Mexico City Metro Line 9

Mexico City Metro Line 9 is one of the 12 metro lines built in Mexico City, Mexico.

Line 9 / Línea 9
MetroDF Línea 9.svg
MP-68 en Linea 9.jpg
An MP-68 train at Pantitlán station
Overview
LocaleMexico City
Termini
Connecting lines
  • Mexico City Metro Line 1 Mexico City Metro Line 7 Tacubaya
  • Mexico City Metro Line 3 Centro Médico
  • Mexico City Metro Line 2 Mexico City Metro Line 8 Chabacano
  • Mexico City Metro Line 4 Jamaica
  • Mexico City Metro Line 1 Mexico City Metro Line 5 Mexico City Metro Line A Pantitlán (Out of service in Line 1)
  • Stations12
    Service
    TypeRapid transit
    SystemMexico City Metro
    Operator(s)Sistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
    Rolling stockNM-79, NC-82, NM-83, NE-92
    Ridership311,686 passengers per day (2019)[1]
    History
    Opened26 August 1987
    Technical
    Line length13.033 km (8 mi)
    Track length15.375 km (10 mi)
    Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in) standard gauge
    with roll ways along track
    ElectrificationGuide bars
    Operating speed36 km/h (22 mph)
    Route map

    proposed extension
    proposed extension
    Tacubaya
    Mexico City Metro Line 1 Mexico City Metro Line 7
    Patriotismo
    Chilpancingo
    Centro Médico
    Mexico City Metro Line 3
    Lázaro Cárdenas
    Chabacano
    Mexico City Metro Line 2 Mexico City Metro Line 8
    Jamaica
    Mexico City Metro Line 4
    Mixiuhca
    Velódromo
    Ciudad Deportiva
    Puebla
    Pantitlán
    Mexico City Metro Line 1 Mexico City Metro Line 5 Mexico City Metro Line A

    General informationEdit

    Line 9 was the 8th metro line to be built in the network, built between 1985 and 1988. (Line 8 started operations until 1994). It is identified by the color dark brown, and runs from East to West in an almost straight fashion. It was built in order to support Line 1, providing a redistribution alternative for east–west commuters.[2] It starts in the multi-line transfer station Pantitlán and ends at the western neighborhood of Tacubaya, both stations also served by Line 1. As a comparison, the section between Pantitlán and Tacubaya is served by 19 stations in Line 1, whereas Line 9 has only 12, which would translate in a faster alternative.

    Line 9 is built in its easternmost section above the Rio Churubusco and Rio de la Piedad Avenues. Then it reaches an underground route near the Magdalena Mixiuhca Complex and it continues under the Eje 3 Sur until reaching the Tacubaya zone, where the last station is built under Jalisco avenue. As part of the first expansion plans in the 1980s the line is expected to turn west after Jalisco Avenue to reach Observatorio Station.[3]

    ChronologyEdit

    • 26 August 1987: from Pantitlán to Centro Médico.
    • 29 August 1988: from Centro Médico to Tacubaya.

    Rolling stockEdit

    Line 8 has had different types of rolling stock throughout the years.

    As of 2020, out of the 390 trains in the Mexico City Metro network, 29 are in service in Line 9.[4]

    Station listEdit

    Key[a]
        Denotes a partially accessible station
        Denotes a fully accessible station
      Denotes a metro transfer
      Denotes a connection with the Centro de transferencia modal (CETRAM) system
      Denotes a connection with the Ecobici system
      Denotes a connection with the Metrobús system
      Denotes a connection with the Mexibús system
      Denotes a connection with the public bus system
      Denotes a connection with the Red de Transporte de Pasajeros (RTP) system
      Denotes a connection with the Trolleybus system

    The stations from west to east:

