own distinctive style of play, built around giant, bruising packs. That Romania was emerging as a real force on the world stage became clear on their 1979 Romania rugby union tour of Wales at Cardiff Arms Park in 1979 in an unofficial, non-cap international. The Oaks led going into the dying minutes, when only a last-gasp drop goal from Gareth Davies gave a narrow 13–12 victory for Wales. The improvement continued in 1980, when Romania crushed the French in a record 15–0 win in Bucharest. A trip to Lansdowne Road in the 1980 Romania rugby union tour of Ireland then yielded a 13–13 draw against Ireland in another unofficial, non-cap match.

In the 1980s the country boasted more than 12,000 players in 110 clubs. Home nations sides began to award international caps for matches against Romania in 1981; Scotland were the first to do so when Romania visited them on their 1981 tour, Scotland winning the international by 12 points to 6.[4] Wales travelled to Bucharest in November 1983 and were totally overwhelmed, falling to a 24–6 defeat. Romania's first win over Scotland came in Bucharest in 1984 and their first away win against Five Nations opposition came in 1988 against Wales; 15–9 at Cardiff Arms Park.

Their national side beat Wales (twice – 1983: 24–6 in Romania, 1988: 15–9 in Wales), Scotland (the 1984 Grand Slam side 28–22 in Romania), France (twice 1980: 15–0 in Romania, 1982: 13–9 in Romania) and drew with Ireland (13–13, in 1980, at Dublin). In 1981, they lost to the All Blacks 14–6 but had two tries disallowed. Many felt it was wrong for the rugby union powers to fail to bring them into top-flight competition. There are even rumours that the Oaks were invited to join but refused because the championship took place during their winter break. Romania beat Zimbabwe 21–20 in their first ever Rugby World Cup match in 1987 but did not win any other games and failed to progress beyond the group stage.

After the collapse of CommunismEdit

However, with the deterioration of the domestic political and economic situation in the country in the 1990s, Romanian rugby union suffered; the two leading rugby union teams – Dinamo Bucharest and Steaua Bucharest, represented the police and the army respectively, so their state funding fell.[citation needed]

Post-revolution, Romanian rugby union was still alive and kicking. In 1990 they recorded their best win to date by beating France 12–6 on French soil for the first time. The following year they beat Scotland 18–12. At the 1991 World Cup they beat Fiji 17–15 and as recently as the 1995 World Cup, Romania held the eventual winners South Africa to a highly respectable 21–8.

The professionalism that followed immediately upon the heels of that World Cup was the undoing of the sport in Romania. Approximately 200 Romanian players are thought to be playing in France and Italy. It wasn't just playing numbers that suffered, but a whole generation of potential referees and administrators was lost to the game. By 1994 Romania's rugby fortunes had declined sharply, when a Welsh team travelled to Bucharest for an uncapped international the visitors came away with a 16–9 win. In 1997 the Romanians toured Wales. They lost 36–21 to Wales A at Pontypridd and 70–21 in a test held in Wrexham. At the 1999 World Cup Romania could again only manage a single win 27–25 against the United States.[citation needed]

The new millenniumEdit

 
Romania versus Ireland at Lansdowne Road in 2005.

In 2000, Romania won the first European Nations Cup by a large margin, recording victories in all four matches. By 2001, Romania had been caught by the likes of Georgia who defeated them to take the 2001 European Nations Cup, crowned with a decisive 31–20 win over Romania in Bucharest. The national side lost to England by 134–0 in 2001 and Dinamo Bucharest lost 151–0 to Saracens in the European Rugby Shield. Several French-based players refused to turn up for the England debacle simply because their clubs refused to pay them for the week. Players in that Romanian squad were getting £30 a day in expenses while England's top earners scooped £6,000 for their afternoon's work.

