Cabinet of Tihomir Orešković

The Thirteenth Government of the Republic of Croatia (Croatian: Trinaesta Vlada Republike Hrvatske) was the Croatian Government cabinet led by Prime Minister Tihomir Orešković. It was the government cabinet of Croatia between 22 January until 19 October 2016. It was formed following the 2015 election. The negotiation process leading to its formation was the longest in Croatian history, totaling at a record 76 days. On 16 June 2016, Orešković's government lost a motion of no confidence in the Parliament with 125 MPs voting for, 15 against and 2 abstaining. As a result, the Orešković cabinet served in an acting capacity until a new government took office after the 2016 election.

Orešković cabinet
Flag of Croatia.svg
13th Cabinet of the Republic of Croatia
2016
TihomirOreskovic.jpg
Date formed22 January 2016
Date dissolved19 October 2016
People and organisations
Head of stateKolinda Grabar-Kitarović
Head of governmentTihomir Orešković
Deputy head of governmentTomislav Karamarko (Jan–Jun 2016)
Božo Petrov (Jan–Oct 2016)
No. of ministers21 (on 19 October 2016)
Total no. of members24 (including former members)
Member partiesCroatian Democratic Union (HDZ)
Bridge of Independent Lists (MOST)
Status in legislatureMinority coalition government
Opposition partySocial Democratic Party
Opposition leaderZoran Milanović
History
Election(s)2015 election
Legislature term(s)2015–2016
PredecessorCabinet of Zoran Milanović
SuccessorCabinet of Andrej Plenković I

It was the first Croatian cabinet to be headed by a non-partisan Prime Minister, as well as having the largest number on non-partisan ministers (6). The remaining cabinet members came from two parties: the Croatian Democratic Union and Bridge of Independent Lists.

The Orešković cabinet was dubbed "Tim's Team" by the Croatian media.[1]

Motions of confidenceEdit

Vote on the confirmation of the 13th Government of the Republic of Croatia
Ballot 22 January 2016
Absentees
2 / 151
Required majority 76 Yes votes out of 151 votes
(Absolute majority of the total number of Members of Parliament)
Yes
83 / 151
 Y
No
61 / 151
Abstentions
5 / 151
Sources:[2]
Vote of no confidence in Prime Minister Tihomir Orešković
Ballot 16 June 2016
Absentees
9 / 151
Required majority 76 Yes votes, Abstentions or Absentees out of 151 votes
(Absolute majority of the total number of Members of Parliament)
Yes
125 / 151
 Y
No
15 / 151
Abstentions
2 / 151
Sources:[3]

HistoryEdit

The first change in the cabinet's make-up occurred just 6 days into its term when Minister of Veterans' Affairs Mijo Crnoja resigned on 28 January 2016 over a controversy involving him listing an abandoned wooden structure in Samobor as his place of residence while in reality living in Zagreb. He had done so in order to pay a lower surtax. After holding lengthy meetings behind closed doors during a period of several days, the Prime Minister and his two Deputies agreed to lend their support to Crnoja's case and his claimed innocence in the affair, however Crnoja himself tended his resignation stating that he did not wish to be a burden on the new government. He became the only member of Orešković's cabinet to have never attended a cabinet meeting and also made history as the shortest-ever serving member of a post-independence cabinet in Croatia.[4] After his resignation, Vesna Nađ, who had served as Deputy Minister of Veterans' Affairs in the Cabinet of Zoran Milanović, became interim minister, creating the situation where a member of the opposition centre-left Social Democratic Party held office in a government led by the centre-right.[5] Furthermore, the ministerial post remained vacant for almost two months due to the coalition parties failing to agree on a mutual candidate. At the end of a lengthy negotiation process they finally agreed on Tomo Medved of the HDZ as Crnoja's successor and the new minister.[citation needed]

The first 100 days the cabinet had been marked by constant disagreements and feuds within the ruling Patriotic Coalition-MOST coalition. Namely, many of the smaller parties of the Patriotic Coalition had expressed dissatisfaction with the ineffectiveness of the government, as well as the mutual blocking mechanism present between members of the Patriotic Coalition and MOST, and the increasing rivalry between the chairmen of these parties, Tomislav Karamarko and Božo Petrov. In this way MOST had been accused of presenting an ″opposition within the government″ and was seen as slow to make decisions on mutual proposals because of its inability to reach a consensus among its own members. The pace of promised reforms was also stained and slowed by the feud within the ruling coalition, as well as the Prime Minister's seemingly subordinate status and lack of political authority in comparison to Tomislav Karamarko and to a lesser extent Božo Petrov. In addition, the government had managed to present only a handful of bills to Parliament, due to an inability to reach the required quorum for three weeks, mostly owing to lack of accord between the coalition parties.[citation needed]

