Pantitlán metro station

Pantitlán (Spanish: [pantiˈtlan] (listen); Nahuatl transl. "Between flags") is a Mexico City Metro transfer station in the boroughs of Iztacalco and Venustiano Carranza, in Mexico City. It is a combined underground, at-grade, and elevated station with six island platforms and two side platforms, served by Lines 1 (the Pink Line), 5 (the Yellow Line), 9 (the Brown Line), and A (the Purple Line). The only quadra-line interchange station in the system, Pantitlán station works as the terminal station of all of the lines and is located adjacent to Zaragoza (Line 1), Hangares (Line 5), Puebla (Line 9), and Agrícola Oriental (Line A). It serves the colonias (neighborhoods) of Ampliación Adolfo López Mateos, Aviación Civil, and Pantitlán; it receives its name from the last one. The station's pictogram features the silhouettes of two flagpoles.

Pictogram of Pantitlán metro station. It features the silhouettes of two flagpoles. Pantitlán
Mexico City Metro
STC rapid transit
Picture of people wating and leaving at the two island platforms.
Line 5 platforms, 2007
General information
LocationMiguel Lebrija Avenue and Río Churubusco Avenue
Iztacalco and Venustiano Carranza, Mexico City
Mexico
Coordinates19°24′55″N 99°04′20″W / 19.415359°N 99.072132°W / 19.415359; -99.072132Coordinates: 19°24′55″N 99°04′20″W / 19.415359°N 99.072132°W / 19.415359; -99.072132
Operated bySistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Line(s)Mexico City Metro Line 1 (ObservatorioPantitlán)
Mexico City Metro Line 5 (PolitécnicoPantitlán)
Mexico City Metro Line 9 (TacubayaPantitlán)
Mexico City Metro Line A (PantitlánLa Paz)
Platforms
Tracks11
Connections
Construction
Structure type
Bicycle facilitiesBicycle parking-only
Disabled accessYes
Other information
StatusMexico City Metro Line 1 Out of service
Mexico City Metro Line 5Mexico City Metro Line 9Mexico City Metro Line A In service
History
Opened
  • Mexico City Metro Line 1 22 August 1984
  • Mexico City Metro Line 5 19 December 1981
  • Mexico City Metro Line 9 26 August 1987
  • Mexico City Metro Line A 12 August 1991
Key dates
11 July 2022 (2022-07-11)Mexico City Metro Line 1 Temporarily closed
Passengers
2021Total: 89,167,124
Mexico City Metro Line 1 12,091,630[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 5 21,339,443[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 9 22,367,944[1]
Mexico City Metro Line A 33,368,107[1]Increase 2.07%
Rank
Services
Preceding station Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Following station
Zaragoza Line 1 Terminus
Hangares Line 5
Puebla
toward Tacubaya
Line 9
Terminus Line A Agrícola Oriental
toward La Paz
Location
Pantitlán is located in Mexico City
Pantitlán
Pictogram of Pantitlán metro station. It features the silhouettes of two flagpoles. Pantitlán
Location within Mexico City
Area map

Pantitlán station opened on 19 December 1981 with service northwestward toward Consulado on Line 5; service eastward toward Observatorio on Line 1 started on 22 August 1984; service eastward toward Centro Médico on Line 9 started on 26 August 1987; and service southeastward toward La Paz on Line A started on 12 August 1991. The facilities are accessible to the disabled. Inside there is a cultural display, an Internet café, a women's defense module, a public ministry office, a health module, a mural, and a bicycle parking station.

By far, Pantitlán is the busiest station in the system. In 2019, the station had a ridership of 132,845,471 passengers, whereas the second place (Cuatro Caminos) registered 39,378,128 passengers. Out of those, 45,550,938 entrances were registered on Line A, making it the busiest station when counted separately. Starting 11 July 2022, the Line 1 station will remain closed for at least eight months for modernization work on the tunnel and the line's technical equipment.[2]

LocationEdit

 
Line 9's station is found next to Río Churubusco Avenue (pictured)