In January 2002, Bernard Charreyre was appointed coach of the national team both supplied by and paid by the French Rugby Federation (FFR). Under Charreyre (known by The Oaks as 'Little Napoleon'), the Oaks’ decline has been stopped and the team has started to slowly climb from the basement of international rugby union. With a change of format in the European Nations Cup, Romania started in 2002 trailing Georgia due to the inclusion of 2001 results. The Oaks won all of the remaining five games, including a hard-fought 31–23 victory in Tbilisi to win the tournament. They qualified for the World Cup in 2003, where they beat Namibia and lost to Ireland (45–17), after an honourable display, and then to Australia (90–8) and Argentina (50–3). Charreyre was dismissed after the World Cup as the Romanian Federation was not satisfied by the World Cup performance and decided not to renew his contract. Three other French coaches followed: first, Phillipe Sauton, for a very short period, Robert Antonin as a temporary stand-in and then Daniel Santamans.

In the 2003–2004 European Nations Cup, Portugal were surprise 16–15 winners over Romania in Lisbon and installed themselves on the top of the 2003 table. In the second half of the competition, Romania seemed back on track (36–6 against Portugal in Constanţa), but went down 24–33 to Russia in Krasnodar following allegations of players having been doped. Then Portugal clinched their first title with a last-minute 19–18 win over Russia in Lisbon. In 2004, the Romanians scored a narrow 25–24 victory over Italy, their first victory to date over a Six Nations Championship side.

In 2005 Romania was given 'second tier' status by the IRB and replaced Russia in the Super Powers Cup. The USA beat a Romanian team stripped of their France-based players 23–16 in the third place play-off. The 2005–06 European Nations Cup also served as a qualifying group for the 2007 Rugby World Cup. Romania triumphed despite finishing level on points with Georgia.

Romania qualified for the 2007 Rugby World Cup in France, finishing at the top of their pool during the Round 5 of the European qualifying tournaments. Romania won their first qualifying match on October 7, defeating Georgia in Bucharest 20–8. Their 43–20 win over Spain in Madrid on October 14 ensured that they qualified directly for the World Cup in 2007. In June 2007, Romania hosted the IRB Nations Cup in Bucuresti.[5] In the 2007 Rugby World Cup finals, Romania won a bonus point in the 18–24 loss to Italy and to win a second game with Portugal by a narrow margin (14–10), but suffered heavy losses to Scotland (42–0) and New Zealand (85–8).

 
Romania national rugby union team after receiving the Pershing Trophy in 2016 at their home ground, Stadionul Arcul de Triumf after a test match against USA

On 21 March 2009, Romania lost 22–21 at home to Portugal, leaving them with an uphill struggle to qualify for the 2011 World Cup – qualification for which is determined by performances in the European Nations Cup in 2009 and 2010. Romania went unbeaten, with a draw at Russia, in the 2010 phase of the European Nations Cup. The Oaks' strong finish put them in third place and the final phase of the European qualification playoffs, in which they easily defeated Ukraine over two legs (94–10 on aggregate) for the European place in the Final Place Playoff for the 2011 Rugby World Cup. Romania emerged as the last qualifier for the 2011 Rugby World Cup in New Zealand by overcoming first Tunisia in a winner-takes-it-all game (56–13) and later Uruguay (60–33 on aggregate). Thus, the Oaks are one of only 12 teams to participate at all World Cups alongside New Zealand, Australia, England, France, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, Italy, Argentina, Canada, and Japan.

In November 2016, Romania achieved home soil wins against the US, Canada and Uruguay.[6]

In 2018, Romania finished top of the Rugby Europe Championship, meaning they qualified for the 2019 Rugby World Cup to be played in Japan in 2019. But after the conclusion of the tournament World Rugby conducted a review of player eligibility and found Romania fielded Sione Faka'osilea, who previously played for the Tonga Sevens team, which made him ineligible to play for Romania in the competition. Romania was stripped of 30 competition points, which placed them third and meant that they failed to qualify for the 2019 Rugby World Cup, with Russia taking their place.[7]

On 29 May 2018, it was confirmed that Romania had appealed the decision.[8] On 6 June, the appeal failed and the decision was upheld, meaning Russia was confirmed as Europe 1 and qualified for the World Cup, whilst Germany advanced to round 6.[9]

HonoursEdit

RecordEdit

Wins against Tier 1 nationsEdit

European competitionsEdit

Romania's only annual tournament is a competition involving Europe's tier 2 and tier 3 national teams. From 1936 through 1938, they competed in the FIRA Tournament against France, Germany and Italy. In 1965 till 1973 the FIRA Nations Cup was formed allowing other teams to be promoted or relegated from the competition. Romania won the competition once in 1969, being the only team to defeat France.