       
    No. Station Date opened Level Distance (km) Connection Pictogram Location
    Between
    stations
    Total Description
    01 Pantitlán    August 26, 1987 Elevated, overground access - 0.0
  •     Line 1 (out of service)
  •     Line 5
  •     Line A
  •   Pantitlán
  •     Line 4 (Alameda Oriente branch): Pantitlán station
  •     Line III: Pantitlán station (temporary Line 1 service)
  •   Route: 168 (temporary Line 1 service)
  •     Line 2: Pantitlán stop
  •   Routes: 11-B, 11-C, 19-F, 19-G
  • Pantitlán is a Nahuatl word that means between flags. In Aztec times, this place was part of Lake Texcoco. There was a culvert where the whirlpools came with such force that the canoes were carried away, so they fenced the place by putting up two posts, and as a warning to the navigators, the flags. The icon of the station represents two flags in reference to the navigation notices that the Aztecs placed in Lake Texcoco. Iztacalco / Venustiano Carranza
    02 Puebla    1.5 1.5
  •     Line 2: Puebla stop
  •   Routes: 9-D, 9-E, 19-E, 19-H
  • It is located in the Puebla district of the Iztacalco delegation of Mexico City; both the area it is located in and the station are named for the nearby city of Puebla. The station logo represents some angels, as the city is commonly called The City of Angels.
    03 Ciudad Deportiva    0.9 2.4
  •     Line 2: Ciudad Deportiva stop
  •   Route: 9-E
  • It is named for the nearby the Magdalena Mixhuca Sports City. The logo for the station represents a player engaged in a Mesoamerican ballgame (a similar logo is used for Metro Deportivo 18 de Marzo on lines 3 and 6).
    04 Velódromo    1.3 3.7
  •     Line 2: Velódromo stop
  •   Routes: 9-E, 14-A
  • It is named after the nearby Agustín Melgar Olympic Velodrome, or bicycle-racing venue, built for the 1968 Summer Olympics that were held in Mexico City. The logo for the station shows the silhouette of a bicycle racer.
    05 Mixiuhca Underground, trench 1.0 4.7
  •     Line 5: Mixiuhca station
  •     Line 2: Mixiuhca stop
  •   Route: 9-C, 9-E, 14-A
  • The station's icon is a silhouette of a woman holding a newborn baby. In the Nahuatl language mixiuhca means "place of births".
    06 Jamaica    0.9 5.6
  •     Line 4
  •     Line 2: Jamaica stop
  •   Route: 37
  •   Routes: 5-A, 9-C (at distance), 9-E (at distance), 14-A (at distance)
  • The station logo depicts an ear of corn. Its name refers to the nearby wholesale market of Jamaica.
    07 Chabacano    1.2 6.8
  •     Line 2
  •     Line 8
  •   Routes: 2-A, 31-B, 33, 111-A, 145-A
  •   Routes: 9-C, 9-E, 14-A, 17-C, 17-H, 17-I
  • The station's pictogram depicts an apricot and it was named after a previously existing street that had multiple apricot trees. Cuauhtémoc
    08 Lázaro Cárdenas 1.1 7.9
  •     Line 1: Lázaro Cárdenas stop
  •   Routes: 9-C, 9-E
  • It receives its name from the Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas which crosses the Eje 3 sur at that height. Lázaro Cárdenas del Río was president of Mexico from 1934 to 1940. He is famous for being the one who expropriated the foreign companies that extracted Mexican oil (Expropriation Petrolera). He was also the president who helped Spanish refugees during the Spanish Civil War. The station logo shows a portrait in profile of him.
    09 Centro Médico    1.2 9.1
  •     Line 3
  •  
  •     Line 3: Centro Médico station
  •   Routes: 9-C, 9-E
  • The station logo represents the caduceus, a variant of the Rod of Aesculapius, the Greek god of medicine. Its name refers to the Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI general hospital, located above the metro station.
    10 Chilpancingo    August 29, 1988 1.3 10.5
  •  
  •     Line 1: Chilpancingo station
  •   Routes: 9-C, 9-E
  • The station is named after the nearby Avenida Chilpancingo, which in turn is named after the city of Chilpancingo de los Bravo, the capital of the state of Guerrero. The station logo is the silhouette of a wasp since Chilpancingo means the place of the wasps in Nahuatl.
    11 Patriotismo    1.1 11.6
  •  
  •     Line 2: Patriotismo station
  •   Routes: 13-A, 115-A, 200
  •   Routes: 9-C, 9-E, 21-A
  • The station is named after Avenida Patriotismo which divides the Cuauhtémoc and Miguel Hidalgo boroughs. "Patriotismo" literally means patriotism, thus, the station logo depicts a Mexican flag. Cuauhtémoc / Miguel Hidalgo
    12 Tacubaya    1.3 12.8
  •     Line 1
  •     Line 7
  •   Tacubaya
  •   (at distance)
  •     Line 2: Tacubaya station
  •   Routes: 110, 110-B, 110-C, 112, 113-B, 115, 118, 119, 200
  •   Routes: 1-B, 9-C, 9-E, 21-A
  • The station takes its name from the neighborhood it is located in: Tacubaya. The origin of this zone of the city can be traced back to an Aztec settlement, which back then was at the edge of Lake Texcoco. The name Tacubaya is a Spanish barbarism that derived from the Nahuatl Atlacuihuayan, that means "where water joins". Therefore, the station pictogram represents a water bowl, that also resembles the glyph of the Aztec settlement of Tacubaya found at the Codex Mendoza. Miguel Hidalgo

