Kvæfjord

Kvæfjord (Northern Sami: Giehtavuotna) is a municipality in Troms og Finnmark county, Norway. It is part of the traditional region of Central Hålogaland. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Borkenes. Other villages include Hundstad, Langvassbukta, and Revsnes.

Kvæfjord kommune

Giehtavuotna
View of the island of Gapøya
View of the island of Gapøya
Official logo of Kvæfjord kommune
Troms og Finnmark within
Norway
Kvæfjord within Troms og Finnmark
Kvæfjord within Troms og Finnmark
Coordinates: 68°42′07″N 16°08′49″E / 68.70194°N 16.14694°E / 68.70194; 16.14694Coordinates: 68°42′07″N 16°08′49″E / 68.70194°N 16.14694°E / 68.70194; 16.14694
CountryNorway
CountyTroms og Finnmark
DistrictCentral Hålogaland
Established1 Jan 1838
Administrative centreBorkenes
Government
 • Mayor (2011)Torbjørn Larsen (Ap)
Area
 • Total512.61 km2 (197.92 sq mi)
 • Land497.29 km2 (192.00 sq mi)
 • Water15.32 km2 (5.92 sq mi)  3%
Area rank208 in Norway
Population
 (2020)
 • Total2,839
 • Rank237 in Norway
 • Density5.7/km2 (15/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
−6.9%
Demonym(s)Kvæfjerding[1]
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-5411
Official language formNeutral[2]
Websitekvafjord.kommune.no

Together with Harstad, the two municipalities cover a large part of the island of Hinnøya in the southern part of the Troms county. Kvæfjord consists mostly of mountains and fjords. The municipality centers on the Kvæfjorden and Gullesfjorden.

Kvæfjord is also where the Norwegian national cake, Kvæfjord cake, originally comes from.

The 513-square-kilometre (198 sq mi) municipality is the 208th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Kvæfjord is the 237th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 2,839. The municipality's population density is 5.7 inhabitants per square kilometre (15/sq mi) and its population has decreased by 6.9% over the previous 10-year period.[3][4]

General informationEdit

 
Kvæfjord map

Kvæfjord was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). On 25 October 1956, a part of Kvæfjord (population: 32) was transferred to neighboring Trondenes municipality. On 1 January 2000, the part of Kvæfjord that surrounded the Godfjorden (population: 102) was transferred from Kvæfjord to Sortland municipality (in neighboring Nordland county).[5]

On 1 January 2020, the municipality became part of the newly formed Troms og Finnmark county. Previously, it had been part of the old Troms county.[6]

NameEdit

The municipality is named after the fjord (Old Norse: Kviðjufjǫrðr). The first element is the genitive case of the name of the island Kviðja (now Kvæøya) and the last element is fjǫrðr which means "fjord". The name of the island might be derived from the word kviðr which means "belly" or "stomach". Prior to 1889, the name was spelled Kvædfjord.[7]

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms is from modern times; they were granted on 4 April 1986. The green arms show a yellow strawberry plant. The symbolism of the color and the plant is that the main source of income in the municipality is agriculture, and it is also the northernmost village in Norway where strawberries can grow.[8]

ChurchesEdit

The Church of Norway has one parish (sokn) within the municipality of Kvæfjord. It is part of the Trondenes prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland.

Churches in Kvæfjord
Parish (Sokn) Church Name Location of the Church Year Built
Kvæfjord Kvæfjord Church Borkenes 1867
Langvassbukt Chapel Langvassbukta 1981

EconomyEdit

 
Kvæfjord landscape

The municipality is known for agriculture and farming. The quality of the strawberries is famous. The long hours of daylight, combined with relatively low summer temperatures, make the strawberries more tasteful than berries grown in warmer climates.

A large institution for the mentally handicapped was once located in Kvæfjord. It employed a large number of health workers.

GeographyEdit

The municipality is located on Hinnøya island and it is split by three smaller branches of the large Andfjorden: Gullesfjorden, Kvæfjorden, and Godfjorden. The island of Kvæøya is located in the middle of the Kvæfjorden, across from Borkenes.

The landscape of today was largely formed during the last ice age. When the ice retreated, the terrain rose by 50 metres (164 ft). It is in this belt of old seabed that today's best farm land is located. There are four county roads connecting the municipality: two to the north and one each to the east and south. The 412-metre (1,352 ft) tall mountain Nupen is located in the northern part of the municipality on the border with Harstad.

