The 20s decade ran from January 1, AD 20, to December 31, AD 29.

Millennium: 1st millennium
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In Europe, the 20s saw revolts by the Aedui, Thracian tribesmen, and the Frisians against the Roman Empire. In north Africa, Tacfarinas, a Numidian Berber deserter, led the Musulamii tribe and a loose and changing coalition of other Berber tribes in revolt, before being defeated in AD 24. In China, the Xin dynasty collapsed and the Eastern Han dynasty was established. In Korea, Daemusin of Goguryeo annexed Dongbuyeo and killed its king Daeso.

In science, the 20s saw the manufacture of pens and metal writing tools in Rome. Major disasters of this decade include a fire in Rome, and the collapse of a poorly built amphitheatre in Fidenae, which killed 20,000 of the 50,000 spectators. In 27, Christianity was born as a Jewish sect in Jerusalem. Geographica, an encyclopedia of geographical knowledge created by Strabo, was finished no later than AD 23.

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  • First year of the Dihuang Era, of the Chinese Xin Dynasty.

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Arts and sciencesEdit
  • The manufacture of pens and metal writing tools begins in Rome.

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  • Liu Xuan, a descendant of the Han Dynasty royal family and leader of insurgents against the Xin Dynasty, proclaims himself emperor against Wang Mang.[5]
  • July – After being under siege for two months, about 19,000 insurgents under Liu Xiu defeat 450,000 of Wang Mang's troops in the Battle of Kunyang, ushering in the fall of Wang Mang's Xin Dynasty and restoration of the Han Dynasty.[6]
  • October 6 — Emperor Liu Xuan's forces kill Wang Mang at the end of a three-day siege.

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AD 22

AD 23

AD 25

AD 27

AD 28


DeathsEdit

AD 20

AD 21

AD 22

AD 23

AD 24

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AD 26

AD 27

AD 28

AD 29

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Williams, Rose (2013). Caesar's Blood: Greek Tragedy in Roman Life. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. p. 72. ISBN 978-1-61041-102-8.
  2. ^ Roller, Duane W. (1998). The building program of Herod the Great. University of California Press. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-520-20934-3.
  3. ^ Bunson, Matthew (2002). Encyclopedia of the Roman empire (2nd ed.). Infobase Publishing. pp. 187–188. ISBN 978-0-8160-4562-4.
  4. ^ Adkins, Lesley; Adkins, Roy A. (2004). Handbook to life in ancient Rome (2nd ed.). Infobase Publishing. p. 23. ISBN 978-0-8160-5026-0.
  5. ^ Giele, Enno (2006). Imperial decision-making and communication in early China: a study of Cai Yong's Duduan. Otto Harrassowitz Verlag. p. 218. ISBN 978-3-447-05334-1.
  6. ^ Schram, Stuart R. (1992). Mao's road to power: revolutionary writings 1912–1949. 1. M.E. Sharpe. p. 366. ISBN 978-1-56324-457-5.
  7. ^ a b "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  8. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 4.46-4.51
  9. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 4.64
  10. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 4.63
  11. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 4.73
  12. ^ a b "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  13. ^ a b Colin Humphreys, The Mystery of the Last Supper Cambridge University Press 2011 ISBN 978-0-521-73200-0, page 65
  14. ^ "Chronology of the Life of Jesus Christ". Catholic Encyclopedia.
  15. ^ Perry, Curtis (2008). Eros and Power in English Renaissance Drama: Five Plays by Marlowe, Davenant, Massinger, Ford and Shakespeare. McFarland. p. 315. ISBN 978-0-7864-3165-6.
  16. ^ Healy, John F. (1999). Pliny the Elder on science and technology. Oxford University Press. p. 1. ISBN 978-0-19-814687-2.
  17. ^ Bunson, Matthew (1995). A Dictionary of the Roman Empire. OUP USA. p. 71. ISBN 978-0-19-510233-8.
  18. ^ Lightman, Marjorie; Lightman, Benjamin (2008). A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women. Infobase Publishing. p. 178. ISBN 978-1-4381-0794-3.
  19. ^ Bowman, Alan K.; Champlin, Edward; Lintott, Andrew (1996). The Augustan Empire, 43 B.C.–A.D. 69 (2nd ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 213. ISBN 978-0-521-26430-3.
  20. ^ Clark, Anthony E. (2008). Ban Gu's history of early China. Cambria Press. p. 110. ISBN 978-1-60497-561-1.
  21. ^ Rocca, Samuel (2008). Herod's Judaea: a Mediterranean state in the classical world. Mohr Siebeck. p. 58. ISBN 978-3-16-149717-9.
  22. ^ Yunis, Harvey (2003). Written texts and the rise of literate culture in ancient Greece. Cambridge University Press. p. 125. ISBN 978-0-521-80930-6.