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Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017

The Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017 was the fifteenth edition of the annual Junior Eurovision Song Contest, organised by the Georgian Public Broadcaster (GPB) and the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). It took place on 26 November 2017 at the Olympic Palace, in the Georgian capital, Tbilisi. This was the fifth time that the contest was hosted by the previous year's winning country. The visual design and contest slogan, "Shine Bright", were revealed in May 2017.

Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017
Shine Bright
Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017 logo.svg
Dates
Final26 November 2017
Host
VenueOlympic Palace, Tbilisi, Georgia
Presenter(s)Helen Kalandadze
Lizi Japaridze
Directed bySimon Gibney
Gordon Bonello
Executive supervisorJon Ola Sand
Executive producerSergi Gvarjaladze
Host broadcasterGeorgian Public Broadcaster (GPB)
Opening actMariam Mamadashvili with "Mzeo"
All participants with "Shine Bright"
Interval actThe Virus with "Atsabatsa"
Lizi Japaridze and Helen Kalandadze
Georgian Dancers
Participants
Number of entries16
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries Portugal
Withdrawing countries Bulgaria
 Israel
Vote
Voting systemEach country's professional jury award 12, 10, 8–1 points to their 10 favourite songs. International viewers vote for 3-5 songs, and votes are converted to points by proportional representation.
Winning song Russia
"Wings"

Sixteen countries participated in the contest, which saw the return of Portugal for the first time since 2007 and the withdrawals of Bulgaria and Israel. The winner was Polina Bogusevich, who represented Russia with the song "Wings", marking the second time that Russia has won the Junior Eurovision Song Contest, and the first time since The Tolmachevy Twins in 2006, and the third overall victory for the country in any Eurovision-related events. The last victory in any Eurovision event for Russia was when Dima Bilan won the Eurovision Song Contest 2008 in Belgrade. Georgia and Australia finished in second and third place, respectively.

Contents

LocationEdit

 
Olympic Palace of Tbilisi, venue for the 2017 contest
 
Olympic Palace's stage

The EBU confirmed in February 2017 that the contest would be hosted by Georgia.[1] This will be the first Eurovision event hosted by the country, despite them winning a record three times. It was confirmed on 26 February 2017 that Tbilisi would host the contest.[2] On 16 March 2017, it was announced that the Tbilisi Sports Palace would be the host venue for the contest.[3]

However, on 9 August 2017, the venue was changed to the 4,000-capacity Olympic Palace in Tbilisi which was considered more suitable for hosting the contest.[4]

FormatEdit

During the Winner's Press Conference of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2016, Jon Ola Sand - Head of Live Events, announced that the EBU would invite broadcasting members to submit applications to host the 2017 contest, which will take place on 26 November 2017.[5][6] Georgian Public Broadcaster (GPB) announced on 22 November 2016 that they had begun talks with the EBU in connection to hosting the 2017 contest. The first refusal of hosting rights to the winning country of the previous is something that was introduced by the EBU since the 2013 contest.[7]

Visual designEdit

The theme for the contest, Shine Bright, was unveiled on 12 May 2017 during a press conference prior to the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest in Kiev. The emblem is a multi-coloured, stylized sun, representing a "burst" of expression; Jon Ola Sand explained that the theme reflected the goal of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest to give youth "a moment to shine and an opportunity to showcase their full potential as young artists".[8]

HostsEdit

 
Japaridze and Kalandadze during dress rehearsal

On 3 October 2017, it was announced that Helen Kalandadze and Lizi Japaridze would host the contest. Japaridze is the third person under the age of sixteen to ever host the Junior Eurovision Song Contest, after Ioana Ivan in 2006 and Dmytro Borodin in 2009, and also the first former participant to host an edition of the contest. Japaridze previously represented Georgia in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2014, where she placed eleventh with the song "Happy Day". Kalandadze is a television presenter and singer, who previously was a backing singer for Georgia's 2010 Eurovision entry "Shine" by Sofia Nizharadze.[9]