ClimateEdit

Climate data for Borkenes, Kvæfjord
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) −0.5
(31.1)
−0.3
(31.5)
1.6
(34.9)
4.3
(39.7)
9.0
(48.2)
13.3
(55.9)
15.6
(60.1)
15.0
(59.0)
10.8
(51.4)
6.4
(43.5)
2.3
(36.1)
0.4
(32.7)
6.5
(43.7)
Daily mean °C (°F) −2.8
(27.0)
−2.5
(27.5)
−1.0
(30.2)
1.9
(35.4)
6.4
(43.5)
10.2
(50.4)
12.6
(54.7)
12.1
(53.8)
8.3
(46.9)
4.3
(39.7)
0.4
(32.7)
−1.9
(28.6)
4.0
(39.2)
Average low °C (°F) −5.2
(22.6)
−5.0
(23.0)
−3.6
(25.5)
−1.0
(30.2)
3.1
(37.6)
7.2
(45.0)
9.7
(49.5)
9.0
(48.2)
5.6
(42.1)
1.9
(35.4)
−1.9
(28.6)
−4.2
(24.4)
1.3
(34.3)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 81
(3.2)
74
(2.9)
59
(2.3)
47
(1.9)
33
(1.3)
40
(1.6)
51
(2.0)
56
(2.2)
82
(3.2)
109
(4.3)
94
(3.7)
94
(3.7)
820
(32.3)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1 mm) 12.6 12.4 10.6 9.9 7.9 9.2 11.0 11.6 14.3 16.3 13.9 15.0 144.7
Source: Norwegian Meteorological Institute[9]

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Kvæfjord, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elect a mayor.[10] The municipality falls under the Trondenes District Court and the Hålogaland Court of Appeal.

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Kvæfjord is made up of 23 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 2020–2023 [11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre)
and the Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)
5
Total number of members:23
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 2016–2019 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:23
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 2012–2015 [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)4
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:23
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 2008–2011 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)5
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:23
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 2004–2007 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)4
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:23
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 2000–2003 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
 Joint list of the Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)
and the Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)
5
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1996–1999 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1992–1995 [15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1988–1991 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1984–1987 [17]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Conservative Party (Høyre)8
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1980–1983 [18]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Conservative Party (Høyre)7
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1976–1979 [19]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1972–1975 [20]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)8
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1968–1971 [21]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Kommunestyre 1964–1967 [22]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 List of workers, fishermen, and small farmholders
(Arbeidere, fiskere, småbrukere liste)
3
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)1
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Herredsstyre 1960–1963 [23]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 List of workers, fishermen, and small farmholders
(Arbeidere, fiskere, småbrukere liste)
1
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)7
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Herredsstyre 1956–1959 [24]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)9
Total number of members:29
Kvæfjord Herredsstyre 1952–1955 [25]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)7
Total number of members:20
Kvæfjord Herredsstyre 1948–1951 [26]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)2
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)10
Total number of members:20
Kvæfjord Herredsstyre 1945–1947 [27]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)12
Total number of members:20
Kvæfjord Herredsstyre 1938–1941* [28]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
 List of workers, fishermen, and small farmholders
(Arbeidere, fiskere, småbrukere liste)
3
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)1
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)7
Total number of members:20

Notable peopleEdit

 
Karl Erik Harr, 2006
  • Johanne Nielsdatter (born in Kvæfjord, died 1695) the last Norwegian woman to be executed for witchcraft
  • Mikkel Røg (ca. 1679 in Kvæfjord – ca. 1737) Danish-Norwegian medal engraver to the French Royal Court 1720 to 1737
  • Birger Bergersen (1891 in Kvæfjord – 1977) was a Norwegian anatomist, politician, academic professor, rector, diplomat and chairman of the International Whaling Commission
  • Fritz Aagesen (1935 in Kvæfjord – 1998) a Norwegian author of two books of ghost stories
  • Karl Erik Harr (born 1940 in Kvæfjord) a Norwegian painter, illustrator, graphic artist and author
  • Bendiks H. Arnesen (born 1951 in Kvæfjord) politician, Mayor of Kvæfjord 1986 to 1995
  • Ivar Andreas Forn (born 1983 in Kvæfjord) a retired football goalkeeper with over 100 club caps

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2020). "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2020). "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  6. ^ Mæhlum, Lars, ed. (2019-12-24). "Troms og Finnmark". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 2019-12-26.
  7. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1911). Norske gaardnavne: Troms amt (in Norwegian) (17 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 1.
  8. ^ "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 2018-09-02.
  9. ^ "eKlima Web Portal". Norwegian Meteorological Institute. Archived from the original on 2004-06-14.
  10. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (2016-05-12). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 2018-09-02.
  11. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Troms og Finnmark". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 2019-10-26.
  12. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  13. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Troms Romsa". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 2019-10-26.
  14. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  15. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  16. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  17. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  18. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  19. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  20. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  21. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  22. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  23. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  24. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  25. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  26. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  27. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947. Retrieved 2020-03-18.
  28. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938. Retrieved 2020-03-18.

External linksEdit