Tacubaya metro station

Tacubaya is a station on Lines 1, 7 and 9 of the Mexico City Metro system.[2][3] It is located in the Miguel Hidalgo borough, west of the city centre.[2] In 2019, the station had a total average ridership of 85,800 passengers per day, making it the fifth busiest station in the network.[4]

Metro Tacubaya pictogram.svg Tacubaya
Mexico City Metro
STC rapid transit
Metro Tacubaya Line 1 Platforms.jpg
Line 1 platforms
General information
LocationTacubaya, Miguel Hidalgo
Mexico City
Mexico
Coordinates19°24′12″N 99°11′14″W / 19.403439°N 99.187102°W / 19.403439; -99.187102Coordinates: 19°24′12″N 99°11′14″W / 19.403439°N 99.187102°W / 19.403439; -99.187102
Operated bySistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Line(s)Mexico City Metro Line 1 (Observatorio - Pantitlán)
Mexico City Metro Line 7 (El Rosario - Barranca del Muerto)
Mexico City Metro Line 9 (Tacubaya - Pantitlán)
Platforms6 side platforms
Tracks6
ConnectionsMexico City Metrobús Line 2 icon.svg Tacubaya
Construction
Structure typeUnderground
ParkingNo
Bicycle facilitiesNo
Disabled accessPartial
Other information
StatusIn service
History
OpenedMexico City Metro Line 1 20 November 1970
Mexico City Metro Line 7 23 August 1985
Mexico City Metro Line 9 29 August 1988
Passengers
2021Total: 19,094,500
Mexico City Metro Line 1 7,381,863[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 7 1,144,856[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 9 10,567,781[1]Increase 0.22%
RankMexico City Metro Line 1 21/195[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 7 168/195[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 9 13/195[1]
Services
Preceding station Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Following station
Observatorio
Terminus
Line 1 Juanacatlán
toward Pantitlán
Constituyentes
toward El Rosario
Line 7 San Pedro de los Pinos
Terminus Line 9 Patriotismo
toward Pantitlán
Location
Tacubaya is located in Mexico City
Tacubaya
Metro Tacubaya pictogram.svg Tacubaya
Location within Mexico City
Area map

Name and pictogramEdit

The station takes its name from the neighborhood it is located in: Tacubaya. The origin of this zone of the city can be traced back to an Aztec settlement, which back then was at the edge of Lake Texcoco. The name Tacubaya is a Spanish barbarism that derived from the Nahuatl Atlacuihuayan, that means "where water joins".[2]

Therefore, the station pictogram represents a water bowl, that also resembles the glyph of the Aztec settlement of Tacubaya found at the Codex Mendoza.[2]

HistoryEdit

Service at this station began on 20 November 1970, when Line 1 was expanded westwards from Juanacatlán to Tacubaya.[5] On 22 August 1985, Metro Tacubaya became a transfer station, when the second stretch of Line 7 was inaugurated, from Auditorio to Tacubaya.[6] In 1988, Line 9 was connected to the station as part of the final stretch of Line 9, inaugurated on 29 August 1988, going from Centro Médico to Tacubaya, thus becoming the western terminus of the line.[7]

According to earlier plans for the metro, Line 9 was supposed to be extended towards Observatorio. This is the reason why on Line 9 platforms of Tacubaya signs stating that the station is a provisional terminal can be seen since its opening in 1988. In 2018, the Sistema de Transporte Colectivo announced plans to complete this expansion from Tacubaya to Observatorio.[8] Mexico City government announced shortly after that no works would be done during 2019; and as of early 2020, works still have not been started.[9]

March 2020 train crashEdit

 
The accident

On March 10, 2020, at about 23:37 local time (05:37 GMT), two trains crashed while both were going towards Observatorio station. The first train, No. 38, was parked at Tacubaya's platform when it was hit by another train, No. 33, that came in reverse at 70 kilometers per hour (43 mph).[10] According to official reports, 1 person died and 41 were injured,[11] all inside train No. 33; people in train No. 38 were evacuated moments before the crash.[10] Observatorio, Tacubaya and Juanacatlán stations were closed temporarily for repairs.[12] Authorities from the Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro believe the crash was caused due to a failure in the train systems coupled with a 7-degree slope that propelled train No. 33 for a kilometer (0.62 mi),[13] that occurred after performing a parking maneuver at Observatorio station.[10]

