2020 New Hampshire Democratic primary

The 2020 New Hampshire Democratic primary took place in New Hampshire, United States, on February 11, 2020, as the second nominating contest in the Democratic Party primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the Iowa caucuses the week before. The New Hampshire primary is a semi-closed primary, meaning that only Democrats and independents may vote in this primary. New Hampshire sends 33 delegates to the national convention, of which 24 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary, and the other 9 are unpledged delegates (superdelegates) preselected independently of the primary results.[1]

2020 New Hampshire Democratic primary

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33 Democratic National Convention delegates (24 pledged, 9 unpledged)
The number of pledged delegates received is determined by the popular vote
  Bernie Sanders March 2020 (cropped).jpg Pete Buttigieg by Gage Skidmore 2 (cropped).jpg Amy Klobuchar by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Candidate Bernie Sanders Pete Buttigieg Amy Klobuchar
Home state Vermont Indiana Minnesota
Delegate count 9 9 6
Popular vote 76,352 72,443 58,774
Percentage 25.6% 24.3% 19.7%

  Elizabeth Warren by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg Joe Biden February 2020 crop.jpg
Candidate Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden
Home state Massachusetts Delaware
Delegate count 0 0
Popular vote 27,427 24,911
Percentage 9.2% 8.4%

New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary election results by county, 2020.svg
New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary election results by town, 2020.svg
New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary election results by congressional district, 2020.svg
  Bernie Sanders
  Pete Buttigieg
  Amy Klobuchar
  Michael Bloomberg (write-in)
  Tie
  N/A

Senator Bernie Sanders won the primary with 25.6% of the vote, edging out former mayor Pete Buttigieg, who came in second place with 24.3% of the vote.[2] Both Sanders and Buttigieg received nine delegates, while senator Amy Klobuchar unexpectedly finished in third place and received six delegates; her third-place finish has been described as "Klomentum" or “Klobucharge” by several observers. Senator Elizabeth Warren and former vice president Joe Biden both underperformed expectations, coming in fourth and fifth, respectively, and received no delegates. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang, senator Michael Bennet, and former governor Deval Patrick all suspended their presidential campaigns after their poor results in New Hampshire.

Voter turnout set a new record for New Hampshire primaries, with 300,742 ballots being cast,[3] breaking the previous record of 287,527 set in the 2008 primary.[4]

ProcedureEdit

The state's ballot access laws have traditionally been lenient, with prospective presidential candidates required to pay only a $1,000 fee to secure a line on the primary ballot.[5]

Primary elections were held on Tuesday, February 11, 2020. The first polls opened at midnight local time (EST),[6] with the vast majority of polling places closed by 7 p.m. and a small number of cities allowed to close at 8 p.m.[1]

In the semi-closed primary, candidates must meet a viability threshold of 15 percent at the congressional district or statewide level in order to be considered viable. The 24 pledged delegates to the 2020 Democratic National Convention are all allocated proportionally on the basis of the qualified results of the primary, which however is detetermined by each of the three sub-result categories (congressional district 1, congressional district 2 and statewide total). Of the 24 pledged national convention delegates, 8 each are allocated to each of the state's 2 congressional districts and another 3 are allocated to party leaders and elected officials (PLEO delegates), in addition to 5 at-large pledged delegates.[1] The national convention delegation meeting will subsequently be held in Concord on April 25, to vote and elect the exact names of the five pledged at-large and three pledged PLEO delegates to send to the Democratic National Convention (all pledged to support presidential candidates based on the proportional statewide qualified popular vote result of the primary on February 11).[1]

The 24 pledged delegates New Hampshire sends to the national convention as per the results of the primary on February 11, will be joined by 9 pre-determined New Hampshire PLEO unpledged delegates (also known as superdelegates): 5 members of the Democratic National Committee and 4 members of Congress (of which 2 are Senators and 2 are U.S. Representatives).[1]

Pledged national
convention
delegates[1]
Type Del.
CD1[a] 8
CD2[b] 8
PLEO[c] 3
At-large[d] 5
Total pledged delegates 24

Candidates on the ballotEdit

The following candidates were on the ballot[7] and are listed in order of filing.

Forums and other eventsEdit

Prospective candidates began making visits to New Hampshire in 2017.[8]

Among the more notable events of the campaign was the 2019 state convention, at which 19 of the candidates give speeches.[9]

The eighth Democratic primary debate took place in the state on February 7, 2020.[10]

A Lesser-Known Candidates Forum was also held, featuring candidates on the New Hampshire ballot but who were not considered major candidates.[11]

