Guangzhou F.C.

  (Redirected from Guangzhou Evergrande Taobao F.C.)

Guangzhou Football Club, formerly known as Guangzhou Evergrande Football Club, is a professional Chinese football club that participates in the Chinese Super League under the license of the Chinese Football Association. The team is based in Guangzhou, Guangdong, and their home stadium is the Tianhe Stadium which has a seating capacity of 54,856. Their majority shareholders are the Evergrande Real Estate Group (56.71%) and the e-commerce company Alibaba Group (37.81%),[4][5][6][7] while the rest of the shares are traded in the Chinese OTC system.

Guangzhou
Guangzhou Evergrande Taobao logo.svg
Full nameGuangzhou Football Club
Nickname(s)South China Tigers (华南虎)[1]
FoundedJune 1954; 66 years ago (June 1954)
(as Guangzhou Football Team)[2]
GroundTianhe Stadium
Capacity54,856
Owner
Evergrande Group(56.71%)
Alibaba Group(37.81%)
Other shareholders (NEEQ834338)(5.48%)
ChairmanZheng Zhi[3]
ManagerFabio Cannavaro
LeagueChinese Super League
2020CSL, 2nd of 16
WebsiteClub website
Guangzhou F.C.
Traditional Chinese廣州足球俱樂部
Simplified Chinese广州足球俱乐部

The club was founded in 1954, and won several second tier titles before turning professional in 1993. Their results improved, leading to a runners-up spot in China's top tier. Unable to improve upon these results, the club went through a period of stagnation and decline before they experienced a brief revival, when they won the 2007 second division. In 2009, the club was embroiled in a match-fixing scandal and they were punished with relegation. The Evergrande Real Estate Group decided to purchase the club and pumped significant funds into the team. They immediately won promotion and gained their first top tier title in the 2011 season. The club is the only Chinese football club to win the AFC Champions League twice, in 2013 and 2015. The club is also the first Chinese club to participate in the FIFA Club World Cup, making its first appearance in 2013.

According to Forbes report from 2016, the team was valued at US$282 million, the most out of all Chinese football teams, with a reported operating loss of over US$200 million in 2015.[8]

HistoryEdit

In June 1954, the local Guangzhou sports body founded Guangzhou Football Team to take part in the newly formed Chinese national football league.[2] They entered the club in the 1955 league season and named Luo Dizhi as their first manager. He guided them to an eighth spot finish in their debut campaign.[9] The league had grown to incorporate a second tier and their debut season performance final standing relegated them to the second division. Guangzhou won the division championship, however the Chinese Football Association decided to restructure the league at the beginning of the 1957 season and Guangzhou were denied promotion.[10] Despite this, Luo Rongman managed the team to win the 1958 second division title; however, the club were unable to gain promotion because this time they went into receivership. They were not re-established until April 1961 and were allowed to take part in the top tier. Back within the top division Guangzhou often struggled within the league and were again relegated to the second tier at the end of the 1963 league season. They remained there until 1966 when the Cultural Revolution halted football in China.[11]

When the Chinese football league restarted, Guangzhou took the unusual step of abstaining from the competition and instead on 26 October 1977 brought Luo Rongman to manage their youth team.[12] The team played within the National Youth League until 1980 when it was decided that they were mature enough to play in the senior football league pyramid. They started in the recently established third division. The club's youth team development immediately paid off and players such as Mai Chao, Zhao Dayu and later Wu Qunli all rapidly rose into Chinese international footballers. Guangzhou gained successive promotions until they reached the top tier. At the end of the 1982 league season Guangzhou were relegated again. They returned to the top division at the end of the 1984 season via the Chinese FA Cup. With this promotion on 1 October 1984, the club was the first Chinese team to gain sponsorship when Guangzhou Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. signed a $200,000 annual deal with the club.[13]

