List of animated series with LGBT characters

This is a list of animated series with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, asexual, genderqueer, and pansexual characters, along with other (LGBTQ) characters. This list includes fictional characters in animated cartoons, adult animation, and anime. This page includes some of those on the list of crossdressing characters in animated series.

These lists only include recurring characters, otherwise known as supporting characters, which appear frequently from time to time during the series' run, often playing major roles in more than one episode, and those in the main cast are listed below. LGBTQ characters which are guest stars or one-off characters are listed on the pages focusing exclusively on gay (in animation and anime), lesbian (in animation and anime), bisexual (in animation and anime), trans, pansexual, asexual, non-binary, and intersex characters.

The entries on this page are organized alphanumerically by duration dates.

1960–1980sEdit

Duration Show title Character debut date Characters Identity Notes Country
1967–1968 Princess Knight April 2, 1967 Princess Sapphire Possibly trans woman or genderqueer[a] Princess Sapphire is raised as a boy by their father since women are not eligible to inherit the throne, who is transgender or genderqueer.[2][1] In addition, they are born with both a male and female heart but refuses to give up their boy heart as they need it to vanquish evil.[1] Nonetheless, they fall in love with and marry Prince Frank. Japan
1979–1980 The Rose of Versailles October 10, 1979 Queen Marie Antoinette Bisexual Marie enters a political marriage with King Louis XVI of France but falls in love with Count von Fersen. She is considered a love interest of Oscar,[3] though their relationship never quite goes beyond master and servant.[4][5]
Rosalie Lamorlière She is the adopted daughter of Nicole Lamorlière,[6] attempting prostitution at one point to get money. She tries to kill Oscar's mother but Oscar stops her and soon takes her as an apprentice, earning Rosalie's admiration and love, as she opens his eyes.[6][7] She later ends up marrying Oscar's friend, Bernard Chatelet in the episode "A Funeral Bell Tolls in the Twilight".
Oscar François de Jarjayes Queer A young queer woman raised as a soldier, dressing and behaving as a man, Oscar is open about being female.[8][9][10] Oscar's love interest is one of the series protagonists, Marie Antoinette.[3][10] She also has a relationship with Andre,[4] a childhood friend, but is only able to share one passionate night with Oscar.
1981–1986 Urusei Yatsura March 16, 1983 Ryuunosuke Fujinami Lesbian or bisexual Ryūnosuke is a tomboyish girl and a protagonist of the anime.[11] In one episode, "Ran-chan's Great Date Plan!", she goes out on a date with an alien girl Ran, who thinks that Ryūnosuke is a lesbian after she says she has no interest in boys, and in another, "The Muco Flower's Name is Ryunosuke", the series villains try to turn her into a boy. In other episodes, like "Shine! The Blessed Bra!!", she is backmailed into going on a date with Shinobu, and becomes good friends with Benten, who acknowledges her femininity without making a joke in episodes such as "Benten & Ryunosuke - Run Toward Tomorrow!" and "Ryunosuke VS Benten! Great Fruitless Amorousness Duel". In the OVA, titled "Nagisa's Fiance", Nagisa Shiowatari becomes her fiancé, a guy who was raised as a girl, meaning he behaves and crossdresses as a girl, implying that she may be bisexual. Her character was later used as a prototype for Ukyo Kuonji in Ranma ½.[12]
1982–1983 Patalliro! April 8, 1982 Jack Barbarosa Bancoran Gay He enjoys flirting with and seducing young boys, having the name of "Young Boy Killer".[13] Women have shown interest in him and he shows no interest, though he did show mild interest in Pataliro's mother Etrange.
1983–1984 Stop!! Hibari-kun! May 20, 1983 Hibari Ōzora Trans woman Assigned male at birth, Hibari looks and behaves as a girl, expresses interest in having breasts, and has become more feminine after Kōsaku starts living at her household.[14][15][b] She has demonstrated romantic interest in Kōsaku and is implied to have zero interest in women.