VotingEdit

The results were determined by national juries and an online audience vote. Every country used a national jury that consisted of three music industry professionals and two kids aged between 10 and 15 who were citizens of the country they represent. The first phase of the online voting started on 24 November 2017 when a recap of all the rehearsal performances were shown on the official website before the viewers could vote. Following this recap, voters had the option to watch longer one-minute clips from each participant’s rehearsal. This first round of voting ended on 26 November at 15:59 CET. The second phase of the online voting took place during the live show and started after the last performance and was open for 15 minutes. International viewers could vote for a minimum of three countries and a maximum of five. For the first time, viewers could also vote for their own country’s song.[10]

The amount of points were determined by the percentage of votes received. The public vote counted for 50% of the final result, while the other 50% came from the professional juries.[11]

TrophyEdit

The trophy was designed by Kjell Engman of the Swedish glass company Kosta Boda.Engman also designed the adult contest trophy. From this year, the design of the trophy will be unified and awarded to the subsequent winners. The main trophy is a glass microphone with colored lines inside the upper part, which symbolize the flow of sound.[12]

Participating countriesEdit

On 9 August 2017, it was confirmed that sixteen countries would take part in the contest. Portugal marked their first appearance since 2007, while Bulgaria and Israel withdrew.[4]

Draw Country[4] Artist[13] Song[13] Language(s) Place Points
01   Cyprus Nicole Nicolaou "I Wanna Be a Star" Greek, English 16 45
02   Poland Alicja Rega "Mój Dom" Polish 8 138
03   Netherlands FOURCE "Love Me" Dutch, English 4 156
04   Armenia Misha "Boomerang" Armenian, English 6 148
05   Belarus Helena Meraai "I Am the One" Russian 5 149
06   Portugal Mariana Venâncio "Youtuber" Portuguese 14 54
07   Ireland Muireann McDonnell "Súile Glasa" Irish 15 54
08   Macedonia Mina Blažev "Dancing Through Life" Macedonian, English 12 69
09   Georgia Grigol Kipshidze "Voice of the Heart" Georgian 2 185
10   Albania Ana Kodra "Don't Touch My Tree" Albanian, English 13 67
11   Ukraine Anastasiya Baginska "Don't Stop" Ukrainian, English 7 147
12   Malta Gianluca Cilia "Dawra Tond" English, Maltese 9 107
13   Russia Polina Bogusevich "Wings" Russian, English 1 188
14   Serbia Irina Brodić & Jana Paunović "Ceo svet je naš" Serbian 10 92
15   Australia Isabella Clarke "Speak Up" English 3 172
16   Italy Maria Iside Fiore "Scelgo (My Choice)" Italian, English 11 86

ScoresheetEdit

 
Polina Bogusevich with the trophy
Results
                                   
  Cyprus 45 40 2 1 2
Poland 138 61 1 10 6 4 5 12 7 2 8 3 6 5 1 6 1
Netherlands 156 112 5 4 10 6 1 4 4 5 5
Armenia 148 56 12 10 8 8 2 10 10 10 7 10 2 3
Belarus 149 69 6 5 2 7 10 1 5 5 5 2 12 8 4 8
Portugal 54 45 2 4 3
Ireland 54 42 3 3 1 1 4
Macedonia 69 41 1 3 3 1 1 4 6 5 3 1
Georgia 185 42 3 12 7 12 12 7 10 10 12 12 10 12 8 10 6
Albania 67 35 8 7 3 2 4 8
Ukraine 147 67 7 6 5 8 5 4 3 6 8 2 4 3 12 7
Malta 107 81 6 2 1 5 12
Russia 188 66 10 8 8 4 10 12 5 12 12 7 5 8 7 12 2
Serbia 92 44 3 4 2 6 8 3 4 7 2 2 7
Australia 172 79 2 7 12 5 7 6 8 4 7 1 8 3 7 6 10
Italy 86 49 4 1 3 6 6 1 6 10

Jury 12 pointsEdit

N. Contestant Voting nation
6 Georgia Albania, Armenia, Belarus, Poland, Russia, Ukraine
4 Russia Australia, Georgia, Macedonia, Portugal
1 Armenia Cyprus
Australia Netherlands
Belarus Malta
Malta Italy
Poland Ireland
Ukraine Serbia

Other countriesEdit

For a country to be eligible for potential participation in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest, it needs to be an active member of the European Broadcasting Union (EBU).[14] It is currently unknown whether the EBU issue invitations of participation to all 56 active members like they do for the Eurovision Song Contest.