Throughout the 1990s, the Chinese Football Association were demanding more professionalism from their football teams. Guangzhou was one of the first fully professional football clubs in China after the Apollo Group took over the club on 8 January 1993. The investment aided the manager Zhou Sui'an to help create a competitive squad. Hu Zhijun won the top goalscoring award. Guangzhou were able to gain a runners-up spot in the 1994 league season.[14] The following season Zhou Sui'an left the team after having twice guided the club to a runners-up position within the league and a runners-up spot against Shanghai in the 1991 Chinese FA Cup. After his exit, the club were unable to replicate the same results. When influential international footballers Peng Weiguo and Hu Zhijun left the club, the team went into free fall and were relegated at the end of the 1998 league season.[15] With the management concerned about the team's performance, an investigation was launched which discovered that Wen Junwu and three other players were in collusion with gambling groups and were immediately expelled from the club.[16] In 2001, the Guangzhou Sports Bureau took over the club again. With significant investment coming from the Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Co., Ltd it was hoped that the club could push for promotion. The division was rocked by a match-fixing scandal involving Changchun Yatai, Chengdu Wuniu, Jiangsu Sainty and Zhejing Greentown. Guangzhou's new sponsors Geely immediately pulled their funding from the team to distance themselves from the bad publicity.[17] The club went through a tough transitional period until the Sunray Cave Group took over the club in 2004 and started to invest money in hopes of pushing for promotion.[18] When the Guangzhou Pharmaceuticals group took over the club in 2006, they were able to realize the ambition of gaining promotion. The club won the 2007 second division title and entry to the Chinese Super League.[19] In February 2010, Guangzhou was relegated back to the China League One in the fallout of a match-fixing scandal despite having achieved a ninth-place finish in the 2009 season.[20] The match in question was the 19 August 2006 league game against Shanxi Luhu, which Guangzhou won 5–1 when they were still playing in the China League One. It was discovered by the police that the Guangzhou general manager Yang Xu paid ¥200,000 to the opposing general manager Wang Po to secure a win at home and that Guangzhou's vice presidents Wu Xiaodong and Xie Bin knew about it.[21] With the offending participants sentenced to jail for fraud, the club was put up for sale.[22] On 28 February 2010, Evergrande Real Estate Group took over the club for a fee of ¥100 million. Xu Jiayin, chairman of Evergrande Real Estate Group, said that they would pump more funds into the transfer market.[23] His first act was to sign in Chinese national team striker Gao Lin from Shanghai Shenhua for a reported fee of ¥6 million. Then, he replaced the head coach Peng Weiguo with former Beijing Guoan manager Lee Jang-soo with no indication. In the 2010 summer transfer window, the club signed Sun Xiang, the first Chinese footballer to play in the UEFA Champions League with PSV Eindhoven, and the Chinese national team captain Zheng Zhi on 28 June 2010. On 30 June 2010, Guangzhou confirmed that they had signed Muriqui on a four-year deal from Campeonato Brasileiro Série A side Atlético Mineiro with a domestic record fee of ¥23 million.[24] On 30 October 2010, Guangzhou became League One champions for the second time and returned to the Super League after a 3–1 win against Hunan Billows.[25]

During the 2011 season, Guangzhou Evergrande further strengthened its squad with the purchase of Argentinean Dario Conca and Brazilian Cléo.[26] Although the team was promoted to the Super League in the first year, they clinched the league title in late September 2011 although there were four games yet to play.[27] In March 2012, Guangzhou played and won their first-ever AFC Champions League match, defeating South Korean champions Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors 5–1.[28] In addition, Paraguayan Lucas Barrios left the German champions Borussia Dortmund in summer 2012 to join Guangzhou Evergrande.[29] Marcello Lippi replaced Lee Jang-soo as the head coach and brought in South Korean defender Kim Young-gwon and Chinese midfielder Huang Bowen.[30] Guangzhou was knocked out of the 2012 AFC Champions League when they lost 5–4 on aggregate to Al-Ittihad in the quarter-finals.[31] They became the first Chinese side to reach the quarter-finals since 2006. During the 2012 season, Guangzhou won the league for the second time in a row, becoming the first team in China to win the Super League title twice in a row, while also securing the Chinese FA Cup to become double winners for 2012.[32]

In the 2013 season, Guangzhou Evergrande strengthened their squad by signing Chinese goalkeeper Zeng Cheng and Brazilian Elkeson.[33][34] This proved to be beneficial to Guangzhou as they became the first team in China to win the Super League three times in a row.[35] The club also won the 2013 AFC Champions League by defeating FC Seoul in the final on the away goals rule, after drawing 2–2 in the first leg in Seoul and 1–1 in the second leg in Guangzhou, becoming the first Chinese side to win the tournament since 1990.[36] By winning the AFC Champions League, Guangzhou was assured a place in the 2013 FIFA Club World Cup, entering in the quarter-finals, beating the African champions Al-Ahly 2–0.[37] In the semi-finals, they were defeated by the European champions Bayern Munich 3–0.[38] In the third place match, the club lost against the South American champions Atlético Mineiro 3–2 and finished in fourth place.[39] Guangzhou won its fourth and fifth consecutive Chinese Super League titles in 2014 and 2015, respectively.[40] On 21 November 2015, the club won its second continental championship, defeating Al-Ahli 1–0 on aggregate in the 2015 AFC Champions League Final.[41] In the 2015 FIFA Club World Cup, Guangzhou won 2–1 against Club América in the quarter-finals before losing 3–0 against Barcelona in the semi-finals.[42][43] Guangzhou also lost the third place match 2–1 against Hiroshima Sanfrecce, ending up in the same position as in the 2013 edition.[44]

In the 2019 season, Guangzhou Evergrande won their eight Super League title with Beijing Guoan finishing in second place.[45]

GroundsEdit

As of the 2021 season, Guangzhou play at Tianhe Stadium with a capacity for 54,856 spectators. In May 2020, construction work began on the new 100,000-capacity stadium. Completion is scheduled for December 2022, in time to host the opening ceremony of the 2023 AFC Asian Cup.[46]

Ownership and naming historyEdit

Year Owner Club name Sponsored team name
1954–55 Central and Southern China Institute of Sports Central and Southern China Sports Institute Football Team Central and Southern China White
1955 Guangzhou
1956 Central and Southern China White
1956–57 Guangzhou Institute of Sports Guangzhou Institute of Sports Football Team
1958 Guangzhou Football Team
1959–61 Guangzhou Public Security Bureau Guangzhou Vanguard Football Team
1962–66 Guangzhou Sports Bureau Guangzhou Football Team
1977–79 Guangzhou Youth Football Team
1980–84 Guangzhou Football Team
1985–89 Guangzhou Baiyun
1989–93 Guangzhou Football Club
1993–00 Guangdong Apollo Group Guangzhou Apollo Football Club
2001–02 Guangzhou Sports Bureau Guangzhou Football Club Guangzhou Geely
2002–03 Guangzhou Xiangxue
2004–05 Sunray Cave Group Guangzhou Sunray Cave
2005–07 Guangzhou Pharmaceutical Holdings Guangzhou GPC Football Club
2008 Guangzhou GPC Zhongyi
2009 Guangzhou GPC Baiyunshan
2010 Guangzhou Sports Bureau Guangzhou Football Club
2010 Evergrande Real Estate Group Guangzhou Evergrande Football Club Guangzhou GAC
2011–2014
2014–2015 Evergrande Real Estate Group (50%→60%)
Alibaba Group (50%→40%)
Guangzhou Evergrande Taobao Football Club
2016–2020 Evergrande Real Estate Group (56.71%)
Alibaba Group (37.81%)
Other shareholders in NEEQ (5.48%)
2021– Guangzhou Football Club