Pre– II WW Tournament (1936 – 1938)
Nation Games Points Table
points
Champs
played won drawn lost for against diff
  France 6 6 0 0 133 48 +85 3
  Germany 6 3 0 3 83 92 –9 0
  Italy 5 3 0 2 75 76 –1 0
  Romania 7 1 0 6 81 114 –33 0
  Belgium 2 1 0 1 20 48 –28 0
  Netherlands 2 0 0 2 8 62 –54 0
FIRA Nations Cup (1965 – 1973)
Nation Games Points Table
points
Champs
played won drawn lost for against diff
  France 26 25 0 1 824 198 +626 65 7
  Romania 26 17 1 8 528 222 +306 51 1
  Czechoslovakia 17 2 2 13 135 411 –267 16 0
  Morocco 9 2 0 7 65 332 –267 13 0
  Italy 13 4 1 8 86 227 –141 12 0
  West Germany 10 1 1 8 81 132 –51 6 0
  Spain 3 1 0 2 56 55 +1 5 0
  Poland 3 0 0 3 19 132 –113 3 0
  Portugal 3 0 0 3 23 108 –85 0 0

European Nations Cup (2000–present)Edit

WinnersEdit

Year First Division Lower Division Champions
Winner Second Third Relegated Division 2 Division 3
2000   Romania   Georgia   Morocco   Russia   Czech Republic
2001   Georgia   Romania   Russia   Poland Not played [11]
2001–2002   Romania   Georgia   Russia   Netherlands   Czech Republic[12]   Slovenia
2003–2004   Portugal   Romania   Georgia   Spain   Ukraine   Moldova
2004–2006   Romania   Georgia   Portugal   Ukraine   Spain   Latvia
2006–2008   Georgia   Russia   Romania   Czech Republic   Germany   Sweden
2008–2010   Georgia   Russia   Portugal   Germany [13]   Ukraine   Lithuania
2010   Romania   Georgia   Russia
2011   Georgia   Romania   Portugal   Ukraine [14]   Belgium   Sweden
2012   Georgia   Spain   Romania
2013   Georgia   Romania   Russia   Belgium [15]   Germany   Netherlands
2014   Georgia   Romania   Russia
2015   Georgia   Romania   Spain   Portugal   Belgium   Estonia
2016   Georgia   Romania   Russia
2017   Romania   Georgia   Spain -   Portugal   Czech Republic /   Malta
2018   Georgia   Russia   Germany -
2019   Georgia   Spain   Romania TBD TBD

All-time tableEdit

Pld W D L PF PA PD AVPPG Pts Champs
  Georgia 100 83 4 13 3096 1151 + 1945 30.96 334 11
  Romania 100 72 2 26 3024 1311 + 1713 30.24 288 5
  Russia 85 47 3 34 2190 1788 + 402 26.07 186 0
  Portugal 85 35 3 47 1605 1865 - 260 18.88 152 1
  Spain 80 25 4 51 1575 2020 − 445 19.69 145 0
  Czech Republic 29 6 0 23 362 1075 − 713 12.48 40 0
  Germany 25 3 1 21 341 1064 − 723 13.64 26 0
  Netherlands 15 1 0 14 278 652 − 374 18.53 17 0
  Ukraine 20 1 0 19 201 998 − 797 10.05 15 0
  Morocco 5 3 0 2 94 69 + 25 18.80 11 0
  Belgium 20 2 1 17 204 412 − 208 13.6 8 0
 
ENC champions

RivalriesEdit

Romania and Georgia have enjoyed a rivalry between the two most successful teams in the European Nations Cup. The winner of the rivalry takes home the Antim Cup.

