Chabacano metro station

Chabacano (Spanish: [tʃa.βa'ka.no] (listen); Mexican Spanish transl. "Apricot") is a Mexico City Metro transfer station in the Cuauhtémoc borough of Mexico City. It is served by Lines 2 (the Blue Line), 8 (the Green Line) and 9 (the Brown Line). It is a combined underground and at-grade station whose platforms are distributed into two side platforms and one island platform—the Spanish solution layout.

Pictogram of Chabacano metro station. It features the silhouette of an apricot. Chabacano
Mexico City Metro
STC rapid transit
Picture of people waiting on the station's platforms.
Line 2 platforms, 2005
General information
LocationCalzada de Tlalpan
Cuauhtémoc, Mexico City
Mexico
Coordinates19°24′33″N 99°08′08″W / 19.40917°N 99.13556°W / 19.40917; -99.13556Coordinates: 19°24′33″N 99°08′08″W / 19.40917°N 99.13556°W / 19.40917; -99.13556
Operated bySistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Line(s)Mexico City Metro Line 2 (Cuatro CaminosTasqueña)
Mexico City Metro Line 8 (Garibaldi / LagunillaConstitución de 1917)
Mexico City Metro Line 9 (TacubayaPantitlán)
Platforms2 side platforms; 1 island platform each (9 platforms in total)
Tracks6
Connections
  • Movilidad Integrada (logo) Red de Transporte de Pasajeros.svg Routes: 2-A, 31-B, 33, 111-A, 145-A
  • Movilidad Integrada (logo) Red de Autobuses de la CDMX.svg Routes: 9-C, 9-E, 14-A, 17-C, 17-H, 17-I
Construction
Structure typeMexico City Metro Line 2 At grade
Mexico City Metro Line 8 Underground
Mexico City Metro Line 9 Underground
Disabled accessYes
Other information
StatusIn service
History
OpenedMexico City Metro Line 2 1 August 1970
Mexico City Metro Line 8 20 July 1994
Mexico City Metro Line 9 26 August 1987
RebuiltMexico City Metro Line 2 1987
Passengers
2021Total: 8,298,834
Mexico City Metro Line 2 4,497,267[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 8 988,177[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 9 2,813,390[1]Decrease 14.55%
RankMexico City Metro Line 2 61/195[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 8 177/195[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 9 117/195[1]
Services
Preceding station Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Following station
San Antonio Abad Line 2 Viaducto
toward Tasqueña
Obrera Line 8 La Viga
Lázaro Cárdenas
toward Tacubaya
Line 9 Jamaica
toward Pantitlán
Location
Chabacano is located in Mexico City
Chabacano
Pictogram of Chabacano metro station. It features the silhouette of an apricot. Chabacano
Location within Mexico City
Area map

Chabacano station is located between San Antonio Abad and Viaducto stations on Line 2, between Obrera and La Viga stations on Line 8, and between Lázaro Cárdenas and Jamaica stations on Line 9. It serves the colonias (neighborhoods) of Ampliación Asturias, Obrera, and Vista Alegre. The station's pictogram depicts an apricot and it was named after a previously existing street that had multiple apricot trees.

Chabacano station opened on 1 August 1970 with service on Line 2 northward toward Pino Suárez station and southward toward Tasqueña station. Southeasterly service on Line 8 toward Constitución de 1917 station and northward toward Garibaldi station began on 20 July 1994. Line 9's west–east service from Centro Médico to Pantitlán started on 26 August 1987. The station serving Line 2 had to be rebuilt when the transfer stations were built.

The station facilities are accessible for people with disabilities as there are elevators and access ramps; inside, there is an Internet café, an information desk, a cultural showcase, a private library, and a mural titled Civilización y Cultura by José de Guimarães. The station also served as a film location for the 1990 film Total Recall, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Javier Álvarez named a composition after the station. In 2019, the station had an overall average daily entrance of 43,617 passengers.

