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2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

The 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses will be a series of electoral contests organized by the Democratic Party to select the 4,051 delegates to the Democratic National Convention and determine the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. The elections will take place within all fifty U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories. An extra 716 unpledged delegates (712 votes) or superdelegates, including party leaders and elected officials, will be appointed by the party leadership independently of the primary’s electoral process. The convention will also approve the party's platform and vice-presidential nominee.

2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

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4,051 delegate votes to the Democratic National Convention
2,026 delegate votes needed to win

Previous Democratic nominee

Hillary Clinton



Following the 2016 presidential elections, significant changes were proposed that would change the number and role of superdelegates in the nomination process.[1] Changes were enacted on August 25, 2018, which would allow superdelegates to vote on only the first ballot at a convention if it were uncontested.[2]

Contents

Candidates

Declared major candidates and exploratory committees

In addition to having announced that they are running for president in 2020 or having formed exploratory committees for the 2020 presidential election, the candidates in this section have held public office or have been included in a minimum of five independent national polls:

  Formed exploratory committee but has not officially declared their candidacy
Name Born Experience State Campaign
Announcement date
Ref
 
Pete Buttigieg
January 19, 1982
(age 37)
South Bend, Indiana
Mayor of South Bend, Indiana (2012–present)  
Indiana
 
(Website)
Formed exploratory committee:
January 23, 2019

[3]
 
Julian Castro
September 16, 1974
(age 44)
San Antonio, Texas
U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2014–2017)
Mayor of San Antonio, Texas (2009–2014)
 
Texas
 
(CampaignWebsite)
Announced campaign committee:
January 12, 2019

FEC filing
[4]
 
John Delaney
April 16, 1963
(age 55)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
U.S. Representative from MD-06 (2013–2019)  
Maryland
 
(CampaignWebsite)
Announced campaign:
July 28, 2017

FEC filing
[5]
 
Tulsi Gabbard
April 12, 1981
(age 37)
Leloaloa, American Samoa
U.S. Representative from HI-02 (2013–present)  
Hawaii
 
(CampaignWebsite)
Announced campaign:
January 11, 2019

FEC filing
[6][7]
 
Kirsten Gillibrand
December 9, 1966
(age 52)
Albany, New York
U.S. Senator from New York (2009–present)
U.S. Representative from NY-20 (2007–2009)
 
New York
 
(CampaignWebsite)
Formed exploratory committee:
January 15, 2019

FEC filing
[8]
 
Kamala Harris
October 20, 1964
(age 54)
Oakland, California
U.S. Senator from California (2017–present)  
California
 
(CampaignWebsite)
Announced campaign:
January 21, 2019

FEC filing
[9]
 
Richard Ojeda
September 25, 1970
(age 48)
Rochester, Minnesota
West Virginia State Senator (2016–2019)
Democratic nominee for U.S. Representative from WV-03 in 2018
 
West Virginia
 
(CampaignWebsite)
Announced campaign:
November 11, 2018

FEC filing
[10]
 
Elizabeth Warren
June 22, 1949
(age 69)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
U.S. Senator from Massachusetts (2013–present)  
Massachusetts
 
(CampaignWebsite)
Formed exploratory committee:
December 31, 2018

FEC filing
[11]

Other declared candidates

As of January 2019, 149 individuals have filed with the Federal Election Commission to run for President in the Democratic Party primary,[12] including the following notable candidates:

Name Born Experience State Campaign

Announcement date

Ref
 
Michael E. Arth
April 27, 1953
(age 65)
RAF Burtonwood, England
Artist, builder, architectural designer, and political scientist
Independent candidate for Governor of Florida in 2010
 
Florida
(Website)
Announced campaign:
November 4, 2018

FEC filing
-
 
Harry Braun
November 6, 1948
(age 70)
Compton, California
Renewable energy consultant and researcher
Candidate for U.S. Representative from GA-11 in 2018
Candidate for President in 2012 and 2016
Independent candidate for President in 2004
Democratic nominee for U.S. Representative from AZ-01 in 1984 and 1986
 