Romania had competed in every Rugby World Cup since the inaugural tournament in 1987; that streak ended in 2018, when they were expelled from the 2019 tournament via points deduction for fielding ineligible players. Their best finish was with one win in 1987, 1991, 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2015. They lost all pool matches in 1995 and 2011. So far Romania has not hosted any World Cup games, but it may put in bids for future tournaments.

World Cup record World Cup Qualification record
Year Round P W D L F A P W D L F A
   1987 Pool stage 3 1 0 2 61 130 -
    1991 Pool stage 3 1 0 2 31 64 3 2 0 1 85 42
  1995 Pool Stage 3 0 0 3 14 97 4 2 0 2 105 46
  1999 Pool Stage 3 1 0 2 50 126 6 4 0 2 300 127
  2003 Pool Stage 4 1 0 3 65 192 2 1 0 1 84 31
  2007 Pool Stage 4 1 0 3 40 161 12 10 0 2 452 122
  2011 Pool Stage 4 0 0 4 44 169 12 8 1 3 376 142
  2015 Pool Stage 4 1 0 3 60 129 10 8 1 1 242 106
  2019 Expelled after qualification 8 6 0 2 296 106
Total 8/9 28 6 0 22 365 1068 57 41 2 14 1940 722

OverallEdit

Top 30 rankings as of 20 May 2019[16]
Rank Change* Team Points
1     New Zealand 092.54
2     Wales 089.96
3     Ireland 088.69
4     England 086.27
5     South Africa 084.58
6     Australia 082.40
7     Scotland 080.17
8     France 079.42
9     Fiji 077.95
10     Argentina 077.05
11     Japan 075.24
12     Georgia 074.42
13     Tonga 073.02
14     Italy 072.04
15     United States 071.71
16     Uruguay 069.09
17     Samoa 068.78
18     Romania 065.84
19     Spain 065.11
20     Russia 063.72
21     Canada 061.36
22     Portugal 060.50
23     Namibia 060.34
24     Brazil 059.05
25     Hong Kong 058.11
26     Netherlands 057.60
27     Belgium 057.35
28     Germany 055.79
29     Chile 054.04
30     South Korea 053.67
*Change from the previous week
Romania's historical rankings
 
Source: World Rugby - Graph updated to 7 January 2019[16]

Below is table of the representative rugby matches played by a Romania national XV at test level up until 23 November 2018.[17]

Opponent Played Won Lost Drawn Win % For Aga Diff
  Argentina 8 0 8 0 0.0% 117 325 −208
  Argentina XV 5 4 1 0 80.0% 113 74 +39
  Australia 3 0 3 0 0.0% 20 189 −169
  Belgium 7 7 0 0 100.0% 358 81 +277
  Brazil 1 1 0 0 100.0% 56 5 +51
  Bulgaria 2 2 0 0 100.0% 170 3 +167
  Canada 8 6 2 0 75.0% 138 142 −4
  Czech Republic 6 6 0 0 100.0% 307 53 +254
  Czechoslovakia 18 17 0 1 77.8% 349 105 +244
  East Germany 13 12 0 1 92.3% 393 69 +324
  England 5 0 5 0 0.0% 24 335 −311
  Fiji 3 1 2 0 33.3% 42 70 −28
  France 50 8 41 2 15.7% 473 1342 −869
  France A 1 0 1 0 0.0% 16 20 −4
  France XV 5 0 5 0 0.0% 30 153 −123
  Georgia 23 9 13 1 39.9% 381 435 −54
  Germany 11 6 5 0 54.5% 367 158 +209
  Ireland 9 0 9 0 0.0% 102 390 −288
  Ireland XV 1 0 0 1 0.0% 13 13 +0
  Emerging Ireland 1 0 1 0 0.0% 10 31 −21
  Italy 42 16 23 3 38.1% 634 609 +25
  Italy A 4 2 2 0 50.0% 65 87 −22
  Emerging Italy 2 2 0 0 100.0% 43 26 +17
  Japan 6 1 5 0 16.7% 119 152 −33
  Japan XV 1 1 0 0 100.0% 30 25 +5
  Morocco 8 7 1 0 87.5% 342 56 +286
  Namibia 6 5 1 0 83.3% 158 66 +92
  Netherlands 7 7 0 0 100.0% 296 46 +250
  New Zealand 2 0 2 0 0.0% 14 99 −85
  New Zealand XV 1 0 1 0 0.0% 30 60 −30
  Junior All Blacks 1 0 0 1 0.0% 10 10 +0
  Poland 16 14 2 0 87.5% 514 143 +371
  Portugal 24 21 3 0 87.5% 758 233 +525
  Russia 22 15 6 1 68.2% 545 309 +236
  Samoa 2 2 0 0 100.0% 49 37 +12
  Scotland 13 2 11 0 15.4% 192 475 −283
  Scotland A 1 0 1 0 0.0% 18 21 −3
  South Africa 1 0 1 0 0.0% 8 21 −13
  Emerging Springboks 2 0 2 0 0.00% 20 86 −66
  Soviet Union 15 12 3 0 80.0% 251 153 +98
  Spain 36 33 3 0 91.7% 1041 363 +678
  Tonga 3 1 3 0 33.3% 55 64 −9
  Tunisia 5 4 1 0 80.0% 189 42 +147
  Ukraine 7 7 0 0 100.0% 400 43 +357
  United States 9 2 7 0 22.2% 104 230 −126
  Uruguay 8 7 0 1 87.5% 226 85 +141
  Wales 8 2 6 0 25.0% 96 342 −246
  Wales XV 1 0 1 0 0.0% 12 13 −1
  West Germany 9 8 1 0 88.9% 199 69 +130
  Zimbabwe 4 4 0 0 100.0% 123 84 +39
Total 445 255 178 12 57.30% 9982 7976 +2006