PollingEdit

Polling aggregation
Source of poll aggregation Date
updated
Dates
polled
Bernie
Sanders
Pete
Buttigieg
Elizabeth
Warren
Joe
Biden
Amy
Klobuchar
Andrew
Yang
Tulsi
Gabbard
Tom
Steyer
Other Un-
decided[e]
270 to Win Feb 10, 2020 Feb 4–9, 2020 27.3% 20.9% 13.1% 12.3% 10.3% 3.0% 2.7% 2.1% 1.9%[f] 6.4%
RealClear Politics Feb 10, 2020 Feb 6–9, 2020 28.7% 21.3% 11.0% 11.0% 11.7% 3.7% 3.3% 1.7% 1.3%[g] 6.3%
FiveThirtyEight Feb 10, 2020 until Feb 10, 2020[h] 26.0% 21.6% 12.5% 11.7% 10.3% 3.0% 2.9% 2.6% 3.5%[i] 5.8%
Average 27.3% 21.3% 12.2% 11.7% 10.8% 3.2% 3.0% 2.1% 2.2%[j] 6.2%
New Hampshire primary results (February 11, 2020) 25.6% 24.3% 9.2% 8.4% 19.7% 2.8% 3.3% 3.6% 2.7%[k]
   – Debate qualifying poll as designated by the Democratic National Committee
Polling from January 1, 2020, to February 11, 2020
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[l]
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Pete
Buttigieg
Tulsi
Gabbard
Amy
Klobuchar
Bernie
Sanders
Tom
Steyer
Elizabeth
Warren
Andrew
Yang
Other Undecided
New Hampshire primary (popular vote) Feb 11, 2020 8.4% 24.3% 3.3% 19.7% 25.6% 3.6% 9.2% 2.8% 2.7%[m]
AtlasIntel Feb 8–10, 2020 431 (LV) ± 5.0% 12% 24% 3% 14% 24% 1% 11% 5% 6%
Data For Progress[n] Feb 7–10, 2020 1296 (LV) ± 2.7% 9% 26% 3% 13% 28% 3% 14% 5%
American Research Group Feb 8–9, 2020 400 (LV) 13% 20% 3% 13% 28% 2% 11% 3% 5%[o] 2%
Emerson College/WHDH Feb 8–9, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.3% 10% 23% 2% 14% 30% 2% 11% 4% 4%[p]
Change Research Feb 8–9, 2020 662 (LV) ± 3.8% 9% 21% 6% 8% 30% 3% 8% 5% 1%[q] 9%
Suffolk University/Boston Globe/WBZ-TV Feb 8–9, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 12% 19% 3% 14% 27% 2% 12% 3% 3%[r] 7%
Elucd Feb 7–9, 2020 492 (LV) ± 4.4% 8% 20% [s] 12% 26% [t] 10% [u] [v] 15%
University of New Hampshire/CNN Feb 6–9, 2020 365 (LV) ± 5.1% 11% 22% 5% 7% 29% 1% 10% 4% 1%[w] 10%
Emerson College/WHDH Feb 7–8, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.3% 11% 20% 3% 13% 30% 2% 12% 4% 4%[x]
Suffolk University/Boston Globe/WBZ-TV Feb 7–8, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 10% 22% 2% 9% 24% 2% 13% 3% 3%[y] 12%
Boston Herald-FPU-NBC10 Feb 5–8, 2020 512 (LV) 14% 20% 0% 6% 23% 2% 16% 3% 3%[z] 13%
YouGov/CBS News Feb 5–8, 2020 848 (LV) ± 4.3% 12% 25% 2% 10% 29% 1% 17% 1% 3%[aa]
University of New Hampshire/CNN Feb 5–8, 2020 384 (LV) ± 5.0% 12% 21% 5% 6% 28% 2% 9% 4% 2%[ab] 11%
Emerson College/WHDH Feb 6–7, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.3% 11% 24% 5% 9% 31% 2% 11% 3% 3%[ac]
Suffolk University/Boston Globe/WBZ-TV Feb 6–7, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 11% 25% 2% 6% 24% 2% 14% 3% 4%[ad] 9%
University of Massachusetts Lowell Feb 4–7, 2020 440 (LV) ± 6.5% 14% 17% 4% 8% 25% 5% 15% 3% 5%[ae] 4%
University of New Hampshire/CNN Feb 4–7, 2020 365 (LV) ± 5.1% 11% 21% 6% 5% 28% 3% 9% 3% 3%[af] 11%
Emerson College/WHDH Feb 5–6, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.3% 11% 23% 6% 9% 32% 2% 13% 2% 3%[ag]
Suffolk University/Boston Globe/WBZ-TV Feb 5–6, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 11% 23% 4% 6% 24% 3% 13% 3% 4%[ah] 12%
Marist/NBC News Feb 4–6, 2020 709 (LV) ± 4.7% 13% 21% 3% 8% 25% 4% 14% 4% 3%[ai] 5%
Suffolk University/Boston Globe/WBZ-TV Feb 4–5, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 12% 19% 5% 6% 25% 4% 11% 2% 1%[aj] 15%
Monmouth University Feb 3–5, 2020 503 (LV) ± 4.4% 17% 20% 4% 9% 24% 3% 13% 4% 2%[ak] 5%
17%[al] 22% 13% 27% 13% 3%[am] 4%
19%[an] 28% 28% 16% 3%[ao] 5%
Emerson College/WHDH Feb 3–5, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.3% 12% 21% 5% 11% 31% 1% 12% 4% 2%[ap]
