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2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

The 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses will be a series of electoral contests organized by the Democratic Party to select the approximately 3,768 pledged delegates to the Democratic National Convention, who by pledged votes shall elect the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.[1] The elections are scheduled to take place from February to June 2020, within all fifty U.S. states, the District of Columbia, five U.S. territories, and Democrats Abroad. An extra 764[b] unpledged delegates (superdelegates), including party leaders and elected officials, will be appointed by the party leadership independently of the primary's electoral process; but their influence towards electing the presidential nominee has been significantly reduced after the DNC decided to remove their voting rights for the first ballot at a contested convention.[1][2] The convention also approves the party's political platform and vice-presidential nominee.

2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

← 2016
2024 →

For a contested convention:
3,768 (first ballot)[1][a] or 4,532 (subsequent ballots)[1][b] eligible delegates vote
1,885 (first ballot)[1][a] or 2,267 (subsequent ballots)[1][b] delegate votes needed to win

Previous Democratic nominee

Hillary Clinton



As of May 2019, a total of 25 major candidates have entered the race to be elected as the Democratic Party presidential nominee, of which so far only one (Ojeda) opted to withdraw before the first official debates. This is the largest presidential primary field for any political party in American history, eclipsing the 17 major candidates of the 2016 Republican Party presidential primaries.[3]

Contents

BackgroundEdit

After Hillary Clinton's loss in the previous election, the Democratic Party was seen as not having a clear leader.[4] There remained divisions in the party following the 2016 primaries which pitted Clinton against Bernie Sanders.[5][6] Between the 2016 election and the 2018 midterm elections, Senate Democrats have generally shifted to the political left in relation to college tuition, healthcare, and immigration.[7][8]

Soon after the 2016 general election, the division between Clinton and Sanders supporters was highlighted in the 2017 Democratic National Committee chairmanship election between Tom Perez and Keith Ellison.[9] Perez was narrowly elected Chairman and subsequently appointed Ellison as the Deputy Chair, a largely ceremonial role.[7][8] Several candidates began releasing serious policy proposals early in 2019 resulting in the "invisible primary" being more visible than in previous elections.[citation needed] The number of viable candidates running for the presidency is the largest in history.[10]

Reforms since 2016Edit

On August 25, 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) members passed reforms to the Democratic Party's primary process in order to increase participation[11] and ensure transparency.[12]

The new reforms regulate how the Democratic National Convention shall handle the outcome of primaries and caucuses for three potential scenarios:[1][2]

  1. Min. 2,267 pledged delegates won by a single candidate: Superdelegates allowed to vote at first ballot, as their influence can not overturn the majority of pledged delegates.
  2. 1885-2,266 pledged delegates won by a single candidate: Superdelegates barred from voting at first ballot, which solely will be decided by the will of pledged delegates.
  3. No candidate will win more than 1884 pledged delegates: Results in a contested convention, where superdelegates are barred from voting at the first formal ballot, but regain their right to vote for their preferred presidential nominee for all subsequent ballots needed until the delegates reach a majority.

The reforms mandate that superdelegates refrain from voting on the first presidential nominating ballot, unless a candidate via the outcome of primaries and caucuses already has gained enough votes (more than 50% of all delegate votes) among only the elected pledged delegates. This mean that only elections resulting in minimum 2,267 pledged delegates won by a single candidate, would trigger a potential regained right of superdelegates to vote at the first ballot, and such regained right could never overturn the majority will of the people (represented by the elected pledged delegates). The prohibition for superdelegates to vote at the first ballot for the mentioned scenario, does not preclude superdelegates from publicly endorsing a candidate of their choosing before the convention.[2]

In a contested convention where no majority of minimum 1,885 pledged delegate votes is found for a single candidate in the first ballot, all superdelegates will then regain their right to vote on any subsequent ballot necessary in order for a presidential candidate to be nominated (raising the majority needed for such to 2,267 votes).[1][2]

Caucuses are required to have absentee voting or to otherwise allow those who cannot participate in person to be included. State parties are encouraged to use a government-run primary and increase primaries' accessibility, including through same-day or automatic registration and same-day party switching.[11]

CandidatesEdit

Declared candidatesEdit

In addition to having filed with the Federal Election Commission to run for president in the Democratic Party primary in 2020 and having confirmed this by an official campaign announcement (while still campaigning actively as of today), the 24 major candidates have either: (a) held public office; (b) been included in a minimum of five independent national polls; or (c) received substantial media coverage.[13][14][15][16][17][18]

Name Born Experience State Campaign
Announcement date
Ref.
 