Active EBU membersEdit

  •   Austria – The Austrian national broadcaster, ORF, announced on 31 May 2017 that they would not debut in the contest in 2017, with no intention to participate for the next few years.[15]
  •   Bulgaria – On 23 May 2017, the Bulgarian national broadcaster, Bulgarian National Television (BNT), provisionally confirmed their participation in the 2017 contest.[16] However, on 7 June 2017, it was revealed that due to the election of the company's new Director-General, that the broadcaster had withdrawn its application.[17] On 22 September 2017, it was announced that Bulgaria would not participate in the contest.[18]
  •   Croatia – The Croatian national broadcaster, Hrvatska radiotelevizija (HRT), had confirmed that the broadcaster was looking at the possibility of returning to the contest in 2017. However, Croatia was not on the final list of participants released by the EBU.[19]
  •   Hungary – On 13 July 2017, Hungarian national broadcaster Médiaszolgáltatás-támogató és Vagyonkezelő Alap (MTVA) stated that they were not ruling out a debut at the 2017 contest.[20] However, on 25 July 2017, MTVA announced that they would not debut in 2017.[21]
  •   Israel – The Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA) shut down on 9 May 2017.[22] The new broadcasting network Israeli Public Broadcasting Corporation (IPBC, "KAN") was not a member of the EBU at the time, which was a requirement to participate in the contest.[23] It was revealed on 6 July 2017 that an agreement had been signed between the EBU and IPBC, allowing the broadcaster to participate in EBU contests such as the Junior Eurovision Song Contest, despite not having full membership.[24] Israel was not on the final list of participants released by the EBU.

The following broadcasters publicly declined to participate in the contest without providing any further explanations:

International broadcasts and votingEdit

Voting and spokespersonsEdit

  1.   Cyprus – Maria Christophorou[38]
  2.   Poland – Dominika Ptak
  3.   Netherlands – Thijs Schlimback[39]
  4.   Armenia – Lilit Tokhatyan
  5.   Belarus – Saba Karazanashvili[40]
  6.   Portugal – Duarte Valença
  7.   Ireland – Walter McCabe
  8.   Macedonia – Kjara Blažev[41]
  9.   Georgia – Lizi Tavberidze (Georgian representative at JESC 2015 as part of Virus)[42]
  10.   Albania – Sabjana Rizvanu[43]
  11.   Ukraine – Sofia Rol (Ukrainian representative at JESC 2016)[44]
  12.   Malta – Mariam Andghuladze[45]
  13.   Russia – Tonya Volodina
  14.   Serbia – Mina Grujić
  15.   Australia – Liam Clarke
  16.   Italy – Sofia Bartoli[46]

CommentatorsEdit

Participating countriesEdit

Non-participating countriesEdit

Official albumEdit

Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017: Tbilisi
Compilation album by
Released10 November 2017
GenrePop
Length47:11
LabelUniversal
Junior Eurovision Song Contest chronology
Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2016: Valletta
(2016)
Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017: Tbilisi
(2017)
Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2018: Minsk
(2018)

Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017: Tbilisi, is a compilation album put together by the European Broadcasting Union, and was released by Universal Music Group on 10 November 2017. The album features all the songs from the 2017 contest.[60]

No.TitleArtistLength
1."Don't Touch My Tree"Ana Kodra (Albania)3:01
2."Boomerang"Misha (Armenia)2:58
3."Speak Up"Isabella Clarke (Australia)2:57
4."I Am the One"Helena Meraai (Belarus)3:01
5."I Wanna Be a Star"Nicole Nicolaou (Cyprus)3:01
6."Voice of the Heart"Grigol Kipshidze (Georgia)3:01
7."Súile glasa"Muireann McDonnell (Ireland)2:57
8."Scelgo (My Choice)"Maria Iside Fiore (Italy)2:54
9."Dancing Through Life"Mina Blažev (Macedonia)3:01
10."Dawra tond"Gianluca Cilia (Malta)2:41
11."Love Me"FOURCE (Netherlands)3:02
12."Mój dom"Alicja Rega (Poland)3:00
13."Youtuber"Mariana Venâncio (Portugal)2:58
14."Ceo svet je naš"Irina Brodić & Jana Paunović (Serbia)2:47
15."Wings"Polina Bogusevich (Russia)2:54
16."Don't Stop"Anastasiya Baginska (Ukraine)2:58
Total length:47:11