SponsorshipEdit

Period Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
1994 Umbro
1995 Reebok 三菱汽车 (Mitsubishi Motors)
1996 Diadora
1997 Reebok
1998 Ucan 三菱戈蓝 (Mitsubishi Galant)
1999 太阳神 (Apollo)
2000 广东全球通 (Guangdong GoTone)
2001 吉利汽车 (Geely Motors)
2002–2003 香雪制药 (Xiangxue Pharmaceutical)
2004 中一药业 (Zhongyi Pharmaceutical)
2005 天河城 (Teem Plaza)
2006–2007 Godedke 广药 (Guangzhou Pharmaceuticals)
2008–2009 Nike 广药中一 (Guangzhou Pharmaceuticals Zhongyi)
2010–2013 恒大 (Evergrande)
2014–2015 东风日产启辰 (Dongfeng–Nissan Venucia)
2016–2017 恒大金服 (Evergrande financial service)
2017 恒大旅游集团 (Evergrande travel group)
2018 恒大文化旅游城 (Evergrande cultural tourism city)
2019 恒大 (Evergrande)
2020 恒驰 (Hengchi)

RivalriesEdit

When professionalism was established within the Chinese football leagues in 1994, it allowed more than one team to play within each region. This saw the establishment of Guangzhou Matsunichi which used to be the youth academy of Guangzhou FC before being sold to Matsunichi Digital Holdings Limited.[47] Direct ties between these two teams also saw them share the Yuexiushan Stadium. In their first meeting in the first round of the 1995 Chinese FA Cup, Matsunichi beat Guangzhou FC 4–3 on aggregate.[48] For a brief period during the 1998 season, both teams were in the top tier with Matsunichi finishing higher than Guangzhou FC; however, the rivalry would reach its peak and subsequent conclusion during the 2000 season with both clubs in the second tier fighting relegation. On 15 July 2000, Guangzhou FC won 3–1 against Matsunichi which inevitability helped lead to Matsunichi's relegation, causing Matsunichi to disband at the end of the season.[49][50]

When Guangzhou R&F moved to the city of Guangzhou, a local derby, often referred to as the Canton derby, was born.[51] The first Canton derby was at Yuexiushan Stadium on 16 March 2012 as Guangzhou Evergrande lost 2–0 against Guangzhou R&F.[52] Relations between the two club owners remain cordial off the pitch and club owners Xu Jiayin and Zhang Li were seen enjoying a meal together instead of watching the second derby in 2012, which Guangzhou R&F also won.[53][54]

Current squadEdit

As of 24 February 2020[55][56]

First team squadEdit

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK   CHN Liu Shibo
2 DF   CHN Jiang Guangtai
3 DF   CHN Mei Fang
5 DF   CHN Zhang Linpeng
6 MF   CHN Liao Lisheng
7 FW   CHN Wei Shihao
8 MF   BRA PaulinhoFP (3rd captain)
9 FW   CHN Ai Kesen
10 MF   CHN Zheng Zhi (captain)
11 MF   CHN Zhang Xiuwei
13 GK   CHN Liu Weiguo
14 MF   CHN Tan Kaiyuan
15 MF   CHN Yan Dinghao
16 MF   CHN Huang Bowen
No. Pos. Nation Player
17 FW   CHN Yang Liyu
19 FW   BRA Fernando HenriqueLP
20 FW   BRA Aloísio LP
21 DF   CHN Gao Zhunyi
22 FW   CHN Parmanjan Kyum
23 DF   KOR Park Ji-sooFP
24 DF   CHN Wang Shilong
25 DF   CHN Deng Hanwen
26 MF   BRA Anderson TaliscaFP
27 DF   CHN Wu Shaocong
32 GK   CHN Liu Dianzuo
33 MF   CHN Zhong Yihao
35 DF   CHN Li Xuepeng
36 MF   CHN He Chao
38 DF   CHN Liu Yiming

Remarks:
LP These players are registered as local players in Chinese domestic football competitions.
FP These players are registered as foreign players in Chinese domestic football competitions.