Michael Bennet
November 28, 1964
(age 54)
New Delhi, India
U.S. Senator from Colorado (2009–present)
Superintendent of Denver Public Schools (2005-2009)
 
Colorado
 
Campaign
Campaign: May 2, 2019
FEC filing[19]
[20]
 
Joe Biden
November 20, 1942
(age 76)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Vice President of the United States (2009–2017)
U.S. Senator from Delaware (1973–2009)
Democratic candidate for President in 1988 and 2008
 
Delaware
 
Campaign
Campaign: April 25, 2019
FEC filing[21]
[22]
 
Cory Booker
April 27, 1969
(age 50)
Washington, D.C.
U.S. Senator from New Jersey (2013–present)
Mayor of Newark, New Jersey (2006–2013)
 
New Jersey
 
Campaign
Campaign: February 1, 2019
FEC filing[23]
[24]
 
Steve Bullock
April 11, 1966
(age 53)
Missoula, Montana
Governor of Montana (2013–present)
Attorney General of Montana (2009–2013)
 
Montana
 
Campaign
Campaign: May 14, 2019
FEC filing[25]
[26][27]
 
Pete Buttigieg
January 19, 1982
(age 37)
South Bend, Indiana
Mayor of South Bend, Indiana (2012–present)
Lieutenant, United States Navy Reserve (2009-2017)
Democratic candidate for Indiana State Treasurer in 2010
 
Indiana
 
Campaign
Exploratory committee: January 23, 2019
Campaign: April 14, 2019

FEC filing[28]
[29]
 
Julián Castro
September 16, 1974
(age 44)
San Antonio, Texas
U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2014–2017)
Mayor of San Antonio, Texas (2009–2014)
 
Texas
 
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
December 12, 2018
Campaign: January 12, 2019

FEC filing[30]
[31]
 
Bill de Blasio
May 8, 1961
(age 58)
Manhattan, New York
Mayor of New York, New York (2014–present)
New York City Public Advocate (2010-2013)
New York City Councilman (2002-2009)
 
New York
 
Campaign
Campaign: May 16, 2019
FEC filing[32]
[33]
 
John Delaney
April 16, 1963
(age 56)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
U.S. Representative from MD-06 (2013–2019)  
Maryland
 
Campaign
Campaign: July 28, 2017
FEC filing[34]
[35]
 
Tulsi Gabbard
April 12, 1981
(age 38)
Leloaloa, American Samoa
U.S. Representative from HI-02 (2013–present)
Honolulu City Councilwoman (2011-2012)
State Representative (2002-2004)
 
Hawaii
 
Campaign
Campaign: January 11, 2019
FEC filing[36]
[37]
 
Kirsten Gillibrand
December 9, 1966
(age 52)
Albany, New York
U.S. Senator from New York (2009–present)
U.S. Representative from NY-20 (2007–2009)
 
New York
 
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
January 15, 2019
Campaign: March 17, 2019

FEC filing[38]
[39]
 
Mike Gravel
May 13, 1930
(age 89)
Springfield, Massachusetts
U.S. Senator from Alaska (1969–1981)
Democratic and Libertarian candidate for President in 2008
Democratic candidate for Vice President in 1972
 
California
 
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
March 19, 2019
Campaign: April 8, 2019

FEC filing[40]
[41]
 
Kamala Harris
October 20, 1964
(age 54)
Oakland, California
U.S. Senator from California (2017–present)
Attorney General of California (2011–2017)
 
California
 
Campaign
Campaign: January 21, 2019
FEC filing[42]
[43]
 
John Hickenlooper
February 7, 1952
(age 67)
Narberth, Pennsylvania
Governor of Colorado (2011–2019)
Mayor of Denver, Colorado (2003–2011)
 
Colorado
 
Campaign
Campaign: March 4, 2019
FEC filing[44]
[45]
 
Jay Inslee
February 9, 1951
(age 68)
Seattle, Washington
Governor of Washington (2013–present)
U.S. Representative from Washington (1993-1995; 1999–2012)
WA-04 (1993–1995); WA-01 (1999-2012)
 
