Junia Tertia

Junia Tertia, also called Tertulla, (c. 75 BC – 22 AD) was the third daughter of Servilia and her second husband Decimus Junius Silanus, and later the wife of Gaius Cassius Longinus.

Junia Tertia
Born
Died
Known forDaughter of Servilia, sister of Brutus
Spouse(s)Gaius Cassius Longinus
ChildrenGaius Cassius Longinus (possibly)
Parents

BiographyEdit

Early lifeEdit

Through her mother she was the younger half-sister of Marcus Junius Brutus,[1] she also had two older sister Junia Prima and Junia Secunda as well as an older brother named Marcus Junius Silanus.

In 47 BC it was rumored that her mother Servilia had pimped her out to Julius Caesar, although it was also rumored that she was the daughter of Caesar, of whom her mother was the mistress of.[2]

Marriage and later lifeEdit

Tertia married Gaius Cassius Longinus, they had one son, who was born in about 59-60 BC.[3] She had a miscarriage in 44 BC.[4]

Like her mother, Tertia was allowed to outlive her husband Cassius, unmolested by the triumvirs and Augustus. She survived to an advanced age, dying in 22 AD, 64 years after the battle at Philippi,[5] during the reign of the emperor Tiberius. She had amassed a great estate in her long widowhood, and left her fortune to many prominent Romans, although excluded the emperor, which was met with criticism. Tiberius forgave the omission and still allowed a large funeral to be held in her honor, though the masks of Brutus and Cassius were to not be displayed in the procession.[5]

Through her son she may have ended up as an ancestress to the empress Domitia Longina.[6]

Family treeEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Woodman, Anthony (2004). The Annals By Cornelius Tacitus. Hackett Publishing. p. 121. ISBN 978-0-87220-558-1.
  2. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Julius Caesar 50
  3. ^ Plutarch, Brutus, 14.4
  4. ^ Dr Kirsty Corrigan; Brutus: Caesar's Assassin - page: 10
  5. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals III.76
  6. ^ Chausson, François (2003). "Domitia Longina : Reconsidération d'un destin impérial". Journal des Savants. 1: 101–129. doi:10.3406/jds.2003.1663.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit