Provinces of Afghanistan

Afghanistan is made up of 34 provinces (ولايت, wilåyat). The provinces of Afghanistan are the primary administrative divisions. Each province encompasses a number of districts or usually over 1,000 villages.

Provinces of Afghanistan
Also known as:
Wilayat'
Afghanistan provinces numbered gray.PNG
CategoryUnitary state
LocationIslamic Republic of Afghanistan
Number34 provinces
Populations147,964 (Nuristan) – 4,372,977 (Kabul)
Areas1,840 km2 (711 sq mi) (Kapisa) – 58,580 km2 (22,619 sq mi) (Helmand)
GovernmentProvincial government, National government
SubdivisionsDistrict (Wulesswali)

Provincial governments are led by a governor who is appointed by the President of Afghanistan.[1] Each province is represented in the government of Afghanistan by two members in the House of Elders. One is elected by the provincial council to a four-year term while the second is elected by the district councils to a three-year term. Representation in the House of the People is directly from the districts, although in each province, two or more of the representatives must be women. They are appointed by the President of Afghanistan.

Provincial governors have played a critical role in the reconstruction of the Afghan state following the creation of the new government under Hamid Karzai.[2] According to international security scholar, Dipali Mukhopadhyay, many of the provincial governors are former warlords who have been incorporated into the political system.[2]

Provinces of AfghanistanEdit

 
Afghanistan political map- provinces named.
Provinces of Afghanistan[3]
Province Map # ISO 3166-2:AF[4] License Plate Code Centers Population (2015)[5] Area (km²) # Districts U.N. Region
Badakhshan 30 AF-BDS BDN Fayzabad 950,953 44,059 29 North East Afghanistan
Badghis 4 AF-BDG BDG Qala i Naw 495,958 20,591 7 West Afghanistan
Baghlan 19 AF-BGL BAG Puli Khumri 910,784 21,118 16 North East Afghanistan
Balkh 13 AF-BAL BLH Mazar-i-Sharif 1,325,659 17,249 15 North West Afghanistan
Bamyan 15 AF-BAM BAM Bamyan 487,218 14,175 7 West Afghanistan
Daykundi 10 AF-DAY DYK Nili 507,339 18,088 8 South West Afghanistan
Farah 2 AF-FRA FRH Farah 507,405 48,471 11 West Afghanistan
Faryab 5 AF-FYB FYB Maymana 998,147 20,293 14 North West Afghanistan
Ghazni 16 AF-GHA GAZ Ghazni 1,228,831 22,915 19 South East Afghanistan
Ghor 6 AF-GHO GHR Chaghcharan 790,296 36,479 11 West Afghanistan
Helmand 7 AF-HEL HEL Lashkargah 924,711 58,584 13 South West Afghanistan
Herat 1 AF-HER HRT Herat 1,890,202 54,778 15 West Afghanistan
Jowzjan 8 AF-JOW JZJ Sheberghan 540,255 11,798 9 North West Afghanistan
Kabul 22 AF-KAB KBL Kabul 4,372,977 4,462 18 Central Afghanistan
Kandahar 12 AF-KAN KRD Kandahar 1,226,593 54,022 16 South East Afghanistan
Kapisa 29 AF-KAP KPS Mahmud-i-Raqi 441,010 1,842 7 Central Afghanistan
Khost 26 AF-KHO KST Khost 574,582 4,152 13 South East Afghanistan
Kunar 34 AF-KNR KNR Asadabad 450,652 4,942 15 North East Afghanistan
Kunduz 18 AF-KDZ KDZ Kunduz 1,010,037 8,040 7 North East Afghanistan
Laghman 32 AF-LAG LGM Mihtarlam 445,588 3,843 5 East Afghanistan
Logar 23 AF-LOG LGR Pul-i-Alam 392,045 3,880 7 Central Afghanistan
Nangarhar 33 AF-NAN NGR Jalalabad 1,517,388 7,727 23 East Afghanistan
Nimruz 3 AF-NIM NRZ Zaranj 164,978 41,005 5 South West Afghanistan
Nuristan 31 AF-NUR NUR Parun 147,967 9,225 7 North East Afghanistan
Paktia 24 AF-PIA PAK Gardez 551,987 6,432 11 South East Afghanistan
Paktika 25 AF-PKA PKT Sharana 434,742 19,482 15 South East Afghanistan
Panjshir 28 AF-PAN PJR Bazarak 371,902 3,610 7 Central Afghanistan
Parwan 20 AF-PAR PRN Charikar 664,502 5,974 9 Central Afghanistan
Samangan 14 AF-SAM SAM Samangan 387,928 11,262 5 North West Afghanistan
Sar-e Pol 9 AF-SAR SRP Sar-e Pol 559,577 16,360 7 North West Afghanistan
Takhar 27 AF-TAK TAK Taloqan 983,336 12,333 16 North East Afghanistan
Urozgan 11 AF-URU ORZ Tarinkot 386,818 12,696 6 South West Afghanistan
Wardak 21 AF-WAR WDK Maidan Shar 596,287 9,934 9 Central Afghanistan
Zabul 17 AF-ZAB ZBL Qalat 304,126 17,343 9 South East Afghanistan

Former Provinces of AfghanistanEdit

 
Provinces of Afghanistan in 1929.


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ahmed, Azam (8 December 2012). "For Afghan Officials, Facing Prospect of Death Is in the Job Description". New York Times. Retrieved 18 June 2013.
  2. ^ a b Mukhopadhyay, Dipali (2014). "Building a Theory of Strongman Governance in Afghanistan". Warlords, Strongman Governors, and the State in Afghanistan. p. 43. doi:10.1017/cbo9781139161817.001. ISBN 9781139161817.
  3. ^ References and details on data provided in the table can be found within the individual provincial articles.
  4. ^ ISO 3166-2:AF (ISO 3166-2 codes for the provinces of Afghanistan)
  5. ^ Afghanistan at GeoHive

External linksEdit