Washington
 
Campaign
Campaign: March 1, 2019
FEC filing[46]
[47]
 
Amy Klobuchar
May 25, 1960
(age 58)
Plymouth, Minnesota
U.S. Senator from Minnesota (2007–present)
County Attorney for Hennepin County, Minnesota (1999-2007)
 
Minnesota
 
Campaign
Campaign: February 10, 2019
FEC filing[48]
[49]
 
Wayne Messam
June 7, 1974
(age 44)
South Bay, Florida
Mayor of Miramar, Florida (2015–present)  
Florida
 
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
March 13, 2019
Campaign: March 28, 2019

FEC filing[50]
[51]
 
Seth Moulton
October 24, 1978
(age 40)
Salem, Massachusetts
U.S. Representative from MA-06 (2015–present)
Captain, United States Marine Corps (2001-2008)
 
Massachusetts
 
Campaign
Campaign: April 22, 2019
FEC filing[52]
[53]
 
Beto O'Rourke
September 26, 1972
(age 46)
El Paso, Texas
U.S. Representative from TX-16 (2013–2019)
Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate from Texas in 2018
 
Texas
 
Campaign
Campaign: March 14, 2019
FEC filing[54]
[55]
 
Tim Ryan
July 16, 1973
(age 45)
Niles, Ohio
U.S. Representative from Ohio (2003–present)
OH-17 (2003–2013); OH-13 (2013-present)
 
Ohio
 
Campaign
Campaign: April 4, 2019
FEC filing[56]
[57]
 
Bernie Sanders
September 8, 1941
(age 77)
Brooklyn, New York
U.S. Senator from Vermont (2007–present)
U.S. Representative from VT-AL (1991–2007)
Mayor of Burlington, Vermont (1981–1989)
Democratic candidate for President in 2016
 
Vermont
 
Campaign
Campaign: February 19, 2019
FEC filing[58]
[59]
 
Eric Swalwell
November 16, 1980
(age 38)
Sac City, Iowa
U.S. Representative from CA-15 (2013–present)
Dublin City Councilman (2010–2013)
 
California
 
Campaign
Campaign: April 8, 2019
FEC filing[60]
[61]
 
Elizabeth Warren
June 22, 1949
(age 69)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
U.S. Senator from Massachusetts (2013–present)  
Massachusetts
 
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
December 31, 2018
Campaign: February 9, 2019

FEC filing[62]
[63]
 
Marianne Williamson
July 8, 1952
(age 66)
Houston, Texas
Author, lecturer, and activist
Independent candidate for U.S. Representative from CA-33 in 2014
 
California
 
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
November 15, 2018
Campaign: January 28, 2019

FEC filing[64]
[65]
 
Andrew Yang
January 13, 1975
(age 44)
Schenectady, New York
Entrepreneur, philanthropist, and founder of Venture for America  
New York
 
Campaign
Campaign: November 6, 2017
FEC filing[66]
[67]

Beside the 24 major candidates, more than 230 other candidates who did not meet the criteria above to be deemed major, also filed with the Federal Election Commission to run for president in the Democratic Party primary.[68] Among the other candidates, the notable ones who are still active include:

Withdrawn candidatesEdit

The candidates in this section have withdrawn or suspended their campaigns.

Candidate Born Experience State Campaign Ref
 
Richard Ojeda
September 25, 1970
(age 48)
Rochester, Minnesota
West Virginia State Senator (2016–2019)
Democratic nominee for U.S. Representative from WV-03 in 2018
 
West Virginia
 
Campaign
Announced: November 11, 2018
FEC filing[82]
Suspended: January 25, 2019
[83][84]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interestEdit

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for president within the last six months, as of May 2019.

Declined to be candidatesEdit

These individuals have been the subject of speculation, but have publicly denied or recanted interest in running for president.