Suffolk University/Boston Globe/WBZ-TV Feb 3–4, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 15% 15% 5% 6% 24% 5% 10% 3% 1%[aq] 14%
Emerson College/WHDH Feb 2–4, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.3% 13% 17% 6% 11% 32% 2% 11% 6% 3%[ar]
Feb 3, 2020 Iowa caucuses
Suffolk University/Boston Globe/WBZ-TV Feb 2–3, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 18% 11% 5% 6% 24% 4% 13% 3% 3%[as] 14%
Emerson College/WHDH Feb 1–3, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.3% 13% 12% 4% 12% 32% 5% 13% 5% 4%[at]
Emerson College/WHDH Jan 31 – Feb 2, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.3% 14% 13% 7% 8% 29% 8% 12% 7% 2%[au]
Saint Anselm College Jan 29 – Feb 2, 2020 491 (LV) ± 4.4% 19% 14% 3% 11% 19% 5% 11% 4% 2%[av] 11%
Boston Herald-FPU-NBC10[1] Jan 29 – Feb 1, 2020 454 (LV) ± 4.6% 24% 8% 3% 4% 31% No voters 17% 1% 5%[aw] 7%
University of Massachusetts Lowell Jan 28–31, 2020 400 (LV) ± 6.4% 22% 12% 5% 6% 23% 6% 19% 2% 1%[ax] 4%
YouGov/UMass Amherst/WCVB Jan 17–29, 2020 500 (LV) ± 5.3% 20% 12% 5% 5% 25% 5% 17% 4% 2%[ay] 3%
American Research Group Jan 24–27, 2020 600 (LV) ± 4% 13% 12% 8% 7% 28% 2% 11% 5% 8%[az] 6%
Boston Herald-FPU-NBC10 Jan 23–26, 2020 407 (LV) ± 4.9% 22% 10% 3% 5% 29% 0% 16% 1% 7%[ba] 9%
Marist/NBC News Jan 20–23, 2020 697 (LV) ± 4.5% 15% 17% 6% 10% 22% 3% 13% 5% 2%[bb] 7%
University of New Hampshire/CNN Jan 15–23, 2020 516 (LV) ± 4.3% 16% 15% 5% 6% 25% 2% 12% 5% 2%[bc] 10%
MassINC Polling Group/WBUR Jan 17–21, 2020 426 (LV) ± 4.8% 14% 17% 5% 6% 29% 2% 13% 5% 4%[bd] 5%[be]
Suffolk University/Boston Globe Jan 15–19, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 15% 12% 5% 5% 16% 3% 10% 6% 3%[bf] 24%
Emerson College/WHDH Jan 13–16, 2020 657 (LV) ± 3.8% 14% 18% 5% 10% 23% 4% 14% 6% 7%[bg]
Jan 13, 2020 Booker withdraws from the race
Boston Herald-FPU-NBC10 Jan 8–12, 2020 434 (LV) 26% 7% 4% 2% 22% 2% 18% 2% 7%[bh] 12%
Patinkin Research Strategies/Yang 2020[bi] Jan 5–7, 2020 600 (LV) ± 4% 21% 17% 7% 6% 19% 6% 10% 5% 3%[bj] 7%
Monmouth University Jan 3–7, 2020 404 (LV) ± 4.9% 19% 20% 4% 6% 18% 4% 15% 3% 3%[bk] 7%
21%[bl] 20% 7% 21% 15% 5% 5%[bm] 8%
24%[bn] 23% 21% 18% 5%[bo] 8%
YouGov/CBS News Dec 27, 2019 –
Jan 3, 2020
487 (LV) ± 5.3% 25% 13% 1% 7% 27% 3% 18% 2% 3%[bp]
Polling before January 2020
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[l]
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Cory
Booker
Pete
Buttigieg
Tulsi
Gabbard
Kamala
Harris
Amy
Klobuchar
Beto
O'Rourke
Deval
Patrick
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Andrew
Yang
Other Undecided
MassINC Polling Group/WBUR Dec 3–8, 2019 442 (LV) ± 4.7% 17% 1% 18% 5% 3% <1% 15% 12% 5% 11%[bq] 12%[br]
Dec 3, 2019 Harris withdraws from the race
Emerson College Nov 22–26, 2019 549 (LV) ± 4.1% 14% 2% 22% 6% 4% 2% 0% 26% 14% 5% 7%[bs]
Boston Globe/Suffolk University Nov 21–24, 2019 500 (LV) 12% 2% 13% 6% 3% 1% 1% 16% 14% 4% 6%[bt] 21%
Saint Anselm College Nov 13–18, 2019 255 (RV) ± 6.1% 15% 3% 25% 3% 1% 6% 0% 9% 15% 2% 5%[bu] 13%
Nov 14, 2019 Patrick announces his candidacy
YouGov/CBS News Nov 6–13, 2019 535 (RV) ± 5% 22% 1% 16% 0% 3% 3% 20% 31% 1% 1%[bv]
Quinnipiac University Nov 6–10, 2019 1,134 (LV) ± 3.8 20% 1% 15% 6% 1% 3% 14% 16% 4% 5%[bw] 14%
Nov 1, 2019 O'Rourke withdraws from the race
University of New Hampshire/CNN Oct 21–27, 2019 574 (LV) ± 4.1% 15% 2% 10% 5% 3% 5% 2% 21% 18% 5% 4%[bx] 10%
Boston Herald/FPU Oct 9–13, 2019 422 (LV) ± 4.8% 24% 2% 9% 1% 4% 2% 0% 22% 25% 1% 4%[by] 7%
Firehouse Strategies/Øptimus Oct 8–10, 2019 610 (LV) ± 3.7% 18% 2% 7% [bz] 2% [bz] 1% 9% 25% 2% 32% [bz]
YouGov/CBS News Oct 3–11, 2019 506 ± 5.4% 24% 1% 7% 2% 4% 2% 1% 17% 32% 5% 5%[ca]