LocationEdit

 
Line 2 station in 2008 along Calzada de Tlalpan

Chabacano is a metro transfer station in the Cuauhtémoc borough, in central Mexico City. The Line 2 station lies along Calzada de Tlalpan, the Line 8 station lies below Juan A. Mateos Street, near Calzada de Tlalpan, and the Line 9 station lies below Eje 3 Sur, José Peón Contreras Avenue. Chabacano station serves the colonias (Mexican Spanish for "neighborhoods") of Ampliación Asturias, Obrera, and Vista Alegre. Within the system, it lies between San Antonio Abad and Viaducto stations on Line 2, between Obrera and La Viga stations on Line 8, and between Lázaro Cárdenas and Jamaica stations on Line 9.[2]

Chabacano is serviced by Routes 2-A, 31-B, 33, 111-A, and 145-A of the Red de Transporte de Pasajeros (RTP) system and by Routes 9-C, 9-E, 14-A, 17-C, 17-H, and 17-I of the public bus system.[3][4]

ExitsEdit

There are nine exits:[2]

  • East: Between Juan A. Mateos Street, Calzada Chabacano and San Antonio Abad Avenue, Vista Alegre (Line 2).
  • West: Between Manuel Caballero Street, Antonio Solís Street and San Antonio Abad Avenue, Obrera (Line 2).
  • North: Juan A. Mateos Street and Vicente Beristain Street, Vista Alegre (Line 8).
  • Southeast: Juan A. Mateos Street and Vicente Beristain Street, Vista Alegre (Line 8).
  • Southwest: Juan A. Mateos Street and Vicente Beristain Street, Vista Alegre (Line 8).
  • Northeast: Calzada Chabacano and J. Antonio Torres X Street, Vista Alegre (Line 9).
  • Southeast: Calzada Chabacano and J. Antonio Torres X Street, Vista Alegre (Line 9).
  • Northwest: Calzada Chabacano and Francisco Ayala Street, Ampliación Asturias (Line 9).
  • Southwest: Calzada Chabacano and Francisco Ayala Street, Ampliación Asturias (Line 9).

History and constructionEdit

 
Chabacano Line 9 and its transfer bridge connecting Line 2.

Line 2 of the Mexico City Metro was built by Ingeniería de Sistemas de Transportes Metropolitano, Electrometro and Cometro, the latter a subsidiary of Empresas ICA.[5] Chabacano Line 2 opened on 1 August 1970, on the first day of the Pino SuárezTasqueña service.[6] The station was built at-grade level[5] with a station design similar to those of the other stations in the at-grade section, including an island platform.[7] The Chabacano–San Antonio Abad section is 642 meters (2,106 ft) long, while the Chabacano–Viaducto stretch measures 774 meters (2,539 ft).[8] When the construction of Lines 8 and 9 began, it was decided to rebuild the station to facilitate passenger boarding and deboarding. It was decided to use the system known as the Spanish solution on all its platforms, in which incoming passengers leave the train through the central platform, then commuters waiting in the station board on the opposite side of the train on the side platforms.[7]

Line 8 was built by ICA[9] and its first and only section opened on 20 July 1994, operating from Garibaldi to Constitución de 1917 stations.[10] Chabacano Line 8 is an underground station; the Chabacano–Obrera tunnel is 1,143 meters (3,750 ft) long, while the Chabacano–La Viga section measures 843 meters (2,766 ft).[8] Line 9 was built by Cometro[11] and its first section was opened on 26 August 1987, operating from Centro Médico towards Pantitlán station.[12] It is an underground station[13] whose interstation with Lázaro Cárdenas measures 1,000 meters (3,300 ft) and the opposite tunnel is 1,031 meters (3,383 ft) long.[8] Unlike other transfer stations in the system with an underground-street-level configuration, where a tunnel usually connects them, the transfer passageway for Lines 2 and 9 is elevated because there was no space to make a tunnel between both stations. The bridge crosses several houses and streets and is 200 meters (660 ft) long. Commuters that use Line 8 need to use two additional sets of stairs that connect to a tunnel that runs between Francisco Ayala Street and Vicente Beristain Street.[14]