DebatesEdit

In December 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced the preliminary schedule for 12 official debates, set to begin in June 2019, with six debates in 2019 and the remaining six during the first four months of 2020. Candidates who qualify to participate in the DNC-sanctioned debates are expected to refrain from participating in any other debates against candidates, although they will be allowed to participate in forums featuring multiple other candidates as long as only one candidate appears on stage at a time.[170]

Debate schedule
No. Date Time Place Sponsor(s) Ref(s)
1A Jun 26, 2019 9–11 p.m. EDT Arsht Center
Miami, Florida
NBC News/
MSNBC/Telemundo
[171]
1B Jun 27, 2019 9–11 p.m. EDT
2A Jul 30, 2019 TBA Venue TBA
Detroit, Michigan
CNN [172]
2B Jul 31, 2019 TBA
3 Sep 2019 TBA [170]
4 Oct 2019
5 Nov 2019
6 Dec 2019
7 Jan–Apr 2020
8
9
10
11
12

If any debates will be scheduled to take place with a location in the first four primary states (Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina), DNC has decided such debates at the earliest will be held in 2020.[170] DNC also announced that it would not partner with Fox News as a media sponsor for any debates.[173][174] Fox News had last held a Democratic debate in 2003.[175]

Participating candidates
Candidate 1A 1B 2A 2B 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

 P  Present  A  Absent  I  Invited  O  Invited to other debate  N  Not invited  TBA  To be announced  W  Withdrawn

Bennet TBA TBA
Biden TBA TBA
Booker TBA TBA
Bullock TBA TBA
Buttigieg TBA TBA
Castro TBA TBA
de Blasio TBA TBA
Delaney TBA TBA
Gabbard TBA TBA
Gillibrand TBA TBA
Gravel TBA TBA
Harris TBA TBA
Hickenlooper TBA TBA
Inslee TBA TBA
Klobuchar TBA TBA
Messam TBA TBA
Moulton TBA TBA
O'Rourke TBA TBA
Ryan TBA TBA
Sanders TBA TBA
Swalwell TBA TBA
Warren TBA TBA
Williamson TBA TBA
Yang TBA TBA
Ref(s) [171]

Qualification of candidates for debatesEdit

First two debatesEdit

In order to qualify for the first two debates, debate entrants must as minimum comply with one of the two below listed criteria (and if this test results in more than 20 qualified candidates, the two criteria will be evaluated in combination as per the outlined tiebreaking rules):

  • Fundraising criteria: Meet a fundraising threshold, in which a candidate must receive donations from a minimum of 65,000 unique donors, with at least 200 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.[176] Candidates who wish to qualify using the fundraising threshold must present evidence to the DNC of their eligibility using donor data collected by ActBlue or NGP VAN.[177]
  • Tiebreaking rules (limiting the number of qualified candidates to 20):
    • (1) Candidates meeting both criteria will have primacy over those who only met one criteria. If more than 20 candidates met both criteria, only the top 20 candidates with the highest polling averages will be invited. The polling averages for candidates will be calculated as the average of their three best results in any qualifying polls, rounded to the nearest tenth. Should multiple candidates still be tied for the 20th spot in the debates, the candidates will be further ranked by the number of polls in which each candidate received at least 1% support. The percentages used will be the "top-line number listed in the original public release from the approved sponsoring organization/institution, whether or not it is a rounded or weighted number".[177]
    • (2) If more than 20 candidates qualify by either criteria but fewer than 20 candidates qualified on the basis of both criteria and more than 20 met the polling criteria, then: All candidates who met both criteria will be invited, with the rest of the available slots awarded to the remaining candidates who only met the polling criteria, with priority given to those with the highest polling averages (as calculated per the method described under rule 1).[177]
    • (3) If more than 20 candidates qualify by either criteria but fewer than 20 candidates qualified on the basis of both criteria and fewer than 20 met the polling criteria, then: All candidates who met both criteria and all candidates who only met the polling criteria will be invited, with the rest of the available slots awarded to the remaining candidates who only met the fundraising criteria, with priority given to those with the highest number of unique donors.[177]

For the first debate, candidates must meet the above criteria either by June 12[178] or by June 13,[179] as the DNC has not yet specified the exact deadline.[177] An analysis by CNN indicated that 19 candidates had already met one of the two criteria by May 16, based on public polls without subjecting them to calculated adjustments and self-reported fundraising information before verification.[180]

Each of the first two debates will take place during two consecutive nights, with a maximum of 10 candidates per night. For each of the two first debates, the DNC will draw lots among the candidates meeting either of the above thresholds to determine whether they will participate in the debate on the first or second night.[181][182]

