Mexico City Metro Line 1

Mexico City Metro Line 1 is one of the twelve metro lines operating in Mexico City, Mexico. Officially inaugurated in 1969, it went to become the first metro line to be built in the country. Its identifying color is pink and it runs through the city from west to east.

Line 1 / Línea 1
MetroDF Línea 1.svg
NM-16.jpeg
Observatorio terminal
Overview
LocaleMexico City
TerminiObservatorio
Pantitlán
Connecting lines
Stations20
Service
TypeRapid transit
SystemMexico City Metro
Operator(s)Sistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Rolling stockNM-83, NE-92, NM-16
Ridership665,171 passengers per day (2019)[1]
History
Opened4 September 1969
Technical
Line length16.654 km (10 mi)
Track length18.828 km (12 mi)
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in) standard gauge
with roll ways along track
ElectrificationGuide bars
Operating speed36 km/h (22 mph)
Route map

Observatorio yard
Observatorio
Mexico City Metro Line 12
Tacubaya
Mexico City Metro Line 7 Mexico City Metro Line 9
Juanacatlán
Chapultepec
Sevilla
Insurgentes
Cuauhtémoc
Balderas
Mexico City Metro Line 3
Salto del Agua
Mexico City Metro Line 8
Isabel la Católica
Pino Suárez
Mexico City Metro Line 2
Merced
Candelaria
Mexico City Metro Line 4
San Lázaro
Mexico City Metro Line B
Moctezuma
Balbuena
Boulevard Puerto Aéreo
Gómez Farías
Zaragoza
Zaragoza workshops
Pantitlán
Mexico City Metro Line 5 Mexico City Metro Line 9 Mexico City Metro Line A

General informationEdit

The line is built under several avenues: Parque Lira, Pedro Antonio de los Santos, Circuito Interior, Avenida de los Insurgentes, Avenida Chapultepec, Arcos de Belén, Balderas, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas, José María Izazaga, Isabel la Católica, Anillo de Circunvalación, Congreso de la Unión, Eduardo Molina, and Ignacio Zaragoza.

It commutes with Line 7 and 9 at the Station Tacubaya, Line 3 at Balderas, Line 8 at Salto del Agua, Line 2 at Pino Suárez, Line 4 at Candelaria, Line B at San Lázaro and Lines 5, 9 and A at Pantitlán. When Line 12 extension is completed, it will also connect with Line 12 at Observatorio.[2]

HistoryEdit

 
People waiting for the train on Chapultepec platform in the first day of operations of the subway, September 5, 1969.

The first section of Line 1 was opened on 4 September 1969 as part of Mexico City Metro's first construction stage, it was inaugurated by Gustavo Díaz Ordaz, President of Mexico from 1964 to 1970, and Alfonso Corona del Rosal, Regent of the Federal District Department.[3] The inauguration ceremony took place at the Insurgentes station.[4] The next day the line was opened to the public. To the original route ChapultepecZaragoza new station Juanacatlán was added to the west on 11 April 1970, and the first correspondencia (a transfer station) became functional on 1 August 1970, when Line 2 was opened. The two westernmost stations Tacubaya and current terminal Observatorio were inaugurated on 20 November 1970 and 10 June 1972 respectively.

Station Pantitlán was opened on 22 August 1984 as the eastern terminal during a fourth and final expansion. All twenty stations have operated since then, running a total track length of 18.83 km, of which 16.65 km are passenger track. The 1 is the only line in the network that is fully underground except for some surface track in Observatorio used for maintenance.

As of 2020, an extension of Line 12 is under construction, this stretch will connect Line 12 with Line 1 at the Observatorio station.[2]

Authorities warned on 10 August 2020 that Line 1 is in danger of a major fire due to an aging electrical system that is in need of major improvements. Lines 1, 2, and 3 report an average of 2.5 electrical failures daily.[5]

ChronologyEdit

  • September 4, 1969: from Chapultepec to Zaragoza.
  • April 11, 1970: from Chapultepec to Juanacatlán.
  • November 20, 1970: from Juanacatlán to Tacubaya.
  • June 10, 1972: from Tacubaya to Observatorio.
  • August 22, 1984: from Zaragoza to Pantitlán.

Rolling stockEdit

Line 1 has had different types of rolling stock throughout the years.

Currently, out of the 390 trains in the Mexico City Metro network, 49 are in service in Line 1.[6]

Station listEdit

Key[a]
    Denotes a partially accessible station
    Denotes a fully accessible station
  Denotes a metro transfer
  Denotes a connection with the Centro de transferencia modal (CETRAM) system
  Denotes a connection with the Ecobici system
  Denotes a connection with the Metrobús system
  Denotes a connection with the Mexibús system
  Denotes a connection with the public bus system
  Denotes a connection with the Red de Transporte de Pasajeros (RTP) system
  Denotes a connection with the Trolleybus system

The stations from west to east:

   
No. Station Date opened Level Distance (km) Connection Location
Between
stations
Total
01 Pantitlán    August 22, 1984 Underground
trench
- 0.0
  •     Line 5
  •     Line 9
  •     Line A
  •   Pantitlán
  •     Line 4 (Alameda Oriente branch): Pantitlán station
  •     Line III: Pantitlán station
  •   Route: 168
  •     Line 2: Pantitlán stop
  •   Routes: 11-B, 11-C, 19-F, 19-G
  • Venustiano Carranza
    02 Zaragoza    September 4, 1969 1.5 1.5
  •   Zaragoza
  •   Routes: 162B, 163, 163A, 163B, 164, 166, 167
  • 03 Gomez Farías    0.9 2.4
    04 Boulevard Puerto Aéreo    0.7 3.1
  •   Boulevard Puerto Aéreo
  •   Route: 43
  •     Line 4: Boulevard Puerto Aéreo stop
  •   Routes: 20-B, 22-D
  • 05 Balbuena    0.8 3.9
  •   Balbuena
  • 06 Moctezuma    0.8 4.7
  •     Line 4 Moctezuma station (at distance)
  •     Line 5 Moctezuma station (at distance)
  •   Routes: 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H (all at distance)
  • 07 San Lázaro    0.7 5.4
  •     Line B
  •   San Lázaro
  •     Line 4: San Lázaro station
  •     Line 5: San Lázaro station
  •   East Bus Terminal (TAPO)
  • 08 Candelaria 1.1 6.4
  •     Line 4
  •     Line 4: Cecilio Robelo station (at distance)
  •   Route: 37
  •   Route: 5-A
  • 09 Merced    0.9 7.3
  •     Line 4: La Merced station
  •   Route: 5-A
  • 10 Pino Suárez    0.8 8.2
  •     Line 2
  •   Passage Zócalo-Pino Suárez
  •   Nezahualcóyotl (at distance)
  •  
  •     Line 4: Pino Suárez station (south route)
  •   Routes: 2-A, 31-B, 111-A, 145-A
  •   Routes: 17-C, 17-H, 17-I, 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H
  • Cuauhtémoc
    11 Isabel la Católica    0.5 8.7
  •  
  •   Routes: 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H
  • 12 Salto del Agua    0.6 9.3
  •     Line 8
  •  
  •     Line 1: Salto del Agua stop
  •   Routes: 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H
  • 13 Balderas    0.6 9.9
  •  
  •   Route: 34-A
  •     Line 3
  •     Line 3: Balderas station
  •   Route: 34-A
  •   Routes: 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H
  • 14 Cuauhtémoc    0.5 10.5
  •  
  •     Line 3: Cuauhtémoc station
  •   Route: 34-A
  •     Line 2: Cuauhtémoc stop
  •   Routes: 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H
  • 15 Insurgentes    0.9 11.4
  •  
  •     Line 1: Glorieta de los Insurgentes station
  •   Route: 34-A
  •   Routes: 18-C (at distance), 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H
  • 16 Sevilla    0.8 12.2
  •  
  •   Routes: 19, 19-A, 34-A
  •   Routes: 13-D, 18-C, 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H
  • 17 Chapultepec Underground
    two-story trench
    0.6 12.9
  •   Chapultepec
  •  
  •     Line 7: Chapultepec station (at distance)
  •   Routes: 11-A, 13-A, 34-A, 115-A, 200
  •     Line 2: Chapultepec stop
  •     Line 6: Chapultepec stop
  •   Routes: 7-D, 8-A, 8-B, 8-C, 8-D, 13-C, 13-E, 18-C, 18-D, 19-E, 19-F, 19-G, 19-H, 21-A
  • 18 Juanacatlán    April 11, 1970 1.1 14.0
  •  
  •   Routes: 13-A, 115-A
  •   Route: 21-A
  • Miguel Hidalgo
    19 Tacubaya    November 20, 1970 Underground
    multi-story trench
    1.3 15.2
  •     Line 7
  •     Line 9
  •   Tacubaya
  •   (at distance)
  •     Line 2: Tacubaya station
  •   Routes: 110, 110-B, 110-C, 112, 113-B, 115, 118, 119, 200
  •   Routes: 1-B, 9-C, 9-E, 21-A
  • 20 Observatorio    June 10, 1972 Hillside trench 1.4 16.7
  •     Line 12 (under construction)
  •   West Bus Terminal
  •   Observatorio
  •   Toluca–Mexico City commuter rail
    (under construction)
  •   Route: 21-D
  • Álvaro Obregón

    Renamed stationsEdit

    Date Old name New name
    1997 Aeropuerto Boulevard Puerto Aéreo

    RidershipEdit

    The following table shows each of Line 1 stations total and average daily ridership during 2019.[1]

    Transfer station
    Terminal
    †‡ Transfer station and terminal
    Rank Station Total ridership Average daily
    1 Observatorio 26,388,110 72,296
    2 Insurgentes 20,753,676 56,859
    3 Chapultepec 19,388,677 53,120
    4 Merced 18,129,244 49,669
    5 Pantitlán†‡ 17,860,457 48,933
    6 Zaragoza 16,963,497 46,475
    7 Tacubaya 12,369,808 33,890
    8 San Lázaro 11,915,094 32,644
    9 Pino Suárez 11,456,022 31,386
    10 Sevilla 11,123,527 30,475
    11 Gómez Farías 10,360,851 28,386
    12 Candelaria 8,554,561 23,437
    13 Boulevard Puerto Aéreo 8,429,972 23,096
    14 Cuauhtémoc 8,311,511 22,771
    15 Isabel la Católica 8,262,282 22,636
    16 Moctezuma 8,050,035 22,055
    17 Balderas 7,825,656 21,440
    18 Salto del Agua 7,482,564 20,500
    19 Balbuena 4,902,639 13,432
    20 Juanacatlán 4,259,229 11,669
    Total 242,787,412 665,171

    TourismEdit

    Line 1 passes near several places of interest:

    See alsoEdit

    NotesEdit

    1. ^ The following list was adapted from different websites and official maps.
      • Metro ( ) connections obtained from the official Mexico City Metro system map.[7]
      • Accessibility obtained from the Mexico City Metro system map. In some cases, the map omits the accessibility icon as the station(s) are actually partially accessible. However, the respective websites of each station on the official site indicate the respective accessibility methods. Stations with the symbol  ‡ are fully accessible; stations with the symbol  † are partially accessible.[7]
      • Centro de transferencia modal (CETRAM;  ) obtained from the official website of the Órgano Regulador de Transporte.[8]
      • Ecobici ( ) obtained from their official website.[9]
      • Metrobús ( ) obtained from the Mexico City Metrobús system map.[10]
      • Mexibús ( ) obtained from the official Mexico City Metro system map.[7]
      • Public buses network (peseros) ( ) obtained from the official website of the Órgano Regulador de Transporte.[11]
      • Red de Transporte de Pasajeros ( ) obtained from their official website.[12]
      • Trolleybuses ( ) obtained from their official website.[13]

    ReferencesEdit

    1. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2019" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 25 April 2020.
    2. ^ a b "Ampliarán Línea 12 del Metro del DF". Sipse (in Spanish). February 14, 2013. Retrieved July 27, 2018.
    3. ^ "Línea 1 del Metro renueva el transporte capitalino". El Universal (in Spanish). September 4, 2016. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
    4. ^ "El origen del Metro del DDF". siempre.mx (in Spanish). Revista Siempre. 4 September 2018. Retrieved 4 April 2020.
    5. ^ "Advierten sobre riesgo de incendio en Línea 1 del Metro". El Universal (in Spanish). 20 August 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
    6. ^ http://www.metro.cdmx.gob.mx/operacion/parque-vehicular Parque vehicular (Rolling stock)
    7. ^ a b c "Mi Mapa Metro 22032021" [My Metro Map 22032021] (PDF) (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 22 March 2021. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    8. ^ "Centros de Transferencia Modal (CETRAM)" [Modal Transfer Centers] (in Spanish). Órgano Regulador de Transporte. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    9. ^ "Mapa de disponibilidad" [Disponibility map] (in Spanish). Ecobici. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    10. ^ "Mapa del sistema" [System map] (in Spanish). Mexico City Metrobús. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    11. ^ "Red de corredores" [Route network] (in Spanish). Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    12. ^ "Red de Rutas" [Routes network] (in Spanish). Red de Transporte de Pasajeros. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
    13. ^ "Servicios" [Services] (in Spanish). Servicio de Transportes Eléctricos. Retrieved 30 October 2021.