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

On 28 May, Marius Ţincu announced a 26-man squad for the 2019 June rugby union tests.

Note: Caps correct as of 16 March 2019

Note: Flags indicate national union for the club/province as defined by World Rugby.

Player Position Date of birth (Age) Caps Club/province
Eugen Căpățână Hooker (1986-06-18) 18 June 1986 (age 33) 42   Timișoara Saracens
Ovidiu Cojocaru Hooker (1996-11-19) 19 November 1996 (age 22) 6   Baia Mare
Alex Gordaș Prop (1994-05-11) 11 May 1994 (age 25) 20   CSM Bucureşti
Iulian Harțig Prop (1998-10-11) 11 October 1998 (age 20) 3   CSM Bucureşti
Constantin Pristăviță Prop (1993-05-23) 23 May 1993 (age 26) 39   Baia Mare
Cosmin Manole Prop (1995-10-22) 22 October 1995 (age 23) 1   Dinamo Bucureşti
Alexandru Savin Prop (1995-10-22) 22 October 1995 (age 23) 3   CSM Bucureşti
Marius Antonescu Lock (1992-08-19) 19 August 1992 (age 26) 34   Colomiers
Dorin Lazăr Lock (1990-01-23) 23 January 1990 (age 29) 21   Timișoara Saracens
Ionuț Mureșan Lock (1994-10-06) 6 October 1994 (age 24) 5   Timișoara Saracens
Johannes van Heerden Lock (1986-12-09) 9 December 1986 (age 32) 38   Perpignan
Cristian Chirică Flanker (1997-04-09) 9 April 1997 (age 22) 9   Baia Mare
Adrian Ion Flanker (1986-08-09) 9 August 1986 (age 32) 9   CSM Bucureşti
Vlad Neculau Flanker (1998-01-07) 7 January 1998 (age 21) 1   Timișoara Saracens
Mihai Macovei Number 8 (1986-10-29) 29 October 1986 (age 32) 83   Colomiers
Gabriel Rupanu Scrum-half (1997-09-28) 28 September 1997 (age 21) 0   Timișoara Saracens
Florin Surugiu Scrum-half (1984-12-10) 10 December 1984 (age 34) 78   Steaua Bucureşti
Daniel Plai Fly-half (1994-09-05) 5 September 1994 (age 24) 6   Steaua Bucureşti
Tudor Boldor Fly-half (1997-11-29) 29 November 1997 (age 21) 1   Steaua Bucureşti
Taylor Gontineac Centre (2000-07-16) 16 July 2000 (age 18) 0   Clermont Espoirs
Vlăduț Popa Centre (1996-03-27) 27 March 1996 (age 23) 10   Timișoara Saracens
Florin Vlaicu Centre (1986-07-26) 26 July 1986 (age 32) 118   CSM Bucureşti
Mihail Lămboiu Wing (1995-07-25) 25 July 1995 (age 23) 0   Baia Mare
Nicolas Onuțu Wing (1995-12-27) 27 December 1995 (age 23) 6   CSM Bucureşti
Dorin Manole Fullback (1986-08-05) 5 August 1986 (age 32) 25   Baia Mare
Robert Neagu Fullback (1991-07-20) 20 July 1991 (age 27) 2   Steaua Bucureşti