Chabacano station has a disabled-accessible service with elevators on Lines 2 and 9 as well as access ramps and escalators on Line 9[2] – these were renovated in 2021 due to their obsolescence.[15] The station's pictogram features the silhouette of an apricot in reference to its name, which references a previously existing street that had multiple apricot trees.[2] The use of the word chabacano to refer to the fruit is limited to Mexican Spanish; elsewhere, the word means "tacky" and "vulgar".[16]

Landmarks, cultural events and popular cultureEdit

 
Part of the mural Cultura y Civilización

Due to the size of Chabacano station, the system allows the exhibition of cultural programs in its lobby. The station has hosted mini-concerts featuring musicians such as Trans-X, Ji-Hae Park or the Orquesta Sinfónica de Yucatán.[17][18][19] Inside the station, there is an Internet café, an information desk, a cultural showcase,[2] a private library,[20] and a mural titled Civilización y Cultura (English: "Culture and Civilization") by Portuguese artist José de Guimarães. The mural was created on a ceramic surface of 120 square meters (1,300 sq ft) and is divided into two parts. It is located on Line 9 and was inaugurated on 6 November 1996. The mural features elements of the pre-Hispanic cultures of Mesoamerica. According to de Guimarães "two fundamental archetypes have prevailed throughout the centuries [in pre-Hispanic Mexican culture]: the serpent as a symbol of water-life and the jaguar as a symbol of earth-fertility. Without these two important elements for man, history would not take place".[21]

Javier Álvarez, a Mexican composer, named one of his compositions after the metro station. Álvarez first created "Canción de tierra y esperanza" (English: "Song of Earth and Hope"), which he dedicated to his parents for Christmas 1986. In 1990, the metro system allowed Marco Límenes, a Mexican artist, to exhibit his kinetic sculptures in the station. Límenes asked Álvarez to use the composition during the exhibition. Álvarez, instead, recomposed the work and renamed it "Metro Chabacano". He requested the Cuarteto Latinoamericano to play and record it. The composition is a string quartet that has an average tempo of 144 to 146 beats per minute. According to Álvarez, it has "a continuous eight-note movement of moderately driving speed from which short melodic solos emerge for each instrument [...] although the piece is brief and in single movement, the rhythms, accents and melodic fragments that emerge from the perpetual motion background are intricately playful".[22] Jacques Sagot wrote for La Nación that the composition converges with the pace of the station, at first with an "uninterrupted flow of repeated notes" and then with "whistles of the violin [evoking] the braking of the machine, the squeaking of the rubber [with] the arrival of the metro train".[23] The Cuarteto Latinoamericano played the composition live at the inauguration of the exhibition in September 1991 and Álvarez subsequently adopted it as a string orchestra composition.[24]

 
Transfer lobby at Line 9

Scenes from the 1990 film Total Recall were shot at night on location at the station. The film stars Arnold Schwarzenegger and is set in 2084, a time in which humankind has colonized Mars. In one of his scenes on Earth, Douglas Quaid, a secret agent whose memory has been erased, flees from people trying to kill him. Quaid enters a subway station and manages to escape by jumping through the window of an outbound train. Schwarzenegger cut his wrist during the scene because the film crew did not explode the window in time.[25] The crew painted the station walls and a train in cement gray, covered the signage and added monitors in different areas.[26][27]

By 2020, the station and surrounding area became a popular location for the purchase and sale of used and vintage clothing, particularly on weekends.[28]

IncidentsEdit

On 28 December 2010, an elderly passenger who tried to help two others who had dropped items onto the tracks fell onto the tracks himself and was killed by an approaching train on Line 2.[29] On 4 June 2018, a law student was arrested for attempting to make use of the library Benito Juárez located inside the station. The manager denied him access and informed him that its use was limited to metro system personnel. When he was referred to the public prosecutor's office, they refused to charge him as they considered it unjustified to prohibit him from using the facilities in accordance with the City Libraries Code since it was located in a public space. System authorities informed that the library is open to the general public upon registration.[20][30]