    Proposed extensionEdit

    Being Tacubaya a provisional terminal, Line 9 had an original project for being expanded to the west to reach Observatorio station as Line 1 did. After the announcement for the Toluca–Mexico City commuter rail, an expansion towards Observatorio station was announced in 2014.[12] As of 2021, the project is still under planification.

    No. Station Date opened Situation Distance (km) Transfers Location
    Between
    stations
    Total
    13 Observatorio   To be determined Underground 1.5 14.3
  •     Line 1
  •     Line 12 (under construction)
  •   West Bus Terminal
  •   Observatorio
  •   Toluca–Mexico City commuter rail
    (under construction)
  •   Route: 21-D
  • Miguel Hidalgo

    RidershipEdit

    The following table shows each of Line 9 stations total and average daily ridership during 2019.[1]

    Transfer station
    †‡ Transfer station and terminal
    Rank Station Total ridership Average daily
    1 Pantitlán†‡ 32,839,328 89,971
    2 Tacubaya†‡ 16,335,719 44,755
    3 Chilpancingo 15,212,533 41,678
    4 Puebla 12,185,200 33,384
    5 Mixiuhca 6,694,736 18,342
    6 Patriotismo 6,628,532 18,160
    7 Centro Médico 5,143,782 14,093
    8 Jamaica 4,561,989 12,499
    9 Lázaro Cárdenas 4,363,376 11,954
    10 Chabacano 3,912,641 10,720
    11 Velódromo 3,288,845 9,011
    12 Ciudad Deportiva 2,598,847 7,120
    Total 113,765,528 311,686

    TourismEdit

    Line 9 passes near several places of interest:

    See alsoEdit

    NotesEdit

    1. ^ The following list was adapted from different websites and official maps.
      • Metro ( ) connections obtained from the official Mexico City Metro system map.[5]
      • Accessibility obtained from the Mexico City Metro system map. In some cases, the map omits the accessibility icon as the station(s) are actually partially accessible. However, the respective websites of each station on the official site indicate the respective accessibility methods. Stations with the symbol  ‡ are fully accessible; stations with the symbol  † are partially accessible.[5]
      • Centro de transferencia modal (CETRAM;  ) obtained from the official website of the Órgano Regulador de Transporte.[6]
      • Ecobici ( ) obtained from their official website.[7]
      • Metrobús ( ) obtained from the Mexico City Metrobús system map.[8]
      • Mexibús ( ) obtained from the official Mexico City Metro system map.[5]
      • Public buses network (peseros) ( ) obtained from the official website of the Órgano Regulador de Transporte.[9]
      • Red de Transporte de Pasajeros ( ) obtained from their official website.[10]
      • Trolleybuses ( ) obtained from their official website.[11]

    ReferencesEdit

    1. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2019" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
    2. ^ Treinta Años de Hacer el Metro, Ciudad de México. Grupo ICA. 1997. p. 277.
    3. ^ Treinta Años de Hacer el Metro, Ciudad de México. Grupo ICA. 1997.
    4. ^ "Parque vehicular" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
    5. ^ a b c "Mi Mapa Metro 22032021" [My Metro Map 22032021] (PDF) (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 22 March 2021. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    6. ^ "Centros de Transferencia Modal (CETRAM)" [Modal Transfer Centers] (in Spanish). Órgano Regulador de Transporte. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    7. ^ "Mapa de disponibilidad" [Disponibility map] (in Spanish). Ecobici. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    8. ^ "Mapa del sistema" [System map] (in Spanish). Mexico City Metrobús. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    9. ^ "Red de corredores" [Route network] (in Spanish). Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    10. ^ "Red de Rutas" [Routes network] (in Spanish). Red de Transporte de Pasajeros. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    11. ^ "Servicios" [Services] (in Spanish). Servicio de Transportes Eléctricos. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    12. ^ "Anuncia Mancera ampliación de Línea 9 del Metro". www.milenio.com.