Notable playersEdit

 
Romania's current top point scorer and most capped player of all time, Florin Vlaicu.

The 1924 Romania Olympic team are the only Romanian inductee to have been inducted into the IRB Hall of Fame. Nicolae Mărăscu captained the famously Hall of Fame side. The highest point of Mărăscu's career was at the 1924 tournament earning Romanaia the Bronze medal. He played as a centre and had five caps, without ever scoring, since his first match, in 1919, a 48–5 loss to France, in Paris, for the Inter-Allied Games, and his last, at 22 May 1927, in a 21–5 win over Czechoslovakia, in Bratislava.

Iulian Dumitraș was Romania's main man. Dumitraș was known to be one of the Oaks' most gifted playmakers, with an accurate kicking boot and a penchant for sparking attacks. Having made his test debut in 2002, he went on to start in every match a Rugby World Cup 2007 in France, bringing plenty of experience to the nation. The then standing 1.88m and weighing in a 110 kg, Dumitraș was a punishing runner when he chimes into the line on attack, which he looked to do often, and he provided a solid and dependable last obstacle in defence.

Sorin Socol is regarded by many good judges as the then best player in the current squad and was one of the rocks of the Romanian forward pack. He has captained the most matches to date for Romania, between 2003 and 2011. A total of 61 tests, 36 of them were as captain. He captained Romania for the first time on 30 October 2003 during the 2003 Rugby World Cup match against Namibia. He went on and featured in the 2007 World Cup squad and eventually retired from all international rugby after the 2011 tournament. Socol had one of Romania's highest winning percentage as a captain of 63.88.

Florin Vlaicu is Romania's top ever point scorer and also the most capped player appearing in 104 tests so far. Vlaicu made his international debut in 2006 as a substitute against Ukraine. He played for Romania in the IRB Nations Cup and in their 2007 Rugby World Cup qualifying before appearing for them in the 2007 Rugby World Cup. He played two Tests at the World Cup as a substitute against both Scotland and the All Blacks. He also played at the 2011 and 2015 Rugby World Cups.

Cristian Petre is Romania's most recognized player after dominating the lock position for eleven years. He is one of Romania's most capped player with a total of 92 matches and a career span that started in 2001 against England and ended in 2012 against Italy. Petre has featured in three Rugby World Cups, first in 2003, going on to feature in 2007 and his last being in 2011. Petre has scored a total of six tries and had winning percentage of 55.43.

Cătălin Fercu is generally regarded as one of Romania's true global superstar of rugby union. Fercu is Romania's top try scorers. He had quickly made appearances on the international stage at a very young age and played against France and Scotland in the Autumn internationals in 2006. He also scored a try against the French. Fercu helped guide Romania to the 2007 Rugby World Cup as he played in the qualifier matches including the vital games against Georgia and Spain and scored a try against Spain in the game that sealed their qualification to the Rugby World Cup. Fercu was a late withdrawal from their Rugby World Cup squad in 2011 because he was not prepared to fly all the way to New Zealand. The Romanian side arrived in Christchurch to prepare for their first game of the tournament against Scotland in Invercargill on 10 September without Fercu, who failed to get on the plane when it left Romania.

Another one of the Oaks greatest players are Romeo Gontineac, represented Romania in four Rugby World Cups from 1995 to 2007. The hard running centre, who became the national coach in 2010, was capped 75 times for the nation, scoring 13 tries and a drop goal. During his career he played professionally in Romania, South Africa and France.