Saint Anselm College Sep 25–29, 2019 423 ± 4.8% 24% 1% 10% 3% 5% 3% <1% 11% 25% 2% 3%[cb] 9%
Monmouth University Sep 17–21, 2019 401 ± 4.9% 25% 2% 10% 2% 3% 2% 1% 12% 27% 2% 3%[cc] 9%
HarrisX/No Labels Sep 6–11, 2019 595 ± 4.0% 22% 3% 5% 6% 5% 1% 1% 21% 15% 2% 5%[cd] 14%
Boston Herald/FPU Sep 4–10, 2019 425 ± 4.8% 21% 1% 5% 3% 6% 1% 2% 29% 17% 5% 2%[ce] 9%
Emerson College Sep 6–9, 2019 483 ± 4.4% 24% 4% 11% 6% 8% 1% 1% 13% 21% 3% 7%[cf]
YouGov/CBS News Aug 28 – Sep 4, 2019 526 ± 5.2% 26% 2% 8% 1% 7% 1% 1% 25% 27% 1% 1%[cg]
Gravis Marketing Aug 2–6, 2019 250 ± 6.2% 15% 0% 8% 5% 7% 4% 2% 21% 12% 4% 8%[ch] 11%
Suffolk University Aug 1–4, 2019 500 ± 4.4% 21% 1% 6% 3% 8% 1% 0% 17% 14% 1% 6%[ci] 21%
Firehouse Strategies/Øptimus Jul 23–25, 2019 587 ± 3.3% 21% 1% 8% 13% 0% 13% 16% 1% 7% 19%
YouGov/CBS News Jul 9–18, 2019 530 ± 5% 27% 1% 7% 2% 12% 1% 2% 20% 18% 1% 5%[cj]
University of New Hampshire/CNN Jul 8–15, 2019 386 ± 5.0% 24% 2% 10% 1% 9% 0% 2% 19% 19% 1% 4%[ck] 9%
Saint Anselm College Jul 10–12, 2019 351 ± 5.2% 21% 1% 12% 1% 18% 3% 0% 10% 17% 5% 3%[cl] 11%
Change Research Jul 6–9, 2019 1,084 ± 3.0% 19% 1% 13% 3% 15% 1% 1% 20% 22% 1% 3%[cm]
Change Research Jun 29 – Jul 4, 2019 420 13% 2% 14% 2% 13% 1% 2% 26% 24% 2% 4%[cn]
Change Research Jun 17–20, 2019 308 24% 0% 14% 1% 3% 1% 4% 28% 21% 1% 3%[co]
YouGov/CBS News May 31 – Jun 12, 2019 502 ± 4.9% 33% 3% 10% 0% 7% 1% 4% 20% 17% 1% 2%[cp]
Tel Opinion Research* May 20–22, 2019 600 ± 4.0% 33% 7% 7% 1% 12% 11% 28%
Monmouth University May 2–7, 2019 376 ± 5.1% 36% 2% 9% 0% 6% 2% 2% 18% 8% 1% 2%[cq] 11%
Change Research May 3–5, 2019 864 ± 3.3% 26% 2% 12% 1% 8% 1% 3% 30% 9% 2% 4%[cr]
Firehouse Strategies/Øptimus Apr 30 – May 2, 2019 551 ± 4.0% 34% 1% 10% 7% 1% 3% 16% 9% 19%
Suffolk University Apr 25–28, 2019 429 ± 4.7% 20% 3% 12% 1% 6% 1% 3% 12% 8% 1% 4%[cs] 27%
Apr 25, 2019 Biden announces his candidacy
University of New Hampshire Apr 10–18, 2019 241 ± 6.3% 18% 3% 15% 1% 4% 2% 3% 30% 5% 2% 5%[ct] 12%
Apr 14, 2019 Buttigieg announces his candidacy
Saint Anselm College Apr 3–8, 2019 326 ± 5.4% 23% 4% 11% 1% 7% 2% 6% 16% 9% 9%[cu] 13%
Mar 14, 2019 O'Rourke announces his candidacy
University of New Hampshire Feb 18–26, 2019 240 ± 6.3% 22% 3% 1% 1% 10% 4% 5% 26% 7% 6%[cv] 14%
Emerson College Feb 21–22, 2019 405 ± 4.8% 25% 5% 1% 12% 8% 5% 27% 9% 10%[cw]
Feb 19, 2019 Sanders announces his candidacy
YouGov/UMass Amherst Feb 7–15, 2019 337 ± 6.4% 28% 3% 14% 1% 6% 20% 9% 9%[cx] 9%
Feb 10, 2019 Klobuchar announces her candidacy
Feb 9, 2019 Warren announces her candidacy
Firehouse Strategies/Øptimus Jan 31 – Feb 2, 2019 518 ± 4.1% 22% 4% 13% 2% 2% 13% 9% 0%[cy] 35%
Feb 1, 2019 Booker announces his candidacy
Jan 21, 2019 Harris announces her candidacy
Jan 11, 2019 Gabbard announces her candidacy
Change Research Jan 2–3, 2019 1,162 24% 3% 4% 2% 9% 26% 11% 22%[cz]
University of New Hampshire Aug 2–19, 2018 198 ± 7.0% 19% 6% 3% 30% 17% 12%[da] 12%
Suffolk University Apr 26–30, 2018 295 ± 5.7% 20% 8% 4% 4% 13% 26% 4%[db] 18%
30% 10% 6% 8% 25% 6%[dc] 12%
University of New Hampshire Apr 13–22, 2018 188 ± 7.1% 26% 5% 6% 1% 28% 11% 9%[dd] 13%
University of New Hampshire Jan 28 – Feb 10, 2018 219 ± 6.6% 35% 3% 1% 0% 24% 15% 7%[de] 15%
Nov 6, 2017 Yang announces his candidacy
University of New Hampshire Oct 3–15, 2017 212 ± 6.7% 24% 6% 1% 1% 31% 13% 14%[df] 11%
Head-to-head polls
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Pete
Buttigieg
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided
Tel Opinion Research May 20–22, 2019 600 ± 4.0% 63% 21% 15%
66% 22% 13%
58% 29% 13%
American Research Group Mar 21–27, 2018 400 ± 5.0% 47% 45% 7%
58% 33% 8%

ResultsEdit

Popular vote share by county
  Sanders—30–40%
  Sanders—<30%
  Buttigieg—<30%
Popular vote share by congressional district
  Sanders—25–30%

The first results in New Hampshire were released shortly after midnight from Dixville Notch. Although not on the ballot, Michael Bloomberg received three write-in votes, enough to carry the town.[12][13][14]

Bernie Sanders won the state by a margin of around four thousand votes over Pete Buttigieg, with Amy Klobuchar placing third.[15][2] Sanders and Buttigieg each received nine pledged national convention delegates while Klobuchar received six.[16][1] Sanders had previously won the state in his prior pursuit of the Democratic nomination in 2016 with some 152,000 votes (60.4% of the total) against Hillary Clinton.[17]

Voter turnout set a new record for New Hampshire primaries with 300,742 ballots being cast,[3] breaking the previous record of 287,527 set in the 2008 primary.[18][19]


2020 New Hampshire Democratic primary[2][20]
Candidate Votes % Delegates[dg]
Bernie Sanders 76,355 25.6 9
Pete Buttigieg 72,445 24.3 9
Amy Klobuchar 58,774 19.7 6
Elizabeth Warren 27,428 9.2 0
Joe Biden 24,911 8.3 0
Tom Steyer 10,694 3.6 0
Tulsi Gabbard 9,745 3.3 0
Andrew Yang 8,312 2.8 0
Michael Bloomberg (write-in)[21][20] 4,777 1.6 0
Deval Patrick 1,266 0.4 0
Donald Trump (write-in Republican)[20] 1,219 0.4 0
Michael Bennet 984 0.3 0
Joe Sestak (withdrawn) 190 0.1 0
Other write-ins[dh] 173 0.1 0
Cory Booker (withdrawn) 156 0.1 0
Kamala Harris (withdrawn) 129 0.0 0
Marianne Williamson (withdrawn) 99 0.0 0
Steve Burke 86 0.0 0
Julián Castro (withdrawn) 83 0.0 0
John Delaney (withdrawn) 83 0.0 0
Tom Koos 72 0.0 0
Steve Bullock (withdrawn) 64 0.0 0
Michael A. Ellinger 57 0.0 0
David John Thistle 53 0.0 0
Lorenz Kraus 52 0.0 0
Robby Wells 45 0.0 0
Henry Hewes 43 0.0 0
Sam Sloan 34 0.0 0
Mosie Boyd 33 0.0 0
Mark Stewart Greenstein 31 0.0 0
Ben Gleib (withdrawn) 30 0.0 0
Thomas James Torgesen 30 0.0 0
Rita Krichevsky 23 0.0 0
Bill Weld (write-in Republican)[20] 16 0.0 0
Jason Evritte Dunlap 12 0.0 0
Roque De La Fuente III 11 0.0 0
Raymond Michael Moroz 8 0.0 0
Total 298,523 100% 24


Results by countyEdit

2020 New Hampshire Democratic primary
(results per county)[2][20]
Candidate Belknap
votes
Carroll
votes
Cheshire
votes
Coös
votes
Grafton
votes
Hillsborough
votes
Merrimack
votes
Rockingham
votes
Strafford
votes
Sullivan
votes
State-wide
votes
Bernie Sanders 2,670 2,605 5,973 1,562 6,580 21,659 8,636 15,331 8,916 2,420 76,352
Pete Buttigieg 2,798 2,813 4,053 1,094 5,799 20,539 8,466 17,929 6,764 2,188 72,443
Amy Klobuchar 2,383 2,464 3,616 937 4,280 16,701 7,853 13,736 5,178 1,626 58,774
Elizabeth Warren 839 903 1,816 395 3,298 7,266 3,177 5,928 2,967 838 27,427
Joe Biden 1,122 1,020 1,265 566 1,657 7,375 2,863 6,069 2,250 724 24,911
Tom Steyer 488 322 651 226 550 3,165 1,294 2,659 1,075 264 10,694
Tulsi Gabbard 406 403 587 206 559 3,058 1,163 2,163 887 313 9,745
Andrew Yang 248 229 597 146 873 2,386 905 1,736 954 238 8,312
Total Write-ins[di] 304 303 304 193 510 1,502 690 1,430 523 221 5,980
Deval Patrick 35 43 55 17 87 393 159 318 128 23 1,258
Michael Bennet 29 31 44 7 90 306 182 176 84 35 984
Joe Sestak (withdrawn) 5 5 9 10 6 43 79 14 13 6 190
Cory Booker (withdrawn) 8 13 6 4 12 37 18 44 11 3 156
Kamala Harris (withdrawn) 6 8 10 3 7 47 8 28 11 128
Marianne Williamson (withdrawn) 2 6 7 9 5 29 5 29 5 2 99
Steve Burke 2 1 9 5 6 21 6 24 6 6 86
Julián Castro (withdrawn) 2 3 8 1 2 30 7 25 4 1 83
John Delaney (withdrawn) 1 2 3 3 4 24 14 15 16 1 83
Tom Koos 3 1 4 5 3 22 7 13 10 4 72
Steve Bullock (withdrawn) 2 1 4 1 7 20 12 11 4 2 64
Michael A. Ellinger 38 3 3 5 4 3 1 57
David John Thistle 1 5 4 7 20 3 7 5 1 53
Lorenz Kraus 3 2 1 41 1 4 52
Robby Wells 1 1 2 18 7 12 3 1 45
Henry Hewes 2 2 6 2 7 3 15 2 3 42
Sam Sloan 2 1 1 14 8 5 2 1 34
Mosie Boyd 2 2 2 1 1 5 5 13 2 33
Mark Stewart Greenstein 4 1 12 2 6 6 31
Ben Gleib (withdrawn) 1 4 7 5 8 3 2 30
Thomas James Torgeson 1 1 4 2 3 5 3 8 2 1 30
Rita Krichevsky 4 1 1 13 1 2 1 23
Jason Evritte Dunlap 1 1 3 1 2 4 12
Roque De La Fuente III 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 11
Raymond Michael Moroz 1 5 2 8
Total 11,408 11,186 19,052 5,407 24,362 84,780 35,578 67,764 29,840 8,925 298,302

AnalysisEdit

Bernie Sanders narrowly won the New Hampshire primary with 25.6% of the vote, the lowest vote share a winner of this primary has ever received,[22] with Pete Buttigieg finishing in second.[2] Although Sanders' victory was in line with what most New Hampshire polls had been predicting for weeks, his margin of victory was only slightly over a percentage point and the race was closer than expected. By contrast, Amy Klobuchar finished in an unexpectedly strong third place. Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden finished in fourth and fifth place, respectively, both of which were considered disappointing finishes.[23] Geographically, Sanders won the largest cities in New Hampshire, including Manchester, Nashua, and Concord. Buttigieg kept the race close by performing strongly in the southeastern part of the state,[23] including in the suburbs of Boston and in the nearby, more rural Lakes Region.[24]

Exit polls showed that Sanders benefited from his strong performance among young voters as he won about half of the under-30 vote, with this group making up about 14% of the electorate. Among those under the age of 45, he won 42% of the vote; this larger group made up about a third of the electorate. Buttigieg received only 21% of the vote among those under the age of 45, but outperformed Sanders 26–17 among voters 45 and older. Both Sanders and Buttigieg lost the 45-and-older vote to Klobuchar, who received 27% of the vote in this group. Similarly, Klobuchar convincingly won among voters aged 65 and older, receiving 32% of their votes, as compared to only 14% for Sanders and 12% for Biden. Ideologically, about 60% of voters identified as either "very liberal" or "somewhat liberal", and Sanders won this group with about 33% of the vote. By contrast, among the remaining 40% of voters who identified as "moderate" or "conservative", Buttigieg and Klobuchar approximately tied with 27 and 26% of the vote, respectively.[25]

AftermathEdit

Following poor showings in the New Hampshire primary, Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado,[26] entrepreneur Andrew Yang[27] and former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick[28] withdrew from the race.