Pantitlán is a metro transfer station in the boroughs of Iztacalco and Venustiano Carranza, in eastern Mexico City. The station lies mostly along Río Churubusco Avenue and serves colonias (Mexican Spanish for "neighborhoods") of Ampliación Adolfo López Mateos, Aviación Civil, and Pantitlán. Pantitlán station functions as the terminal station of Lines 1, 5, 9, and A, and it is adjacent to Zaragoza (Line 1), Hangares (Line 5), Puebla (Line 9), and Agrícola Oriental (Line A) stations.[3]

The area is serviced by stations of the Metrobús (Line 4), Mexibús (Line III) and trolleybus (Line 2) systems[4][5] Additional service is provided by Routes 11-B, 11-C, 19-F, and 19-G of the city's public bus system[6] and by Route 168 of the Red de Transporte de Pasajeros network.[7] The station is served by a Centro de transferencia modal (CETRAM), a type of transport hub.[8] As of 2010, over 3,600 transport units, locally known as peseros, were operating in the hub.[9] By 2016, the system estimated that the CETRAM was the most used in the country.[10] Pantitlán is also the closest metro station to the Terminal 2 of the Mexico City International Airport.[11]

ExitsEdit

There are eight exits:[3]

  • West: Miguel Lebrija Avenue and Alberto Braniff Street, Aviación Civil, Venustiano Carranza (Line 1).
  • North: Alberto Braniff Street, Aviación Civil, Venustiano Carranza (Line 5).
  • South: Miguel Lebrija Avenue, Aviación Civil, Venustiano Carranza (Line 5).
  • West: Río Churubusco Avenue, Ampliación Adolfo López Mateos, Venustiano Carranza (Line 9).
  • East: Miguel Lebrija Avenue and 2ª Cerrada de Río Churubusco, Pantitlán, Iztacalco (Line 9).
  • North: Río Churubusco Avenue and Talleres Gráficos Street, Ampliación Adolfo López Mateos, Venustiano Carranza (Line A).
  • Northwest: Río Churubusco Avenue and Guadalupe Victoria Street, Ampliación Adolfo López Mateos, Venustiano Carranza (Line A).
  • South: Río Churubusco Avenue, Pantitlán, Iztacalco (Line A).

History and constructionEdit

 
Station layout

The architects were Aurelio Nuño Morales and Isaac Broid.[12] Originally, Line 8 (which runs from downtown Mexico City to Constitución de 1917 station in Iztapalapa) was planned to run from Pantitlán to Indios Verdes station, in Gustavo A. Madero, northern Mexico City. The project was canceled due to potential structural issues it would have caused near the Zócalo zone as it was planned to interchange with Line 2 at Zócalo station.[13]

The station was named after Colonia Pantitlán, whose name means "between flags" in Nahuatl. During the Aztec era, the zone, formerly part of Lake Texcoco, was marked with flagpoles to announce to canoeists that it was dangerous to navigate there due to harsh currents.[3] The station's pictogram features a silhouette of two flagpoles with blank flags.[3] Pantitlán station has an accessible service with elevators (Lines 1 and A), access ramps, escalators (Line 9) and tactile pavings and braille signage plates (Lines 9 and A).[3]

Line 1Edit

The line was built by Ingeniería de Sistemas de Transportes Metropolitano, Electrometro, and Cometro, the last one a subsidiary of Empresas ICA.[14] The Line 1 station opened on 22 August 1984, operating towards Observatorio and connecting Lines 1 and 5.[15] Before it was opened, Zaragoza served as the terminal of Line 1, thus the workshops are found between both stations.[16][17] The location of the workshop indirectly benefited the operations on the line as it allows the trains to depart every 90 seconds.[14] It is an underground station[18] whose interstation tunnel to Zaragoza measures 1,320 meters (4,330 ft).[19] The passenger transfer tunnel that connects Line 1 with Line A has an approximate length of 600 m (2,000 ft), and is the third-longest in the system after those of Atlalilco and La Raza stations.[20]

In 2016, the station received renovation works.[21] The station will be closed in 2022 for modernization work on the tunnel and technical equipment of the line.[22]

Line 5Edit

The line was built by Cometro[23] and its first section was opened on 19 December 1981, operating toward Consulado station.[24] It is an at-grade station whose interstation with Hangares goes from the street level to the underground one;[25] the section is 1,644 meters (5,394 ft) long.[19]