Members of the 1924 Olympics teamEdit

Individual all-time recordsEdit

Most capsEdit

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Won Lost Draw %
1 Florin Vlaicu Centre 2006– 118 93 25 74 41 3 63.98
2 Cătălin Fercu Fullback 2005– 107 105 2 72 32 3 68.69
3 Valentin Calafeteanu Scrum-half 2004– 100 54 46 61 37 2 62.00
4 Cristian Petre Lock 2001–2012 92 83 9 50 40 2 55.43
5 Csaba Gál Centre 2005–2015 88 65 23 49 37 2 56.81
6 Mihai Macovei Flanker 2006– 83 73 10 49 33 1 59.63
7 Florin Surugiu Scrum-half 2008– 78 50 28 50 27 1 64.74
8 Romeo Gontineac Centre 1995–2008 76 75 1 35 41 0 46.05
Adrian Lungu Centre 1980–1995 76 75 1 40 36 0 52.63
Lucian Sîrbu Scrum-half 1996–2011 76 62 14 40 34 2 53.94

Last updated: Belgium vs Romania, 17 March 2019. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[18]

Most triesEdit

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Pts Tries
1 Cătălin Fercu Fullback 2005– 107 105 2 171 33
2 Gabriel Brezoianu Centre 1996–2007 71 67 4 142 28
3 Mihai Macovei Flanker 2006– 83 73 10 95 19
4 Ovidiu Toniţa Flanker 2000–2016 73 67 6 75 15
5 Petre Mitu Scrum-half 1996–2009 41 36 5 339 14
Cristian Săuan Wing 1999–2007 37 32 5 70 14
Marius Tincu Hooker 2002–2012 53 49 4 70 14
8 5 players on 13 tries

Last updated: Belgium vs Romania, 17 March 2019. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[19]

Most pointsEdit

# Player Pos Span Mat Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1 Florin Vlaicu Centre 2006– 118 922 11 164 178 4
2 Dănuţ Dumbravă Fly-half 2002–2015 73 389 3 73 74 2
3 Petre Mitu Scrum-half 1996–2009 41 339 14 55 53 0
4 Ionuţ Tofan Fly-half 1997–2007 60 316 12 53 46 4
5 Valentin Calafeteanu Scrum-half 2004– 100 233 11 32 37 1
6 Neculai Nichitean Fly-half 1990–1997 28 201 0 18 45 10
7 Cătălin Fercu Fullback 2005– 107 171 33 1 1 0
8 Gelu Ignat Fly-half 1986–1992 25 148 1 15 32 6
9 Gabriel Brezoianu Centre 1996–2007 71 142 28 1 0 0
10 Dumitru Alexandru Fly-half 1974–1990 48 119 3 4 25 8

Last updated: Belgium vs Romania, 17 March 2019. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[20]

Most matches as captainEdit

# Player Pos Span Mat Won Lost Draw % Pts Tries
1 Mihai Macovei Flanker 2012– 50 33 16 1 67.00 85 17
2 Sorin Socol Lock 2001–2011 36 22 12 2 63.88 25 5
3 Stelian Burcea Flanker 2009– 19 13 6 0 68.42 15 3
4 Mircea Paraschiv Scrum-half 1980–1987 18 7 10 1 41.66 16 4
5 Haralambie Dumitras Number 8 1989–1993 14 5 9 0 35.71 20 5
Romeo Gontineac Centre 1999–2003 14 4 10 0 28.57 5 1
7 Tiberiu Brînză Number 8 1994–1997 13 1 12 0 7.69 5 1
8 Marius Tincu Hooker 2007–2012 10 5 5 0 50.0 0 0
9 Costica Mersoiu Number 8 2007–2008 8 4 4 0 50.00 5 1
10 Alin Petrache Number 8 1999–2004 7 3 4 0 42.85 0 0

Last updated: Belgium vs Romania, 17 March 2019. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[21]