Reserve squadEdit

As of 10 July 2019

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
43 MF   CHN Huang Guangliang
44 GK   CHN Zhang Jianzhi
46 MF   CHN Zheng Shengxiong
47 MF   CHN Wu Yuxiang
52 MF   CHN Zhao Shizhuo
53 MF   CHN Zhu Fu
54 DF   CHN Chen Hongwei
No. Pos. Nation Player
55 FW   CHN Rao Weiquan
56 MF   CHN Li Geng
57 MF   CHN Xie Zifeng
59 FW   CHN Elfirat Iminjan
60 FW   CHN Bughrahan Skandar
61 DF   CHN Zhou Chenye
62 MF   CHN Zhang Junye

Unregistered playersEdit

As of 1 March 2019

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
DF   CHN Hu Ruibao
MF   CHN Cai Mingmin
DF   CHN Luo Hanbowen
GK   CHN Li Weijie
DF   CHN Chen Zepeng
DF   CHN Guan Haojin
DF   CHN Liu Ruicheng
DF   CHN Situ Hualong
DF   CHN Wen Haojun
DF   CHN Wu Yuduo
No. Pos. Nation Player
DF   CHN Zhang Zichao
DF   CHN Zhou Wenxin
DF   CHN Liu Haidong
MF   CHN Ju Feng
MF   CHN Yang Xin
MF   CHN Ke Yuan
MF   CHN Shewket Yalqun
MF   CHN Wang Junhui
MF   CHN Wu Yue
FW   CHN Ye Guochen

Club officialsEdit

Coaching staffEdit

Position Name
Head coach   Fabio Cannavaro
Assistant coaches   Paolo Cannavaro
  Antonio Rogazzo
  Ciccio Troise
Goalkeeping coach   Patrizio Franco Cotugno
Fitness coach   Giam Piero Ventrone
Medical adviser   Enrico Castellacci
Team doctor / Physiotherapist   Silvano Cotti
Scout   Vincenzo Bevo
Reserve team head coach   Chang Weiwei
Reserve team assistant coach   Li Kun
  Liu Zhiyu
Reserve team goalkeeping coach   Wang Weiman
Reserve team Physiotherapist   Wan Bingfeng
Youth department director / U-19 team coach   Stefan Böger

Managerial historyEdit

Club honoursEdit

All-time honours list, including those achieved during the club's semi-professional period.[57][58]

DomesticEdit

LeaguesEdit

Runners-up (2): 1992, 1994
Winners (8): 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019
Runners-up (2): 2018, 2020
  • Chinese Second Division / Jia-B League (second division until 2003)
Winners (3): 1956, 1958, 1981
Runners-up (2): 1983, 1990
Winners (2): 2007, 2010
  • Chinese Third Division
Runners-up (1): 1980

CupsEdit

Winners (2): 2012, 2016
Runners-up (2): 1991, 2013
Winners (4): 2012, 2016, 2017, 2018
Runners-up (3): 2013, 2014, 2015

InternationalEdit

Winners (2): 2013, 2015
Fourth place (2): 2013, 2015

ResultsEdit

All-time league rankingsEdit

[59][60]

Year Div Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Pos. FA Cup Super Cup League Cup AFC Other
1955 1 10 3 1 6 12 33 −21 7 8
1956 2 5 4 1 0 13 1 +12 14 1a DNQ
1957 2 5b NH
1958 2 5 4 1 0 13 5 +8 14b 1 NH
1961 1 NH
1962 1 7 1 4 2 4 5 –1 6b 25 NH
1963 1 8 0 3 5 4 14 –10 3b 20 NH
1964 2 7b NH
1965 2 6b NH
1980 3 8 3 4 1 13 4 +9 10b 2 NH
1981 2 30 24 6 48 1 NH
1982 1 30 9 21 23 53 −30 18 15 NH
1983 2 15 11 4 22 2a NH
1984 2 3c 8th
1985 1 15 8 7 +6 17 7 4th DNQ
1986 1 14 6 4 4 14 13 +1 16 7 DNE DNQ
1987 1 14 5 1 8 14 19 −5 16 7 NH DNQ
1988 1 25 10 10 5 32 19 +13 43 7 NH DNQ
1989 1 14 1 5 8 8 22 −14 10 8 NH DNQ
1990 2 22 8 11 3 27 15 +12 35 2 R1 DNQ
1991 1 14 4 7 3 16 13 +3 16 4 RU DNQ
1992 1 14 8 2 4 19 15 +4 18 2 R1 DNQ
1993 1 6b 2 0/3d 1 8 7 +1 4b 8 NH DNQ
1994 1 22 11 5 6 36 27 +9 27 2 NH DNQ
1995 1 22 7 7 8 28 27 +1 28 5 R1 DNQ DNQ
1996 1 22 7 8 7 26 25 +1 29 7 R16 DNQ DNQ
1997 1 22 5 10 7 14 20 −6 25 8 R16 DNQ DNQ
1998 1 26 4 8 14 25 41 −16 20 14 R1 DNQ DNQ
1999 2 22 6 8 8 26 30 −4 26 8 R2 DNQ DNQ
2000 2 22 6 7 9 27 27 0 25 10 R1 DNQ DNQ
2001 2 22 11 7 4 31 16 +15 40 4 R1 DNQ DNQ
2002 2 22 4 9 9 23 30 −7 21 11 R1 DNQ DNQ
2003 2 26 13 9 4 40 20 +20 48 3 R1 DNQ DNQ
2004 2 32 12 16 4 47 29 +18 52 4 R1 NH DNQ DNQ
2005 2 26 15 7 4 50 22 +28 52 4 R2 NH DNQ DNQ
2006 2 24 15 3 6 45 25 +20 48 3 R2 NH NH DNQ
2007 2 24 19 4 1 65 15 +50 61 1 NH NH NH DNQ
2008 1 30 10 10 10 41 42 −1 40 7 NH NH NH DNQ
2009 1 30 9 10 11 38 38 0 37 9e NH NH NH DNQ
2010 2 24 17 6 1 61 21 +40 57 1 NH NH NH DNQ
2011 1 30 20 8 2 67 23 +44 68 1 R2 NH NH DNQ
2012 1 30 17 7 6 51 30 +21 58 1 W W NH QF
2013 1 30 24 5 1 78 18 +60 77 1 RU RU NH W CWC 4th
2014 1 30 22 4 4 76 28 +48 70 1 R4 RU NH QF
2015 1 30 19 10 1 71 28 +43 67 1 R3 RU NH W CWC 4th
2016 1 30 19 7 4 62 19 +43 64 1 W W NH Group
2017 1 30 20 4 6 69 42 +27 64 1 SF W NH QF
2018 1 30 20 3 7 82 36 +46 63 2 R5 W NH R16
2019 1 30 23 3 4 68 24 +44 72 1 QF DNQ NH SF
2020 1 14 11 1 2 31 12 +19 34 2f R2 Cancelledg NH Group
2021 1 NH NH TBD
Notes

No league games in 1959, 1966–1972, 1975, and 1976; Guangzhou did not enter the league in 1960, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1978, and 1979.
^a No promotion. ^b In final group stage. ^c In Changsha Group (first round). ^d Drawn matches were decided on penalties after 90 minutes. ^e Relegated for match-fixing scandal.
^f Lost in championship finals; in the regular season, Guangzhou finished first in Group A. ^g Not played due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Key

International resultsEdit

Records and statisticsEdit

Past and present internationalsEdit

Names in bold indicate players who had international appearances for their countries while playing for Guangzhou.[61]