The station was vandalized on 12 September 2020 by feminists for reported cases of harassment and for not being allowed to hawk inside the system stations.[31] After the collapse of a bridge on Line 12, where 26 people died, feminists again vandalized the station and assaulted the Metro staff, who they held responsible for the event.[32] On 1 April 2022, a woman slipped off an escalator and knocked down seven others, all reported with minor injuries.[33]

RidershipEdit

According to the data provided by the authorities, accesses on Line 2 are more frequent than on Lines 8 and 9, which are among the least used stations of the system. In 2019, before the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public transport, the station's ridership totaled 15,920,404 passengers,[34] which was an increase of 496,341 passengers compared to 2018.[35]

In 2019, for Line 2, the ridership was 10,452,786 passengers (28,637 per day), which was a decrease of 378,369 passengers compared to 2018. For Line 8, the station had a ridership of 1,554,977 passengers (4,260 per day), which was a decrease of 16,068 passengers compared to the previous year. For Line 9, the ridership was 3,912,641 passengers (10,719 per day), which was a decrease of 101,904 passengers compared to 2018.[34][35] By December 2021, system officials estimated that 83,000 users transited on average through the station.[36]

In the same year, when counted separately, the Line 2 station was the 47th busiest of the system (out of 195 stations) and the line's 9th busiest. The Line 8 station was the 191st busiest in the system and the line's least used. The Line 9 station was the 150th busiest in the system and it was also the line's third-least used.[34]