Most points in a matchEdit

# Player Pos Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Opposition Venue Date
1 Ionuţ Tofan Fly-half 32 2 8 2 0   Spain   Iași 05/10/2002
2 Virgil Popisteanu Fly-half 27 0 12 1 0   Portugal   Bucharest 13/04/1996
Petre Mitu Scrum-half 27 1 2 6 0   Portugal   Lisbon 04/02/2001
4 Ionel Rotaru Wing 25 5 0 0 0   Portugal   Bucharest 13/04/1996
5 Florin Vlaicu Fullback 24 1 8 0 1   Czech Republic   Bucharest 22/03/2008
Florin Vlaicu Centre 24 1 2 5 0   Russia   Bucharest 09/02/2013
7 Gelu Ignat Fly-half 22 0 5 4 0   Netherlands   Treviso 30/09/1990
Petre Mitu Scrum-half 22 1 4 3 0   Russia   Bârlad 18/03/2001
Ionuţ Tofan Fly-half 22 1 1 5 0   Russia   Krasnodar 24/03/2002
10 5 players on 21 points

Last updated: Belgium vs Romania, 17 March 2019. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[22]

Most tries in a matchEdit

# Player Pos Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Opposition Venue Date
1 Gheorgie Rascanu Flanker 20 5 0 0 0   Morocco   Bucharest 02/05/1972
Cornel Popescu Wing 20 5 0 0 0   Portugal   Bârlad 18/10/1986
Ionel Rotaru Wing 25 5 0 0 0   Portugal   Bucharest 13/04/1996
4 Petre Motrescu Wing 16 4 0 0 0   Italy   Bucharest 01/05/1977
Gheorghe Solomie Wing 20 4 0 0 0   Belgium   Brussels 04/10/1997
Lucian Colceriu Wing 20 4 0 0 0   Poland   Bucharest 02/05/1998
7 10 players on 3 tries

Last updated: Belgium vs Romania, 17 March 2019. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[23]

Notable clubsEdit

Media coverageEdit

Romania's Rugby Europe Championship matches, mid year tests and autumn internationals are currently televised by Telekom Sport.

Kit suppliersEdit

Between 2007 and 2011, Romania's kit were supplied by O'Neills. KooGa took over from there and have remained Romania's kit suppliers.

The current sponsor of Romania is CEC Bank. Former sponsors include Orange.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Men's International Rugby Union Teams beaten by Romania
  2. ^ http://www.espnscrum.com/statsguru/rugby/match/20798.html
  3. ^ 1974–1975 FIRA Trophy
  4. ^ Vivian Jenkins, ed. (1982). Rothmans Rugby Yearboook 1982-83. Rothmans Publications Ltd. p. 65. ISBN 0907574130.
  5. ^ "IRB". Archived from the original on 5 October 2013.
  6. ^ November gain or pain? Retrieved December 2016
  7. ^ "Russia qualify for 2019 Rugby World Cup after Romania, Belgium and Spain sanctioned for ineligible players". 16 May 2018. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  8. ^ Disciplinary update: Romania and Spain to appeal disputes committee outcomes
  9. ^ Independent Appeal Committee decision regarding Romania and Spain
  10. ^ {{cite web|url=http://www.rugbydata.com/romania/france/gamesplayed/%7Ctitle=Games played between Romania and France|author=|date=|website=
  11. ^ Was played the first round of 2003 Rugby World Cup – European qualification
  12. ^ Was played as the second round of 2003 Rugby World Cup – European qualification
  13. ^ relegation and promotion on two year based ranking
  14. ^ relegation and promotion on two year based ranking
  15. ^ relegation and promotion on two year based ranking
  16. ^ a b "Men's World Rankings". World Rugby. Retrieved 27 February 2019.
  17. ^ Romania statistics
  18. ^ http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_matches.html?id=12;type=team
  19. ^ http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_tries.html?id=12;type=team
  20. ^ http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_points.html?id=12;type=team
  21. ^ http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_matches_captain.html?id=12;type=team
  22. ^ http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_points_match.html?id=12;type=team
  23. ^ http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_tries_match.html?id=12;type=team
  24. ^ Museo del Rugby - N.1, Gabriel Vlad (Andrea Castellani)

SourcesEdit

External linksEdit