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Georgia to host the 2017 Junior Eurovision Song Contest". junioreurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. 1 February 2017. Retrieved 1 February 2017.
  2. ^ Granger, Anthony (26 February 2017). "Tbilisi to Host the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix.
  3. ^ "Junior Eurovision 2017 to take place on 26th November!". junioreurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. 16 March 2017. Retrieved 16 March 2017.
  4. ^ a b c Jordan, Paul (9 August 2017). "16 Countries to dazzle on stage in Tbilisi in 2017!". junioreurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 9 August 2017.
  5. ^ Granger, Anthony (16 March 2017). "Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2017 to be held on November 26". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix.
  6. ^ Escudero, Victor (20 November 2016). "Winners' Press Conference with Mariam from Georgia". junioreurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 21 November 2016. We will work hard over the next year to find a host and to make another great show in November next year
  7. ^ Granger, Anthony (22 November 2016). "Georgia begins talks regarding hosting Junior Eurovision 2017". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix. Retrieved 23 November 2016.
  8. ^ Jordan, Paul (12 May 2017). "Georgia is Shining Bright as preparations begin for the Junior Eurovision 2017". junioreurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 12 May 2017.
  9. ^ Jordan, Paul (3 October 2017). "Meet the hosts of Junior Eurovision 2017!". junioreurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 3 October 2017.
  10. ^ "Voting in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest". Eurovoix. 10 November 2017. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  11. ^ "Voting - Junior Eurovision Song Contest — Tbilisi 2017". junioreurovision.tv. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  12. ^ "Junior Eurovision 2017 Trophy Revealed". Eurovoix. 21 November 2017. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  13. ^ a b "Tbilisi 2017 - Junior Eurovision Song Contest — Tbilisi 2017". junioreurovision.tv. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  14. ^ Yakovlev, Vladislav (23 January 2014). "Junior Eurovision Song Contest steering group". EBU. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 26 May 2014.
  15. ^ Herbert, Emily. "Austria: Will Not Debut In Junior Eurovision This Year". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 31 May 2017.
  16. ^ García, Belén (23 May 2017). "Bulgaria confirms participation at Junior Eurovision 2017". esc-plus.com. ESC+Plus. Retrieved 23 May 2017.
  17. ^ Granger, Anthony (7 June 2017). "Bulgaria: Rescinds Confirmation of Participation in Junior Eurovision 2017". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  18. ^ Gligorov, Miki (22 September 2017). "Bulgaria: BNT won't partake at Junior Eurovision 2017". escxtra.com. Retrieved 22 September 2017.
  19. ^ Granger, Anthony (23 May 2017). "Croatia HRT considering a return to Junior Eurovision". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix. Retrieved 23 May 2017.
  20. ^ "Hungría parece no haber descartado la posibilidad de debutar en JESC 2017". 13 July 2017. Retrieved 13 July 2017.
  21. ^ "Hungría no participará en Eurovision Junior 2017". 25 July 2017. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  22. ^ "Public broadcasters reduced to tears over sudden shutdown". Retrieved 14 May 2017.
  23. ^ "Israel's National Broadcaster No Longer Meets EBU Requirements". Eurovoix. 7 April 2017. Retrieved 14 May 2017.
  24. ^ Granger, Anthony (6 July 2017). "Israel: IPBC Can Still Compete in EBU Contests Despite Lacking Full Membership". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 7 July 2017.
  25. ^ Herbert, Emily (30 May 2017). "Belgium: Will Not Return To Junior Eurovision This Year". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 30 May 2017.
  26. ^ Granger, Anthony (26 May 2017). "Denmark: Will Not Return To Junior Eurovision This Year". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 26 May 2017.
  27. ^ Granger, Anthony (25 June 2017). "Estonia: ERR Has No Plans To Participate in Junior Eurovision 2017". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 25 June 2017.