Line 9Edit

The line was built by Cometro[26] and its first section was opened on 26 August 1987, operating toward Centro Médico station.[27] It is an elevated station[26] whose interstation with Puebla measures 1,380 meters (4,530 ft).[19] Additionally, there is a train shed after the station.[26] During the station's construction, a tusk and a molar of a mammoth were found at a depth of 13.5 meters (44 ft).[28]

Line AEdit

The line was built by Empresas ICA[29] and it was opened on 12 August 1991, operating towards La Paz station, located in the municipality of the same name of the State of Mexico.[30] Unlike the other 11 lines, Line A is described as a light metro system[29][31] whose first interstation with Agrícola Oriental is 1,409 meters (4,623 ft) long.[19] It is the line's only underground station as the trains pass below the Line 5 tracks.[29] As it incorporates Calzada Ignacio Zaragoza Avenue, the line emerges to the street level.[25]

To build the station, ICA constructed a false rectangular-shaped tunnel using the Milan method. They added floor slabs and the ceiling is made up of prefabricated slabs. Above the ceiling, they added pavement wherever it was required.[29]

From its opening until 12 December 2013, users coming from Line A had to make a double payment to access the other lines and vice versa.[32]

LandmarksEdit

 
Alegoría a la Ciudad de México y el Sistema de Transporte Colectivo at Line 5's lobby

Inside the station, there is a cultural display, an Internet café, a women's defense module, and a health module.[3] Outside the station, a public ministry office was installed in 2002 to reduce criminal offenses inside the station.[33] On 1 May 2007, the system inaugurated the mural Alegoría a la Ciudad de México y el Sistema de Transporte Colectivo (lit. transl. Allegory to Mexico City and the Collective Transport System), painted by José Luis Elías Jáuregui. According to him, he was inspired by the history of the country and decided to include multiple elements that represent it, including the Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl volcanoes, an eagle devouring a snake (a reference to the country's coat of arms), a pyramid, and a Mestiza holding a white dove. The acrylic-on-canvas artwork is 9 m (30 ft) wide and it honors the STC workers and it features four train models used by the system.[34][35] In 2014, the Government of Mexico City built a bicycle parking station near the CETRAM.[36]

IncidentsEdit

Sinking reports exists since at least 1998.[37] By 2016, the system informed about the existence of cracks and subsidence that would take about five years to be resolved.[38] After the collapse of the elevated railway near Olivos station on Line 12 in May 2021, users reported the structural damage to other elevated stations, including Pantitlán station.[39][40] Mayor of Mexico City, Claudia Sheinbaum, said that the reports would be examined accordingly.[41]

From 1 to 16 March 2020, Pantitlán, Hangares and Terminal Aérea stations on Line 5 were closed due to a leak of gasoline in a surface petrol station.[42] The Line 9 station was closed from 27 March to 7 April 2021 due to repairs on the section between Velódromo and Ciudad Deportiva.[43][44] Platforms M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, and T at the CETRAM were closed on 11 October 2021 due to structural failures detected in the station's basement, which is used to house out-of-service trains.[45]

On 26 January 2022, a man threatened to jump from one of the station's line-connecting bridges. A policeman rappeled down and caught him, but the weight of both broke the rope and both fell approximately 8 meters (26 ft). The fall caused the officer to suffer severe head trauma, while the other man resulted unhurt.[46][47]

RidershipEdit

 
Users accessing on Line A during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic

According to the data provided by the authorities, all the stations have been among the busiest stations of the system's 195 stations. In 2019, before the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public transport, the station's ridership totaled 132,845,471 passengers (363,960 passengers per day), whereas the second place (Cuatro Caminos) registered 39,378,128 passengers.[48]

For Line 1, the ridership was 17,860,457 passengers (48,932 per day), which was an increase of 1,874,257 passengers compared to 2018. For Line 5, the station had a ridership of 36,594,748 passengers (100,259 per day), which was a decrease of 716,435 passengers compared to the previous year. For Line 9, the ridership was 32,839,328 passengers (89,970 per day), which was an increase of 1,060,592 passengers compared to 2018. For Line A, the station had a ridership of 45,550,938 passengers (124,797 per day), which was an increase of 4,700,613 passengers compared to the previous year.[48][49]