Annual passenger ridership (Line 2)
Year Ridership Average daily Rank % change Ref.
2021 4,497,267 12,321 61/195 −32.96% [1]
2020 6,707,998 18,327 34/195 −35.83% [37]
2019 10,452,786 28,637 47/195 −3.49% [34]
2018 10,831,155 29,674 45/195 +5.52% [35]
2017 10,264,980 28,123 47/195 −0.07% [38]
2016 10,272,203 28,066 49/195 +0.34% [39]
2015 10,236,980 28,046 50/195 +3.69% [40]
2014 9,872,380 27,047 52/195 +2.73% [41]
2013 9,609,998 26,328 57/195 −15.92% [42]
2012 11,429,221 31,227 39/195 +1.38% [43]
2011 11,273,574 30,886 48/175 [44]
Annual passenger ridership (Line 8)
Year Ridership Average daily Rank % change Ref.
2021 988,177 2,707 177/195 +11.73% [1]
2020 884,432 2,416 189/195 −43.12% [37]
2019 1,554,977 4,260 191/195 −1.02% [34]
2018 1,571,045 4,304 191/195 +10.33% [35]
2017 1,424,001 3,901 191/195 +2.15% [38]
2016 1,394,042 3,808 191/195 +0.44% [39]
2015 1,387,923 3,802 183/195 −0.51% [40]
2014 1,395,094 3,822 183/195 +1.04% [41]
2013 1,380,675 3,782 192/195 −31.36% [42]
2012 2,011,380 5,495 169/195 +40.03% [43]
2011 1,436,440 3,935 173/175 [44]
Annual passenger ridership (Line 9)
Year Ridership Average daily Rank % change Ref.
2021 2,813,390 7,707 117/195 +32.75% [1]
2020 2,119,283 5,790 150/195 −45.83% [37]
2019 3,912,641 10,719 150/195 −2.54% [34]
2018 4,014,545 10,998 146/195 +0.42% [35]
2017 3,997,946 10,953 143/195 −0.01% [38]
2016 3,998,201 10,924 144/195 +0.59% [39]
2015 3,974,566 10,889 131/195 +6.61% [40]
2014 3,728,213 10,214 137/195 +20.67% [41]
2013 3,089,701 8,464 158/195 −28.46% [42]
2012 4,318,989 11,800 133/195 −9.71% [43]
2011 4,783,262 13,104 131/175 [44]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Afluencia de estación por línea 2021" [Station traffic per line 2021] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2022. Archived from the original on 7 March 2022. Retrieved 7 March 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Chabacano" (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. Archived from the original on 27 March 2022. Retrieved 25 April 2022.
  3. ^ "Red de Rutas" [Routes network] (in Spanish). Red de Transporte de Pasajeros. Archived from the original on 6 November 2021. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
  4. ^ "Red de corredores" [Route network] (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 14 October 2021. Retrieved 30 October 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Línea 2, Ciudad de México" [Line 2, Mexico City] (in Spanish). iNGENET Infraestructura. 20 July 2009. Archived from the original on 18 January 2021. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  6. ^ Escobedo, Alina (31 August 2021). "¿Cuáles son las estaciones de la Línea 2 del Metro de la CDMX?" [Which are the stations of the Mexico City Metro Line 2?]. Noticieros Televisa (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 21 October 2021. Retrieved 25 April 2022.
  7. ^ a b Jiménez González, Noé Fernando (June 1991). "Reconstrucción y ampliación de la Estación Chabacano entronque Línea 2 y 9" [Rebuilt and extension of Chabacano Station, Lines 2 and 9 junction] (in Spanish). Naucalpan: National Autonomous University of Mexico. Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 25 April 2022.
  8. ^ a b c "Longitud de estación a estación por línea" [Station-to-station length per line] (in Spanish). Sistema de Transporte Colectivo Metro. Archived from the original on 4 May 2021. Retrieved 12 July 2021.
  9. ^ "Línea 8, Ciudad de México" [Line 8, Mexico City] (in Spanish). iNGENET Infraestructura. 20 July 2009. Archived from the original on 3 July 2020. Retrieved 12 September 2021.
  10. ^ "Ingeniería y Metro" [Engineering and Metro] (PDF). Sistema de Transporte Colectivo Metro (in Spanish). Colegio de Ingenieros Civiles de México. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 13 September 2021. Retrieved 12 September 2021.
  11. ^ "Línea 9, Ciudad de México" [Line 9, Mexico City] (in Spanish). iNGENET Infraestructura. 20 July 2009. Archived from the original on 2 September 2014. Retrieved 15 April 2020.
  12. ^ Escobedo, Alina (21 September 2021). "¿Cuáles son las estaciones de la Línea 9 del Metro de la CDMX?" [Which are the stations of the Mexico City Metro Line 9?]. Noticieros Televisa (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 23 September 2021. Retrieved 4 October 2021.
  13. ^ Mendoza, Janatna (21 May 2021). "Especialistas concluyen inspección física de tramo elevado en Línea 9 del Metro de CdMx" [Specialists conclude physical inspection of elevated section of Line 9 of the Mexico City Metro system]. Milenio (in Spanish). Mexico City. Archived from the original on 4 May 2022. Retrieved 4 May 2022.
  14. ^ "5 transbordos extremos del Metro" [5 extreme Metro transfers]. Chilango (in Spanish). 27 August 2015. Archived from the original on 6 August 2018. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  15. ^ "Metro estrenará escaleras eléctricas en Tacubaya y Chabacano" [Metro will inaugurate escalators in Tacubaya and Chabacano]. Chilango (in Spanish). 30 June 2021. Archived from the original on 1 July 2021. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  16. ^ Sandoval, Cecilia (1 May 2008). "Estación Chabacano" [Chabacano Station] (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 28 March 2012. Retrieved 29 July 2011.