  28. ^ Herbert, Emily (2 June 2017). "Finland: Will Not Debut In Junior Eurovision This Year". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 2 June 2017.
  29. ^ Granger, Anthony (27 June 2017). "Iceland: RÚV Rules Out Junior Eurovision Debut". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  30. ^ Granger, Anthony (19 May 2017). "Latvia will not return to Junior Eurovision in 2017". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 20 May 2017.
  31. ^ "Lituania no regresará a Eurovision Junior en 2017". NoticiasESC. 12 July 2017. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  32. ^ "Moldova: Discarded for Eurovision Junior 2017?".
  33. ^ Granger, Anthony (18 May 2017). "Slovenia no return to Junior Eurovision in 2017". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix. Retrieved 18 May 2017.
  34. ^ Vilanova, Matt (3 July 2017). "Spain will not take part in Junior Eurovision 2017". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix. Retrieved 3 July 2017.
  35. ^ Herbert, Emily (24 May 2017). "Sweden will not return to Junior Eurovision in 2017". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  36. ^ Granger, Anthony (22 May 2017). "Switzerland RSI rules out return to Junior Eurovision in 2017". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix. Retrieved 23 May 2017.
  37. ^ Granger, Anthony (25 May 2017). "United Kingdom ITV will not return to Junior Eurovision in 2017". eurovoix.com. Eurovoix. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  38. ^ Herbert, Emily (24 November 2017). "Cyprus: Maria Christophorou Announced As Junior Eurovision Spokesperson". Eurovoix.
  39. ^ Herbert, Emily (24 November 2017). "The Netherlands: Thijs Schlimback Announced As Junior Eurovision Spokesperson". Eurovoix.
  40. ^ "Instagram post by Official Club OGAE Belarus 🇧🇾😉 • Nov 22, 2017 at 11:42am UTC". Instagram. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  41. ^ Herbert, Emily (24 November 2017). "FYR Macedonia: Kjara Blažev Announced As Junior Eurovision Spokesperson". Eurovoix.
  42. ^ "Georgia: Lizi Tavberidze Revealed As Spokesperson". Eurovoix. Retrieved 24 November 2017.
  43. ^ Herbert, Emily (24 November 2017). "Albania: Commentator and Spokesperson Revealed". Eurovoix.
  44. ^ "Ukraine: Sofia Rol Revealed as Spokesperson". Eurovoix. Retrieved 24 November 2017.
  45. ^ Herbert, Emily (24 November 2017). "Malta: Mariam Andghuladze Announced As Junior Eurovision Spokesperson". Eurovoix.
  46. ^ Herbert, Emily (24 November 2017). "Italy: Sofia Bartoli Announced As Junior Eurovision Spokesperson". Eurovoix.
  47. ^ Farren, Neil (24 November 2017). "Albania: Commentator and Spokesperson Revealed". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 25 November 2017.
  48. ^ "Australia: Trio To Commentate on Junior Eurovision 2017". Eurovoix. 20 November 2017. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  49. ^ "Belarus: Evgeny Perlin Announced As Junior Eurovision 2017 Commentator". Eurovoix. 20 November 2017. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  50. ^ "Italy: Laura Carusino & Mario Acampa To Commentate on Junior Eurovision 2017". Eurovoix. 20 November 2017. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  51. ^ "Poland: Junior Eurovision Moves To TVP2 For 2017". Eurovoix. 2 November 2017. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  52. ^ "Eurovisão Júnior da Canção 2017 - Entretenimento - RTP". www.rtp.pt. RTP. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  53. ^ Costa, Nelson (15 November 2017). "Portugal: Nuno Galopim junta-se a Hélder Reis nos comentários do Festival Eurovisão Júnior". escportugal.pt (in Portuguese). Retrieved 25 November 2017.
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  55. ^ "Дечја песма Евровизије 2017". RTS. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  56. ^ "Ukraine: Timur Miroshnychenko To Commentate on Junior Eurovision 2017". Eurovoix. 22 November 2017. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  57. ^ Farren, Neil (22 November 2017). "Israel: KAN to Broadcast Junior Eurovision 2017". Eurovoix. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  58. ^ Farren, Neil (19 November 2017). "Kazakhstan: Delegation Sent to Junior Eurovision 2017". Eurovoix.
  59. ^ "Junior Eurovision'17: Where To Watch the Show". Eurovoix.com. 26 November 2017. Retrieved 24 December 2017.
  60. ^ "Junior Eurovision Song Contest Tbilisi 2017". open.spotify.com. Spotify. Retrieved 10 November 2017. Track listing

External linksEdit