Candidate Met donor criteria
(3rd tiebreak priority)
Met polling criteria
(2nd tiebreak priority)
Met both criteria
(1st tiebreak priority)
Ref(s)
Biden Yes Yes Yes [180]
Booker Yes Yes Yes [180][183]
Buttigieg Yes Yes Yes [180]
Castro Yes Yes Yes [180][184]
Gabbard Yes Yes Yes [180]
Harris Yes Yes Yes [180]
Klobuchar Yes Yes Yes [180]
O'Rourke Yes Yes Yes [180]
Sanders Yes Yes Yes [180]
Warren Yes Yes Yes [180]
Yang Yes Yes Yes [180]
de Blasio No Yes No [180][185]
Delaney No Yes No [180]
Gillibrand No Yes No [180][186]
Hickenlooper No Yes No [180]
Inslee No
(60,000 donors on May 20)
Yes No [180][187]
Ryan No Yes No [180]
Swalwell No Yes No [180]
Williamson Yes No
(2 polls at ≥1%)
No [180][188][189]
Bullock No Maybe[d]
(2–3 polls at ≥1%)
No [180][190]
Bennet No No
(2 polls at ≥1%)
No [180]
Gravel No
(35,000 donors on May 14)
No
(0 polls at ≥1%)
No [196][197]
Messam No No
(1 poll at ≥1%)
No [180]
Moulton No No
(0 polls at ≥1%)
No [180]

Subsequent debatesEdit

According to DNC chairman Tom Perez, the qualification criteria for candidates to participate in the third debate and later debates are yet to be decided, but he expects them to evolve and become more strict to meet - resulting in fewer candidates qualifying for the subsequent debates. Qualification criteria for the third debate will be published by DNC "in ample time ahead of the third debate".[198][199]

ForumsEdit

In addition to the party-sponsored debates, several private organizations are hosting forums focusing on select issues and candidates.

  Upcoming forums
Name Issues Date Place Sponsors Participants Ref
Heartland Forum Economic issues affecting rural Americans March 30, 2019 Buena Vista University,
Storm Lake, Iowa
Open Markets Institute Action
HuffPost
Storm Lake Times
Iowa Farmers Union
Castro, Delaney, Klobuchar, Ryan, Warren [200][201]
We the People Membership Summit Democracy reform April 1, 2019 Warner Theatre,
Washington, D.C.
Center for Popular Democracy Action
Communications Workers of America
Planned Parenthood Action Fund
Service Employees International Union
SEIU 32BJ
Sierra Club
Booker, Castro, Gillibrand, Inslee, Klobuchar, O'Rourke, Sanders, Warren [202][203]
She the People Presidential Forum Issues affecting women of color April 24, 2019 Texas Southern University,
Houston, Texas
She the People Booker, Castro, Gabbard, Harris, Klobuchar, O'Rourke, Sanders, Warren [204][205]
National Forum on Wages and Working People: Creating an Economy that Works for All Economic issues affecting low-income Americans April 27, 2019 Las Vegas, Nevada Service Employees International Union

Center for American Progress Action Fund

Castro, Harris, Hickenlooper, Klobuchar, O'Rourke, Warren [206][207]
Big Ideas Forum One idea that can inspire voters and transform the country June 1, 2019 San Francisco, California MoveOn Castro, Gillibrand, Harris, Sanders, Warren, TBD [208][209]
N/A Expanding economic opportunity for black Americans June 15, 2019 Charleston, South Carolina Black Economic Alliance Booker, Buttigieg, TBD [210]
Asian American Pacific Islanders Progressive Democratic Presidential Forum Issues affecting Asian Pacific Americans September 8, 2019 Orange County, California AAPI Victory Fund
Asian Americans Rising
TBD [211][212]
N/A LGBT rights October 10, 2019 University of California, Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, California
Human Rights Campaign
University of California, Los Angeles
[213]