With the end of these campaigns, the Democratic field numbered less than ten candidates for the first time since early 2019.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Each 1st congressional district (CD1) delegate is pledged to support a specific presidential candidate as determined per the total qualified popular vote result of the primary held only in CD1 on February 11.
  2. ^ Each 2nd congressional district (CD2) delegate is pledged to support a specific presidential candidate as determined per the total qualified popular vote result of the primary held only in CD2 on February 11.
  3. ^ Each PLEO delegate is pledged to support a specific presidential candidate as determined per the statewide qualified popular vote result of the primary held on February 11, but the exact name of the PLEO delegate will only be elected among the participating PLEO delegates at the "New Hampshire national convention delegation meeting" on April 25.
  4. ^ Each at-large delegate is pledged to support a specific presidential candidate as determined per the statewide qualified popular vote result of the primary held on February 11, but the exact name of the at-large delegate will only be elected among the participating delegates at the "New Hampshire national convention delegation meeting" on April 25.
  5. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined
  6. ^ Patrick with 0.8%; Bennet with 0.6%; Bloomberg with 0.5%
  7. ^ Patrick with 1.0%; Bennet with 0.3%; Bloomberg not reported
  8. ^ FiveThirtyEight aggregates polls with a trendline regression of polls rather than a strict average of recent polls.
  9. ^ Bloomberg with 2.3%; Patrick with 0.7%; Bennet with 0.5%
  10. ^ Bloomberg with 0.9%; Patrick with 0.8%; Bennet with 0.5%
  11. ^ Patrick with 0.4%; Bennet with 0.3%; Booker with 0.1%; Boyd, Burke, Bullock, Castro, De La Fuente III, Delaney, Dunlap, Ellinger, Gleib, Greenstein, Harris, Hewes, Koos, Kraus, Krichevsky, Moroz, Sloan, Sestak, Thistle, Torgesen, Wells and Williamson with 0.0%; other (write-in candidates) with 1.5%
  12. ^ a b Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  13. ^ Patrick with 0.4%; Bennet with 0.3%; Booker with 0.1%; Boyd, Burke, Bullock, Castro, De La Fuente III, Delaney, Dunlap, Ellinger, Gleib, Greenstein, Harris, Hewes, Koos, Kraus, Krichevsky, Moroz, Sloan, Sestak, Thistle, Torgesen, Wells and Williamson; other (write-in candidates) with 1.5%
  14. ^ By the time of this poll, Data for Progress, which has worked with both the Sanders and Warren campaigns, had endorsed Warren
  15. ^ Bennet, Bloomberg and Patrick with 1%; other with 2%
  16. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 1%; "someone else" with 2%
  17. ^ Patrick with 1%; Bennet with 0%
  18. ^ Patrick with 1%; Bennet with 0%; other with 2%; refused with 0%
  19. ^ Not yet released
  20. ^ Not yet released
  21. ^ Not yet released
  22. ^ Not yet released
  23. ^ Bennet and Bloomberg with 0%; Patrick with no voters; other with 1%
  24. ^ Patrick with 1%; Bennet with 0%; "someone else" with 3%
  25. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 0%; "Other" with 3%
  26. ^ Bennet with 1%; Patrick with no voters; other with 2%
  27. ^ Patrick with 1%; Bennet with 0%; "someone else" with 2%
  28. ^ Bloomberg with 1%; others with 1%
  29. ^ Patrick and Bennet with 0%; "someone else" with 3%
  30. ^ Bennet with 1%; Patrick with 0%; "Other" with 3%
  31. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 1%; "another candidate" with 3%
  32. ^ Bloomberg with 2%; Patrick and Bennet with 0%; "Other" with 1%
  33. ^ Patrick and Bennet with 0%; "someone else" with 3%
  34. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 1%; "Other" with 2%
  35. ^ Patrick and Bennet with 1%; "Other" with 1%
  36. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 0%; "Other" with 1%
  37. ^ Bennet with 1%; Patrick with <1%; "Other" with 1%
  38. ^ If the primary came down to the five candidates listed in this poll
  39. ^ "None of these/won't vote" with 3%
  40. ^ If the primary came down to the four candidates listed in this poll
  41. ^ "None of these/won't vote" with 3%
  42. ^ Patrick and Bennet with 0%; "someone else" with 2%
  43. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 0%; "Other" with 1%
  44. ^ Patrick with 1%; Bennet with 0%; "someone else" with 2%
  45. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 1%; "Other" with 1%
  46. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 0%; "someone else" with 4%
  47. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 0%; "someone else" with 2%
  48. ^ Bloomberg with 2%; Bennet and Patrick with <1%
  49. ^ Bloomberg with 2%; Bennet with 1%; Patrick with no voters; other with 2%
  50. ^ Patrick with 1%; Bennet and Delaney with 0%
  51. ^ Bennet, Delaney, and Patrick with 0%; "Other" with 2%
  52. ^ Bloomberg (explicitly as a write in) and Patrick with 2%; Bennet with 1%; "Other" with 3%; Delaney not reported
  53. ^ Bloomberg with 3%; Bennet with 2%; Delaney and Patrick with 0%; "Other" with 2%
  54. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 1%; Delaney with <1%
  55. ^ Bloomberg and Delaney with 1%; Bennet and Patrick with 0%
  56. ^ Bloomberg and Patrick with 1%; Bennet with <1%; Delaney with 0%; some other candidate with 2%; would not vote with <1%
  57. ^ Listed as "Don't know/refused"
  58. ^ Bennet and Patrick with 1%; Delaney with 0%