On 18 May 2016, the opposition Social Democratic Party initiated a motion of no confidence in Tomislav Karamarko after the Nacional weekly magazine published secret contracts revealing the business-related cooperation of his wife Ana Šarić and Josip Petrović, the special adviser and lobbyist of the MOL Group, a Hungarian oil corporation that gained control of Croatia's national oil company, INA, through a corruption scandal involving former Prime Minister Ivo Sanader in 2009. MOST leader and Deputy Prime Minister Božo Petrov stated on 26 May 2016 that his party would vote in favor of Karamarko's removal from office, thereby raising the possibility of the government falling and this resulting in early elections or the installment of a new parliamentary majority by the opposition. The motion of no confidence in Karamarko was scheduled to take place on June 16, but he instead chose to resign the day before it could occur, following the verdict of the Commission for the Prevention of Conflicts of Interest, which stipulated that Karamarko had indeed been in a conflict of interest when he had, during a meeting of the government cabinet, expressed the opinion that Croatia should exit an arbitration process with MOL. Instead, an HDZ-backed motion of no confidence in the very Prime Minister the party had installed with MOST was held on 16 June 2016, leading to the fall of the entire cabinet by a successful vote of 125 in favor, out of a total of 142 MPs taking part.[citation needed]

Status in the SaborEdit

The cabinet was a minority government for the entire duration of its term, with the two parties holding representation in the cabinet - the Croatian Democratic Union (HDZ) and Bridge of Independent Lists (Most) - together initially having 64 Members of Parliament (out of 151 in total) and thus being short of an overall majority of 76 MPs by 12 seats. The government thus relied on outside parliamentary support to achieve such a majority. It was provided primarily by the HDZ's junior partners in the Patriotic Coalition (HSP-AS, HSLS, HSS, HRAST, HDS and BUZ), but also by a number of independents, national minority Members of Parliament and those representing other smaller parties (HDSSB, BM 365 and NS-R).

Parliamentary seats held by parties in government only (22 January 2016):

50 14 87
Croatian Democratic Union Bridge of Independent Lists Non-cabinet parties and independent lists

Party breakdownEdit

Party breakdown of cabinet ministers:

12
7
2

List of MinistersEdit

Portfolio Minister Took office Left office Party
Prime Minister's Office
Prime Minister Tihomir Orešković 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 Independent
Ministers
Minister of Foreign and European Affairs Miro Kovač 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Social Politics and Youth Bernardica Juretić 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 Independent
Minister of Regional Development and EU funds Tomislav Tolušić 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of the Interior Vlaho Orepić 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 Independent
Minister of Finance Zdravko Marić 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 Independent
Minister of Defence Josip Buljević 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Health Dario Nakić 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Justice Ante Šprlje 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 Independent
Minister of Public Administration Dubravka Jurlina Alibegović 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 Independent
Minister of Economy Tomislav Panenić 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 MOST
Minister of Entrepreneurship and Crafts Darko Horvat 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Labour and Pension System Nada Šikić 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Maritime Affairs, Transport and Infrastructure Oleg Butković 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Science, Education and Sport Predrag Šustar 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Agriculture Davor Romić 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 Independent
Minister of Tourism Anton Kliman 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Environmental and Nature Protection Slaven Dobrović 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 MOST
Minister of Construction and Physical Planning Lovro Kuščević 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Veterans' Affairs Tomo Medved 21 March 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ
Minister of Culture Zlatko Hasanbegović 22 January 2016 19 October 2016 HDZ

Former membersEdit

Minister Party Portfolio Period Days in office
Mijo Crnoja HDZ Minister of Veterans' Affairs 22 January 2016 – 28 January 2016[4] 6
Tomislav Karamarko HDZ First Deputy Prime Minister 22 January 2016 – 15 June 2016 146
Božo Petrov Most Deputy Prime Minister of Croatia 22 January 2016 – 13 October 2016 265

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vijesti.hr (2016-01-21). "Orešković predstavio novu Vladu: 'Ovo je Tim's team! Zdravi miks starih i novih' — Vijesti.hr". Vijesti.rtl.hr. Retrieved 2016-04-29. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ https://net.hr/danas/hrvatska/blizi-se-potvrdivanje-vlade-zastupnicima-se-obraca-mandatar-oreskovic/
  3. ^ http://vijesti.hrt.hr/339565/sabor-o-opozivu-premijera-tihomira-oreskovica
  4. ^ a b "CRNOJA VIŠE NIJE MINISTAR 'Podnio sam ostavku, ne želim biti uteg Vladi' PREMIJER 'Ovo je prebitan resor, naći ćemo novog čovjeka uskoro'". Jutarnji list (in Croatian). 28 January 2016. Retrieved 29 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "'Ministarstvo branitelja sada je u rukama Vesne Nađ iz SDP-a' | 24sata". 24sata.hr. 2016-01-28. Retrieved 2016-04-29. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External linksEdit