TimelineEdit

OverviewEdit

Active
campaign
Exploratory
committee
Withdrawn
candidate
Midterm
elections
Debate
Iowa
caucuses
Super
Tuesday
Democratic
convention
Richard Ojeda 2020 presidential campaignAndrew Yang 2020 presidential campaignMarianne Williamson 2020 presidential campaignElizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaignEric Swalwell 2020 presidential campaignBernie Sanders 2020 presidential campaignTim Ryan 2020 presidential campaignBeto O'Rourke 2020 presidential campaignSeth Moulton 2020 presidential campaignWayne Messam 2020 presidential campaignAmy Klobuchar 2020 presidential campaignJay Inslee 2020 presidential campaignJohn Hickenlooper 2020 presidential campaignKamala Harris 2020 presidential campaignMike Gravel 2020 presidential campaignKirsten Gillibrand 2020 presidential campaignTulsi Gabbard 2020 presidential campaignJohn Delaney 2020 presidential campaignBill de Blasio 2020 presidential campaignJulian Castro 2020 presidential campaignPete Buttigieg 2020 presidential campaignSteve Bullock 2020 presidential campaignCory Booker 2020 presidential campaignJoe Biden 2020 presidential campaignMichael Bennet 2020 presidential campaign 

2017Edit

 
John Delaney was the first major candidate to announce his campaign, two and a half years before the 2020 Iowa caucus.

2018Edit

AugustEdit

  • August 25: Democratic Party officials and television networks begin discussions as to the nature and scheduling of the following year's debates and the nomination process.[215] Changes were made to the role of superdelegates, deciding to only allow them to vote on the first ballot if the nomination is uncontested.[216]

NovemberEdit

DecemberEdit

2019Edit

 
Sen. Kamala Harris launched her bid on January 21, 2019.
 
Sen. Elizabeth Warren launched her bid on February 9, 2019
 
Sen. Bernie Sanders launched his second campaign on February 19, 2019.
 
Rep. Beto O'Rourke launched his bid on March 14, 2019.
 
Former Vice President Joe Biden, pictured here campaigning for Doug Jones in 2017, launched his campaign on April 25, 2019.

JanuaryEdit

FebruaryEdit

MarchEdit

AprilEdit

MayEdit

JuneEdit

  • June 26: The first part of the first official debate takes place in Miami, Florida.
  • June 27: The second part of the first official debate takes place in Miami, Florida.

JulyEdit

  • July 30: The first part of the second official debate takes place in Detroit, Michigan
  • July 31: The second part of the second official debate takes place in Detroit, Michigan

Primary and caucus calendarEdit

 
Democratic primary and caucus calendar by currently scheduled date
  February
  March 3 (Super Tuesday)
  March 7–8
  March 10
  March 17
  April 4–7
  April 28
  May
  June
  No scheduled 2020 date

The following primary and caucus dates are based on state statutes or state party decisions, but are subject to change pending legislation, state party delegate selection plans, or the decisions of state secretaries of state:[244]

As of May 2019, primaries and caucuses for the following states and territories are not yet scheduled:

  • Georgia primary (previously held on March 1, 2016):[244] The Georgia Election Code empowers the Secretary of State to set the date for the primary on any date before the second tuesday in June. The Democratic state party expects the primary to be scheduled for March 3, 2020.[250]
  • American Samoa caucus (previously held on March 1, 2016)[244]
  • Maine caucus/primary: Previous legislation setting the date has expired.[251] Two competing bills have been tabled to replace the caucus with a primary on either March 3 (Super Tuesday),[252] or any date in March (chosen by the secretary of state).[253] In the absence of new legislation, the state party anticipates holding a caucus on March 8, 2020.[254] The Super Tuesday primary bill was voted against by minority Republicans due to budget concerns, but passed the recommendation stage at the Maine legislature’s voting committee,[255] and now awaits the outcome of the final votes soon to be cast by both chambers of the Maine Legislature.[256]
  • Northern Marianas caucus (previously held on March 12, 2016)[244]
  • Wyoming caucus/primary (previously held on April 9, 2016): The state party initially via its draft plan proposed a party-run caucus for March 2020,[257][258] then shortly considered moving it to April 18,[259] but now currently consider whether to replace it with a party-run primary (as a government-run primary is not an option in the state). The final decision setting the format and date will be communicated via an updated plan in the summer of 2019.[260]
  • New York primary (previously held on April 19, 2016):[244] The primary is currently scheduled for a default February 4 date only for procedural reasons, as the official date is not yet determined. The Democratic draft delegate selection plan has proposed April 28 as the actual date for the primary.[261][262] Leaders of the state legislature reportedly support the new April 28 proposal, but have yet to pass it.[263]
  • Guam caucus (previously held on May 7, 2016)[244]
  • Virgin Islands caucus (previously held on June 4, 2016)[244]