  17. ^ Anzaldo, Val (2017). "Fuimos a un concierto de High Energy en el Metro de la Ciudad de México" [We went to a High Energy concert in the Mexico City Metro]. Vice (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  18. ^ "Ofrece Ji-Hae Park concierto de gala en el Metro" [Ji-Hae Park offers gala concert in the Metro]. Secretariat of Culture (in Spanish). Government of Mexico. 19 March 2014. Archived from the original on 27 July 2018. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  19. ^ "Enrique Bagaría con la Orquesta Sinfónica de Yucatán" [Enrique Bagaría with the Orquesta Sinfónica de Yucatán]. Secretariat of Culture (in Spanish). Government of Mexico. 2020. Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  20. ^ a b "Detienen a estudiante por querer usar biblioteca del Metro" [Student arrested for trying to use Metro library]. ADN40 (in Spanish). 4 June 2018. Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  21. ^ "Civilización y Cultura" [Culture and Civilization] (in Spanish). Sistema de Transporte Colectivo Metro. Archived from the original on 28 October 2020. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  22. ^ Álvarez, Javier (1992). "Metro Chabacano for String Quartet". Peer International Corporation. p. 2. Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022 – via Issuu.
  23. ^ Sagot, Jacques (29 May 2016). "Metro Chabacano, la poética del tren" [Metro Chabacano, the poetics of the train]. La Nación. Archived from the original on 5 November 2019. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  24. ^ "Álvarez, Javier – Metro Chabacano". Secretariat of Culture of Mexico City (in Spanish). Government of Mexico City. 25 September 2019. Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  25. ^ Polowy, Kevin (1 June 2020). "'Total Recall' at 30: Arnold Schwarzenegger recalls gruesome wrist-cutting injury on set". Yahoo! Entertainment. Archived from the original on 24 April 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  26. ^ Castillo, Jesús (30 July 2021). "¡74 años de edad!, cuando Arnold Schwarzenegger filmó en CDMX" [74 years old! when Arnold Schwarzenegger filmed in CDMX]. MVS Noticias (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  27. ^ Chavarría Espinosa, Adrián (30 March 2015). "Alebrijes en Cuadratines: El Cine y la Ciudad de México" [Alebrijes in Quads: Cinema and Mexico City]. Por la Libre (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  28. ^ "'El Metro dejó de ser seguro para las emprendedoras'" ['Metro is no longer safe for women entrepreneurs']. El Universal (in Spanish). 14 September 2020. Archived from the original on 16 May 2022. Retrieved 30 March 2021.
  29. ^ "Reanudan servicio en Metro Chabacano" [Service in Chabacano metro station restored]. El Universal (in Spanish). 28 December 2010. Archived from the original on 30 September 2011. Retrieved 29 July 2011.
  30. ^ "Joven arrestado por entrar a biblioteca del Metro estudiará becado en Harvard" [Young man arrested for entering Metro library to study at Harvard on scholarship]. Imagen Televisión (in Spanish). Mexico City. 11 June 2018. Archived from the original on 21 June 2018. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  31. ^ Dorantes, Elizabeth (12 September 2020). "Mujeres protestan en Metro Chabacano contra el acoso y piden no criminalizar bazares" [Women protest in Chabacano metro station against harassment and ask not to criminalize bazaars]. El Sol de México (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 10 November 2021. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  32. ^ Vargas, Aabye (7 May 2021). "Agreden a personal del Metro en estación Chabacano por tragedia en L12" [Metro staff assaulted at Chabacano station due to L12 tragedy]. El Sol de México (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 14 June 2021. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  33. ^ Ramírez, Omar (1 April 2022). "Reportan personas lesionadas tras caída en escaleras eléctricas de L2 de Metro Chabacano" [Injured persons reported after fall on escalators of Chabacano metro station L2]. Debate (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 2 April 2022. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  34. ^ a b c d e f "Afluencia de estación por línea 2019" [Station traffic per line 2019] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2020. Archived from the original on 8 April 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
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  36. ^ Mata Othón, Atalo (27 December 2021). "Metro estrena escalera eléctrica en la estación Chabacano" [Metro inaugurates escalator in Chabacano metro station]. Excélsior. Archived from the original on 27 December 2021. Retrieved 15 May 2022 – via YouTube.
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  44. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2011" [Station traffic per line 2011] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2012. Archived from the original on 7 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.

External linksEdit