Notes and referencesEdit

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  5. ^ "Alibaba buys half of Chinese soccer club for $192 mln". Reuters. 5 June 2014. Retrieved 24 November 2014.
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  12. ^ 广州白云队卅年纪念赛 快乐足球忆光辉岁月. news.dayoo.com (in Chinese). 19 January 2009. Archived from the original on 19 January 2012. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
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  21. ^ "广州足协官员接受调查 公安部督办恐与赌球有关". sports.163.com (in Chinese). 4 November 2009. Archived from the original on 8 November 2009. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  22. ^ "List of individuals, clubs punished by CFA for soccer fraud". news.xinhuanet.com. 18 February 2013. Archived from the original on 3 November 2014. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  23. ^ "广州足球新东家:恒大1亿买断股权 广汽冠名赞助". sports.sohu.com (in Chinese). 2 March 2010. Retrieved 23 November 2020.
  24. ^ "恒大引援再放超级卫星 350万美元天价签巴西猎豹". sports.sina.com.cn (in Chinese). 30 June 2010. Retrieved 10 July 2013.
  25. ^ "郜林半场上演帽子戏法 恒大3-1胜湖南获中甲冠军". sports.sina.com.cn (in Chinese). 30 October 2010. Retrieved 3 November 2012.
  26. ^ Church, Michael (24 December 2016). "Chinese transfer record broken five times in 2016 as Oscar arrives". ESPN. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  27. ^ "CSL 2011". Soccerway. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  28. ^ "Jeonbuk Motors vs. Guangzhou Evergrande 1–5". Soccerway. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  29. ^ Wilson, Cameron (2 May 2012). "Guangzhou Evergrande sign Dortmund's Lucas Barrios for 8.5 million euro transfer fee". wildeastfootball.net. Archived from the original on 30 August 2012. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  30. ^ "Marcello Lippi appointed manager of Guangzhou Evergrande". TheGuardian.com. 17 May 2012. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  31. ^ "AFC Champions League 2012". Soccerway. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  32. ^ "Chinese FA Cup 2012". Soccerway. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  33. ^ "Cheng Zeng". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  34. ^ "Striker Elkeson makes Evergrande return". Reuters. 9 July 2019. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  35. ^ "Three-in-a-row for Guangzhou Evergrande". china.org.cn. 5 November 2013. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  36. ^ "Goal-kings Guangzhou end long drought". fifa.com. FIFA. 11 November 2013. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  37. ^ Kobo, Kingsley (14 December 2013). "Guangzhou Evergrande 2–0 Al Ahly: African champions stalled at Club World Cup". goal.com. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  38. ^ Davis, Steve (17 December 2013). "Bayern Munich has easy time in 3–0 win over Chinese side Guangzhou Evergrande at FIFA Club World Cup". NBC Sports. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  39. ^ "Ronaldinho scores then sent off as Mineiro finish third". Reuters. 21 December 2013. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  40. ^ "Guangzhou Evergrande win Chinese championship". Bangkok Post. 31 October 2015. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  41. ^ "Guangzhou Evergrande 1–0 Al Ahli: Southern China Tigers claim second continental crown". goal.com. 21 November 2015. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  42. ^ "Guangzhou Evergrande beat Club America, Sanfrecce Hiroshima win". ESPN. 13 December 2015. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  43. ^ "Barcelona beat Guangzhou Evergrande in Club World Cup as Luis Suarez stars". ESPN. 17 December 2015. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  44. ^ "Sanfrecce Hiroshima 2 Guangzhou Evergrande Taobao 1: Late Douglas double denies Scolari's men". fourfourtwo.com. 20 December 2015. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
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External linksEdit

Achievements
Preceded by
Ulsan Hyundai
 
Champions of Asia
2013
Succeeded by
Western Sydney Wanderers
 
Preceded by
Western Sydney Wanderers
 
Champions of Asia
2015
Succeeded by
Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors
 
Preceded by
Shandong Luneng Taishan
Champions of China
2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014 · 2015 · 2016 · 2017
2019
Succeeded by
Shanghai SIPG
Jiangsu Suning