  59. ^ Delaney with 1%; Bennet and Patrick with no voters; "someone else" with 6%
  60. ^ Bloomberg with 4%; Bennet, Delaney, Patrick and Williamson with no voters; other with 1%
  61. ^ Sponsored by a presidential candidate's campaign
  62. ^ Booker with 2%; "someone else" with 1%
  63. ^ Bennet with 2%; Booker with 1%; Delaney and Williamson with 0%; Patrick and "Someone else" with 0%
  64. ^ If the primary came down to the seven candidates listed in this poll
  65. ^ "None of these" with 3%; Booker with 2%
  66. ^ If the primary came down to the four candidates listed in this poll
  67. ^ "None of these" with 5%
  68. ^ Booker with 2%; Patrick with 1%; Bennet, Castro, Delaney, and Williamson with 0%; "Someone else" with 0%
  69. ^ Steyer with 3%; Bloomberg with 2%; Williamson with 1%; Bennet with <1%; Castro and Delaney with 0%; someone else with 2%; would not vote with 3%
  70. ^ Includes "refused"
  71. ^ Steyer with 3%; Bloomberg and Williamson with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro and Delaney and Sestak and with 0%; someone else with 2%
  72. ^ Steyer with 2%; Bullock, Castro and Delaney with 1%; Bennet, Sestak and Williamson with 0%; others with 2%; refused with 1%
  73. ^ Steyer with 5%; Delaney and Williamson with 0%
  74. ^ Steyer with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro, Delaney, Messam, Sestak, Williamson with 0%, "Someone else" with 2%
  75. ^ Steyer with 3%; Bennet and Castro, with 1%, Bullock, Delaney, Messam, Sestak, Williamson with 0%
  76. ^ Steyer with 3%; Sestak with 1%; Bennet, Castro, Delaney and other with 0%
  77. ^ Steyer with 1%; Castro with 0% and Williamson with 0%; other with 3%
  78. ^ a b c The poll did not announce this result separately; it is listed as part of 'Other'.
  79. ^ Steyer with 4%; Ryan with 1%, Bennet, Bullock, Castro, Delaney, Messam, Sestak, and Williamson with 0%; "someone else" with 0%
  80. ^ Steyer with 2%; "Other" with 1%; Castro with 0%; Delaney, Bullock, Bennet and Williamson with less than 1%
  81. ^ Steyer with 2%; Williamson with 1%; Castro, Delaney and Ryan with <1%; Bennet, de Blasio, Bullock, Messam and Sestak with 0%; "no one" with 1%;
  82. ^ Steyer with 2%; de Blasio, Delaney, and Williamson with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro, Messam, Ryan and Sestak with 0%
  83. ^ Castro with 1%; others with 2%
  84. ^ Delaney with 3%; Williamson with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro, de Blasio, Messam, Ryan, and Sestak with 0%; someone else with 3%
  85. ^ Steyer with 1%; Bennet, de Blasio, Bullock, Castro, Delaney, Messam, Ryan, Sestak, and Williamson with 0%
  86. ^ Steyer with 4%; Castro with 2%; Gillibrand and Inslee with 1%
  87. ^ Bennet with 2%; Delaney, Gillibrand, Williamson, and Steyer with 1%; others with 0%
  88. ^ Castro, Delaney, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, and Steyer with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, de Blasio, Gravel, Inslee, Messam, Moulton, Ryan, Sestak, and Williamson with 0%
  89. ^ Bennet, Delaney, Gillibrand, and Williamson with 1%; de Blasio, Inslee, Moulton, Ryan, and Steyer with 0%
  90. ^ Williamson with 2%; Gillibrand with 1%; Inslee with 0%
  91. ^ Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, and Williamson with 1%; Bennet, de Blasio, Castro, Delaney, Inslee, Moulton, Ryan, and Swalwell with 0%
  92. ^ Gillibrand, Gravel, Inslee, and Moulton with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro, Delaney, Hickenlooper, Ryan, Swalwell, and Williamson with 0%
  93. ^ Delaney, Gravel, and Inslee with 1%; Bullock, Castro, de Blasio, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Messam, Moulton, Ryan, Swalwell, and Williamson with 0%
  94. ^ Gillibrand and Hickenlooper with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro, de Blasio, Delaney, Gravel, Inslee, Messam, Moulton, Ryan, Swalwell, and Williamson with 0%; others with 1%
  95. ^ Hickenlooper and Ryan with 1%; Bullock, Delaney, Gillibrand, and Williamson with <1%; Bennet, Castro, de Blasio, Gravel, Inslee, Messam, Moulton, and Swalwell with 0%
  96. ^ Delaney with 2%; Moulton, and Ryan with 1%; Abrams, Bennet, Bullock, Castro, Gillibrand, Gravel, Hickenlooper, Inslee, Swalwell, and Williamson with 0%
  97. ^ Delaney with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro, de Blasio, Gillibrand, Gravel, Hickenlooper, Inslee, Messam, Moulton, Ryan, Swalwell, and Williamson with 0%; others with 0%
  98. ^ Ryan with 2%; Gillibrand, Messam, and Swalwell with 1%; Castro, Delaney, Hickenlooper, Inslee, and Williamson with 0%; others with 0%
  99. ^ Delaney, Gillibrand, and Hickenlooper with 1%; Inslee with 0%; others with 6%
  100. ^ Bloomberg, Brown, and Gillibrand with 1%; Delaney and Hickenlooper with 0%; others with 3%
  101. ^ Bloomberg with 2%; Brown, Delaney, and Gillibrand with 1%; Castro with 0%; others with 5%
  102. ^ Gillibrand with 3%; Bloomberg with 2%; Castro with 1%; others with 3%
  103. ^ Gillibrand with 0%
  104. ^ Kennedy with 9%; Clinton with 3%; Bloomberg, Kerry, and Klobuchar with 2%; Brown, Bullock, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Ojeda, and Steyer with 1%; Castro, Cuomo, Delaney, Holder, Inslee, McAuliffe, Schultz, and Swalwell with 0%
  105. ^ Kennedy with 7%; Holder with 2%; O'Malley with 1%; Delaney, Gillibrand, and Hickenlooper with 0%; others with 2%
  106. ^ Gillibrand and McAuliffe with 2%