General informationEdit

The station was built on many levels, in order to accommodate the connecting lines. It has a maze of long, wide corridors between the lines' platforms, which are equipped with escalators. This station's exits connect with many zones of Tacubaya neighborhood, such as Parque Lira, a local market and the offices of the Miguel Hidalgo borough administration.[14]

Metro Tacubaya has facilities for the handicapped, four cultural displays, as well as a medical module and a cyber center where users can access internet through a computer; both services are free. The mural Del códice al mural by Guillermo Ceniceros can be found inside the station in Line 1 platforms.[2]

The station serves the neighborhood of the same name. It was in this area of Mexico City where the French pastry chef had his shop that was damaged in 1828, an incident that lead to the Pastry War a decade later.

RidershipEdit

NearbyEdit

  • Parque Lira, public park.
  • Museo Casa de la Bola, museum.
  • Museo Nacional de Cartografía, museum of cartography.
  • Alameda de Tacubaya, public plaza.

ExitsEdit

Line 1Edit

Line 7Edit

Line 9Edit

  • Northwest: Av. Jalisco and Manuel Dublan, Tacubaya
  • Northeast: Av. Jalisco and Iturbide, Tacubaya
  • Southeast: Av. Jalisco and Mártires de la Conquista, Tacubaya

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Afluencia de estación por línea 2021" [Station traffic per line 2021] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2022. Archived from the original on 7 March 2022. Retrieved 7 March 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Tacubaya" (in Spanish). Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  3. ^ Archambault, Richard. "Tacubaya » Mexico City Metro System". Retrieved 19 July 2011.
  4. ^ "Estaciones de mayor afluencia 2019" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Línea 1" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  6. ^ "Línea 7" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  7. ^ "Línea 9" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  8. ^ Sistema de Transporte Colectivo. "Plan Maestro del Metro 2018–2030" (PDF) (in Spanish). p. 49. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
  9. ^ "No se ampliará Línea 9 del Metro en 2019: Sheinbaum". El Big Data (in Spanish). 26 December 2018. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  10. ^ a b c Cruz, Héctor; Ruiz, Kevin (March 12, 2020). "Convoy se deslizó hacia atrás 70km/h: investigación". El Universal (in Spanish). Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  11. ^ "Mexico City subway crash leaves one dead, 41 injured". Radio France Internationale. 11 March 2020. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  12. ^ Stettin, Cinthya; Flores, Selene; Velázquez, César; Almazán, Jorge (March 11, 2020). "Chocan trenes del Metro en estación Tacubaya; hay 41 heridos y un muerto". Milenio (in Spanish). Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  13. ^ Navarrete, Shelma; Yañez, Brenda (March 11, 2020). "Una falla y una pendiente provocaron el accidente del Metro, dicen autoridades". Expansión (in Spanish). Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  14. ^ ".::Delegación Miguel Hidalgo::. Estamos para Servirte - Dirección Ejecutiva de Enlace Delegacional" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 27 July 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2011.
  15. ^ a b c d e "Afluencia de estación por línea 2020" [Station traffic per line 2020] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2021. Archived from the original on 21 June 2021. Retrieved 21 June 2021.
  16. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2019" [Station traffic per line 2019] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2020. Archived from the original on 8 April 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  17. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2018" [Station traffic per line 2018] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2019. Archived from the original on 6 June 2019. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  18. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2017" [Station traffic per line 2017] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2019. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  19. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2016" [Station traffic per line 2016] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2017. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  20. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2015" [Station traffic per line 2015] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2016. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  21. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2014" [Station traffic per line 2014] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2015. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  22. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2013" [Station traffic per line 2013] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  23. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2012" [Station traffic per line 2012] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2013. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  24. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2011" [Station traffic per line 2011] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2012. Archived from the original on 7 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  25. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2010" [Station traffic per line 2010] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2011. Archived from the original on 7 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.

External linksEdit