1983-1986 SuperTed October 4, 1983 Skeleton Gay Skeleton is one of Texas Pete's two henchmen. He is a living skeleton who is cowardly and behaves in a campy and effeminate manner. Skeleton has the ability to put himself back together after falling apart. He was confirmed to be gay in a 2014 interview with series creator Mike Young.[16][17] Wales
1985–1987 Fight! Iczer One October 19, 1985 Cobalt Lesbian Cobalt and Sepia are also depicted as lovers, occasionally kissing in this "classic of early anime."[18][19] Japan
Sepia
Iczer-1 Iczer-1 and Nagisa are displayed as being in a romantic and intimate relationship throughout the series.[20][21]
Nagisa Kanou
1985–1990 Dirty Pair August 26, 1985 Joanca Trans woman In "Love Is Everything, Betting Their Lives On Elopement", Yuri and Kei are sent by a rich business owner to find the son he claims was kidnapped by a terrifying woman. However, it soon becomes apparent that this is all a setup and the rich guy's son, named Clicky Goldjeff, and the woman, Joanna, are actually lovers who want to elope. One of the core reasons why the father hates Joanna is that she was assigned male at birth. The son, naturally, does not care, and Yuri and Kei see this transphobia as incredibly old fashioned, claiming that one in 10 people have transitioned.[22]
1986-1989 Dragon Ball January 14, 1987 General Blue Gay A canon gay character and Nazi,[23] who is series antagonist, having an entire saga focused on him. He also makes an appearance in Dragon Ball GT.
1987–1991 Bubblegum Crisis February 25, 1987 Daley Wong Gay Daley is a sympathetically presented gay character.[24]
1989 Ranma ½ April 15, 1989 Ranma Saotome Ambiguous Ranma, the male protagonist, is a "guy who transforms into a girl...from a woman into a man," and is attracted to Akane Tendo.[25][26] However, it is unclear whether this is confirmation she is a trans man,[27] trans woman[28] or something else because Rumiko Takahashi said in November 1992 that she decided on "the character being half man and half woman."[29][c]
Akane Tendo Possibly bisexual Despite a rocky start to their relationship,[25] Akane is attracted to the anime's protagonist, Ranma, seemingly in both his male and female forms, though her only other romantic interests are male.[30] Also, she is attracted to Ranma in the manga the series was based on.[26]
1989–1990 Alfred J. Kwak December 24, 1989 Ollie de Ooievaar Trans man Ollie is one of the protagonist's close friends. At the start of the series he is referred to with female pronouns, but after a timeskip he starts using male pronouns. This is never directly addressed during the series. In a Dutch interview from 2013 Ollie was confirmed to be a trans man.[31] Netherlands
1989–present The Simpsons December 17, 1989 Patty Bouvier Lesbian Patty officially came out in a 2005 episode, "There's Something About Marrying", which was one of the episodes that carried the occasional warning of content that might be unsuitable for children.[32] Like Dewey and Smithers, she is a recurring gay character. In "Livin La Pura Vida", Patty had a new girlfriend named Evelyn.[33] United States
Dewey Largo Gay Mr. Largo is the school's music teacher, whose last name is also an Italian word for a slow, broad, musical tempo.[34] A recurring gag in episodes such as "See Homer Run", are allusions that Largo is gay. A later episode, "Flaming Moe", confirmed that Largo is gay and in a relationship with an older man, also named Dewey.[35][36]
January 21, 1990 Waylon Smithers Smithers is a semi-closeted gay man.[37][38] Waylon Smithers and Patty Bouvier ride a float called "Stayin' in the Closet!" during Springfield's annual gay pride parade in a 2002 episode, "Jaws Wired Shut". In a 2016 episode, "The Burns Cage", Smithers officially comes out as gay.[39]
November 21, 2001 Brunella Pommelhorst Transgender Mrs. Pommelhorst is the gym teacher who announced his intention to take time off and return as "Mr. Pommelhorst, the shop teacher" in the episode "My Fair Laddy", although she later returned as the same.[36][38]
April 13, 2003 Grady and Julio Gay They are a stereotypical gay couple[36][38] who later break up, with Julio later married to Thad, shown in episodes such as "Three Gays of the Condo". Julio is known in later seasons for being Marge's recurring hairdresser.