The 57 states/district/territories that will decide the Democratic nominee currently plan to hold 49 primaries and six caucuses (Iowa, Nevada and four territories), while two states have not yet decided their election format.[244] The number of states holding caucuses has significantly dwindled from the 2016 election where 37 held a primary and 14 held a caucus.[260]

National conventionEdit

The 2020 Democratic National Convention is scheduled to take place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on July 13–16, 2020.[264][265][266]

In addition to Milwaukee, the DNC also considered bids from three other cities: Houston, Texas;[267] Miami Beach, Florida[268]; and Denver, Colorado. Denver, though, was immediately withdrawn from consideration by representatives for the city, who cited scheduling conflicts.[269]

EndorsementsEdit

Primary election pollingEdit

Political positions of candidatesEdit

Campaign financeEdit

This is an overview of the money being raised and spent by each campaign for the entire period running from January 1, 2017 to March 31, 2019, as it was reported to the Federal Election Commission (FEC). Total raised are the sum of all individual contributions (large and small), loans from the candidate, and transfers from other campaign committees. The last column, Cash On Hand (COH), has been calculated by subtracting the "spent" amount from the "raised" amount, thereby showing the remaining cash each campaign had available for its future spending as of March 31, 2019.

  Withdrawn candidate
Candidate Campaign committee (January 1, 2017 to March 31, 2019)
Total raised Ind. contrib. <$200
donations
(as % of
ind.contrib)
Debt Spent COH
Bennet did not file
Biden did not file
Booker[270] $7,923,204 $5,044,390 15.97% $51,989 $1,792,194 $6,131,010
Bullock did not file
Buttigieg[271] $7,091,224 $7,086,155 64.02% $0 $685,295 $6,405,930
Castro[272] $1,321,029 $1,306,329 30.20% $19,285 $643,374 $677,655
de Blasio did not file
Delaney[273] $18,301,623 $1,681,310 6.96% $17,443,250 $7,781,888 $10,567,865
Gabbard[274] $4,495,770 $1,949,075 54.75% $0 $1,706,544 $2,789,226
Gillibrand[275] $12,601,580 $2,997,884 16.68% $0 $2,433,078 $10,168,502
Gravel did not file
Harris[276] $13,243,551 $12,024,122 36.77% $65,000 $4,285,426 $8,958,125
Hickenlooper[277] $2,020,683 $2,014,099 9.97% $0 $685,514 $1,335,169
Inslee[278] $2,256,655 $2,255,455 34.00% $365,195 $843,775 $1,412,881
Klobuchar[279] $8,832,322 $5,232,376 34.60% $0 $1,849,949 $6,982,373
Messam[280] $43,532 $43,532 26.58% $0 $1,701 $41,830
Moulton did not file
O'Rourke[281] $9,373,261 $9,369,861 59.15% $0 $2,511,056 $6,862,206
Ryan did not file
Sanders[282] $20,688,027 $18,186,300 84.03% $0 $5,026,077 $15,661,950
Swalwell did not file
Warren[283] $16,482,752 $6,016,435 70.30% $0 $5,267,562 $11,215,191
Williamson[284] $1,546,975 $1,544,697 60.39% $105,017 $997,471 $549,504
Yang[285] $2,387,537 $2,385,475 63.64% $0 $1,286,813 $1,151,702
Ojeda[286] $119,478 $77,476 62.91% $44,373 $117,476 $2,002

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Number is subject to change as possible penalties are not yet included.
  2. ^ a b c Number is subject to change due to possible deaths, resignations, accessions or selection as a pledged candidate.
  3. ^ a b c d e This individual is not a member of the Democratic Party, but has been the subject of speculation or expressed interest in running under this party.
  4. ^ Various sources disagree as to whether Bullock has met the polling criteria as of May 16, 2019 (CNN found incompliance while full compliance was claimed by FiveThirtyEight and Politico),[180][190][191] due to uncertainty as to whether polling results of open-ended (ABC News/Washington Post) surveys also will be used by the DNC to determine debate entrants.[192] Among potential qualifying polls, Bullock secured 1% in one such open-ended ABC/Washington Post Democratic primary poll in January 2019,[193] and also secured 1% in two other closed-ended polls: an online Ipsos/Reuters poll conducted in mid-April 2019,[194] and a CNN/Des Moines Register poll in March 2019.[195]

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