  107. ^ Gillibrand with 3%; McAuliffe with 2%; others with 1%
  108. ^ Kennedy with 3%; O'Malley with 2%; Gillibrand and Hickenlooper with 1%; Ryan with 0%; others with 2%
  109. ^ Gillibrand with 2%; O'Malley with 1%; others with 4%
  110. ^ O'Malley with 3%; Hickenlooper and Zuckerberg with 2%; Gillibrand, and Ryan with 1%; Delaney with 0%; others with 5%
  111. ^ Number of pledged delegates towards the 2020 Democratic National Convention.[16][1]
  112. ^ Other write-ins (173 votes) does not include Michael Bloomberg (4,777 votes), Donald Trump (1,219 votes) and Bill Weld (16 votes). Total number of all write-ins was 6,185 votes.[20]
  113. ^ Including 4,777 statewide votes for Michael Bloomberg[21]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "New Hampshire Democratic Delegation 2020". The Green Papers. March 31, 2019. Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Results: New Hampshire 2020 Presidential Primary - Democratic President". New Hampshire Secretary of State. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Ballots Cast 2020 Presidential Primary of New Hampshire: Ballots cast - Summary by counties (last update: 11:00am Feb.18)". New Hampshire Secretary of State. Retrieved February 25, 2020.
  4. ^ Raymond, Adam K. (February 12, 2020). "New Hampshire Democratic Primary Turnout Sets New Record". Intelligencer. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  5. ^ "New Hampshire Election Laws, 655:48 Fees". New Hampshire Secretary of State. 2017. Retrieved April 17, 2019.
  6. ^ "Live Results: New Hampshire Primary". NPR. February 11, 2020. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  7. ^ "Content - NHSOS". sos.nh.gov. Archived from the original on November 7, 2019.
  8. ^ Paul Steinhauser (September 26, 2017) Trump fuels early N.H. visits by potential 2020 Democratic White House contenders, Concord Monitor .
  9. ^ Sganga, Nicole (September 7, 2019). "2020 Democratic candidates speak at New Hampshire cattle call". CBS News. Archived from the original on February 5, 2020. Retrieved February 5, 2020.
  10. ^ Zach Montellaro (December 12, 2019). "DNC announces 2020 debates in four early states". Politico. Archived from the original on December 12, 2019. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  11. ^ Sylvia, Andrew (January 8, 2020). "Lesser-known presidential candidates make their case in downtown Manchester". Manchester Ink Link.
  12. ^ de Silva, Chantal (February 11, 2020). "Klobuchar Leads New Hampshire Midnight Vote; Bloomberg wins support despite not being on ballot". Newsweek. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  13. ^ Baker, Billy (February 11, 2020). "Dixville Notch Goes for Bloomberg". Boston Globe. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  14. ^ "Small New Hampshire town votes for Bloomberg in primary". Politico. Associated Press. February 11, 2020. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  15. ^ "Live New Hampshire primary 2020 results". NBC News. February 11, 2020. Retrieved February 11, 2020. Bernie Sanders has won the New Hampshire Democratic primary by a margin of about 4,000 votes, or less than 2 percentage points, over Pete Buttigieg, according to an NBC News projection.
  16. ^ a b "Live Results: New Hampshire Primary". The New York Times. February 11, 2020. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  17. ^ William A. Galston & Elaine Kamarck (February 11, 2020). "What do the results of the 2020 New Hampshire primary mean?". Brookings Institution. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  18. ^ Adam K. Raymond (February 12, 2020). "New Hampshire Democratic Primary Turnout Sets New Record". New York. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  19. ^ "New Hampshire 2020 Primary: Live Results". The New York Times. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  20. ^ a b c d e f "2020 Presidential Primary - Democratic Write-Ins (last update: 19:06 Feb.13)". New Hampshire Secretary of State. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  21. ^ a b Marc Fortier (February 13, 2020). "Bloomberg Beat 2 Well-Known Democrats in the NH Primary. He Wasn't Even on the Ballot". NBC Boston (WBTS-CD). Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  22. ^ Martin, Jonathan; Burns, Alexander (February 11, 2020). "Bernie Sanders Scores Narrow Victory in New Hampshire Primary". The New York Times. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  23. ^ a b King, Ledyard (February 12, 2020). "Bernie Sanders wins New Hampshire, while Buttigieg, Klobuchar finishes are keeping the field muddled". USA Today. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  24. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (February 12, 2020). "How Sanders Held Off Buttigieg And Klobuchar In New Hampshire". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  25. ^ Shepard, Steven (February 11, 2020). "What New Hampshire's exit polls tell us about the primary". Politico. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  26. ^ Julie Turkewitz, Maggie Astor (February 11, 2020). "Michael Bennet Drops Out of the 2020 Presidential Race". The New York Times.
  27. ^ Stevens, Matt (February 11, 2020). "Andrew Yang Drops Out: 'It Is Clear Tonight From the Numbers That We Are Not Going to Win'". New York Times.
  28. ^ Morin, Rebecca (February 12, 2020). "Deval Patrick drops out of Democratic presidential race". USA Today.

External linksEdit