1990sEdit

The depiction of LGBTQ characters in animated series in the 1990s changed significantly from those in previous decades. Some of the most prominent series during this decade which features LGBTQ+ characters were Sailor Moon, South Park, King of the Hill, Cardcaptor Sakura and Futurama. However, Revolutionary Girl Utena stood apart, with prominent LGBTQ+ characters, which some called one of the most important anime of the 1990s.[40] It heavily influenced the creator of Steven Universe, Rebecca Sugar, calling a series which "plays with the semiotics of gender" which really stuck with her.[41] Additionally, during this decade, Family Guy and SpongeBob SquarePants premiered, with LGBTQ+ protagonists in both shows.

For further historical context on LGBTQ+ animated characters in the 1990s, please see the History of LGBT characters in animated series: 1990s page.

2000sEdit

The depiction of LGBTQ characters in animated series in the 2000s changed significantly from the previous decade. In 1999, Simpsons and The Critic producer Mike Reiss who hoped to do something "good for the gay audience" produced Queer Duck, the first animated TV series with homosexuality as a predominant theme.[42][43] The show became relatively influential after premiering online on Icebox.com, then later shown on Showtime starting in 2000, and was received well by some in the LGBTQ+ community. While LGBTQ+ characters appeared in shows such as The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, Red vs. Blue, and The Boondocks, the ongoing show, American Dad, which premiered in 2005, had a pansexual character as a protagonist, Roger. While the gay news anchors Greg Corbin and Terry Bates were recurring characters in the show, Roger, a space alien who lives with the Smith family, has an ambiguous sexuality.[44][45][46]

For further historical context on LGBT animated characters in the 2000s, please see the History of LGBT characters in animation: 2000s page.

2010sEdit

The depiction of LGBTQ characters in animated series in the 2010s changed significantly from the previous decade; especially in Western animation.[47] One of the shows cited as being the most influential for this change in representation is Steven Universe, created by Rebecca Sugar and aired on Cartoon Network.[48] As GLAAD put it in their 2019-2020 report, the show continues to "go above and beyond when it comes to inclusive storytelling."[49] The 2010s also brought with it shows such as Adventure Time, The Legend of Korra and She-Ra and the Princesses of Power, all of which had strong LGBTQ+ characters.

For further historical context on LGBT animated characters in the 2010s, please see the History of LGBT characters in animation: 2010s page.

2020sEdit

The depiction of LGBT characters in animated series in the 2020s changed from the 2010s, accelerating like never seen before, especially when it came to Western animation. The Owl House featured some of the first LGBTQ protagonists in a Disney show,[50] while Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts had a prominent gay relationship not previously seen in animation.[51] In adult animation, Magical Girl Friendship Squad and Helluva Boss broke ground, the former with a lesbian protagonist[52] and the latter with two bisexual characters and one pansexual character. However, in 2020, She-Ra and the Princesses of Power and Steven Universe Future, both of which had various LGBTQ characters, ended.[53][54] In anime, LGBTQ characters appeared in various productions, such as Adachi and Shimamura,[55] Assault Lily Bouquet,[56] My Next Life as a Villainess: All Routes Lead to Doom!,[55] Interspecies Reviewers,[57] and Seton Academy: Join the Pack!.[58]

For further historical context on LGBT animated characters in the 2020s, please see the History of LGBT characters in animation: 2020s page.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ According to Erica Friedman.[1]
  2. ^ Haruyuki writes that Hibari-kun is "the idol of boys at school" and is "a beautiful girl who also feels a woman's sex appeal, the "he" and "her" parts are ambiguous to readers...The main character, Hibari-kun, is a girl but actually a boy, and expresses the air of the 80s through pop culture such as celebrities and popular items." He is referring to the manga, mainly, but the same can apply to the anime.
  3. ^ Kappa was an Italian magazine published by Star Comics from July 1992 to November 2006, having 173 issues. Takahashi in the Ranma ½ Memorial Book/The Art of Ranma , talked about how she came up with the idea of Ranma transforming, adding that Ranma could be a male or female name.

ReferencesEdit

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  2. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (September 24, 2012). "Right Stuf Licenses Princess Knight TV Anime". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on February 20, 2019. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
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  46. ^ Where We Are on TV Report: 2007-2008 (PDF) (Report). GLAAD. 2008. p. 3. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2020. There is only one male character on broadcast television counted as bisexual: Roger the Alien on Fox's animated series American Dad!..Another animated Fox program, American Dad!, features an bisexual alien named Roger as a series regular, and gay couple Terry and Greg as recurring characters.
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BibliographyEdit