In 2019, when counted separately, the Line 1 station was the 17th busiest of the system and the line's 5th busiest. The Line 5 station was the 4th busiest in the system and the line's most used. The Line 9 station was the 5th busiest in the system and it was also the line's busiest. And the Line A station was the busiest in the network, a feat that has occurred since 2017.[48]

As of 2010, around 789,000 commuters transited through the station daily.[9] In the same year, it was estimated that 65 percent of the users came from the State of Mexico.[50] By 2019, user traffic was approaching 100,000 passengers per hour (between 6 and 10 a.m.).[51] In 2019, the system announced measures to distribute passengers to reduce accidents and that there are plans to conclude the construction of a ring connecting the four stations.[52]

Annual passenger ridership (Line 1)
Year Ridership Average daily Rank % change Ref.
2021 12,091,630 33,127 10/195 −11.44% [1]
2020 13,653,217 37,303 8/195 −23.56% [53]
2019 17,860,457 48,932 17/195 +11.72% [48]
2018 15,986,200 43,797 20/195 +3.40% [49]
2017 15,461,001 42,358 19/195 −10.01% [54]
2016 17,181,357 46,943 18/195 −0.80% [55]
2015 17,320,324 47,452 18/195 +0.97% [56]
2014 17,153,569 46,996 18/195 −5.04% [57]
2013 18,063,657 49,489 18/195 −5.27% [58]
2012 19,068,362 52,099 15/195 +18.61% [59]
2011 16,077,171 44,047 17/175 [60]
Annual passenger ridership (Line 5)
Year Ridership Average daily Rank % change Ref.
2021 21,339,443 58,464 4/195 +3.74% [1]
2020 20,569,875 56,201 5/195 −43.79% [53]
2019 36,594,748 100,259 4/195 −1.92% [48]
2018 37,311,183 102,222 4/195 +5.69% [49]
2017 35,302,744 96,719 4/195 −1.57% [54]
2016 35,866,955 97,997 4/195 +2.60% [55]
2015 34,958,155 95,775 6/195 +1.74% [56]
2014 34,359,591 94,135 5/195 +1.47% [57]
2013 33,863,243 92,776 4/195 +40.55% [58]
2012 24,093,004 65,827 9/195 +21.92% [59]
2011 19,760,978 54,139 10/175 [60]
Annual passenger ridership (Line 9)
Year Ridership Average daily Rank % change Ref.
2021 22,367,944 61,282 3/195 +3.97% [1]
2020 21,514,054 58,781 4/195 −34.49% [53]
2019 32,839,328 89,970 5/195 +3.34% [48]
2018 31,778,736 87,065 6/195 +2.96% [49]
2017 30,864,327 84,559 5/195 −7.26% [54]
2016 33,279,237 90,926 5/195 −4.97% [55]
2015 35,019,450 95,943 5/195 −0.97% [56]
2014 35,361,877 96,881 4/195 −7.05% [57]
2013 38,042,808 104,226 3/195 +68.72% [58]
2012 22,547,428 61,604 11/195 +35.61% [59]
2011 16,626,950 45,553 15/175 [60]
Annual passenger ridership (Line A)
Year Ridership Average daily Rank % change Ref.
2021 33,368,107 91,419 1/195 +5.52% [1]
2020 31,623,280 86,402 1/195 −30.58% [53]
2019 45,550,938 124,797 1/195 +11.51% [48]
2018 40,850,325 111,918 1/195 −0.04% [49]
2017 40,865,184 111,959 1/195 −3.69% [54]
2016 42,431,334 115,932 2/195 +0.74% [55]
2015 42,117,957 115,391 2/195 +18.18% [56]
2014 35,637,785 97,637 3/195 +12.82% [57]
2013 31,586,983 86,539 5/195 +0.37% [58]
2012 31,469,750 85,982 4/195 +19.63% [59]
2011 26,306,299 72,072 5/175 [60]

ReferencesEdit

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