Georgia
(Website)
Announced campaign:
December 7, 2017

FEC filing
[14]
 
Ken Nwadike Jr.
December 29, 1981
(age 37)
San Diego, California
Documentary filmmaker, motivational speaker, and peace activist  
California
(Website)
Announced campaign:
October 18, 2017

FEC filing
[15]
 
Robby Wells
April 10, 1968
(age 50)
Bartow, Georgia
Former college football coach
Independent candidate for President in 2016
Constitution candidate for President in 2012
 
Georgia
(Website)
Announced campaign:
May 12, 2018

FEC filing
[16]
 
Andrew Yang
January 13, 1975
(age 44)
Schenectady, New York
Entrepreneur and founder of Venture for America  
New York
 
(CampaignWebsite)
Announced campaign:
November 6, 2017

FEC filing
[17]


Individuals with scheduled campaign announcements

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for president within the last six months. Some already have leadership PACs that function as campaign committees.[19]


Speculative candidates

The following people have been subjects of speculation about their potential candidacy within the last six months, although they have neither personally expressed interest nor declined to run.

Declined to be candidates

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Debates and forums

On December 20, 2018, Tom Perez, the chairman for the Democratic National Committee, announced the preliminary schedule for a series of official debates, set to begin in June 2019.[148] This is in addition to a series of forums and "cattle call" appearances where the candidates do not sit on the same stage and converse.[citation needed]

Timeline

Background

After Hillary Clinton's loss in the previous election, the Democratic Party was seen as not having a clear leader.[149] There remained divisions in the party following the 2016 primaries which pitted Clinton against independent democratic socialist Bernie Sanders.[150][151] Between the 2016 election and the 2018 midterm elections, Senate Democrats have generally shifted to the political left in terms to college tuition, healthcare, and immigration.[152][153]

Soon after the 2016 general election, the division between Clinton and Sanders supporters was highlighted in the 2017 Democratic National Committee chairmanship election between Tom Perez and Keith Ellison.[154] Perez was elected Chairman and appointed Ellison as the Deputy Chair, a largely ceremonial role.[152][153] Several candidates began releasing serious policy proposals early in 2019 resulting in the "invisible primary" becoming more visible than in previous elections.

Perez has commented that the 2020 primary field will likely go into double-digits, rivaling the size of the 2016 GOP primary, which consisted of 17 major candidates.[155] In response to criticism of their 2016 debate schedule, the DNC has planned for at least twelve televised debates (the first six taking place in 2019). Depending on the size of the primary field, Perez has floated the possibility of splitting a single debate between two nights at the same location, choosing the participants of each night publicly and at random. Additionally, instead of polling numbers being the sole margin of participating in a debate, grassroots fundraising amounts will also factor into a candidate's inclusion.[156]

Reflecting growing changes to the demographics of the elected Democratic officials, several female candidates are expected to enter the race, increasing the likelihood of the Democrats nominating a woman for the second time in a row.[157] The topic of age has been raised in regards to some of the most likely front-runners: Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders; who will be 78, 71, and 79 respectively on Inauguration Day. Former Democratic Senate Leader Harry Reid described the trio as "an old folks' home", expressing a need for younger, lesser known faces to step up and lead the party.[158]

Overview

Active campaigns
Formed exploratory committee
Ended campaigns
Iowa caucuses
Super Tuesday
Democratic National Convention
Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaignRichard Ojeda 2020 presidential campaignKamala Harris 2020 presidential campaignKirsten Gillibrand 2020 presidential campaignTulsi Gabbard 2020 presidential campaignJohn Delaney 2020 presidential campaignJulian Castro 2020 presidential campaignPete Buttigieg 2020 presidential campaign 

2017

2018

  • August 25: Democratic Party officials and television networks begin discussions as to the nature and scheduling of the following year's debates and the nomination process.[160] Changes were made to the role of superdelegates, deciding to only allow them to vote on the first ballot if the nomination is uncontested.[1]
  • November 11: West Virginia State Senator Richard Ojeda announces candidacy.[161]
  • December 12: Former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro forms a 2020 presidential exploratory committee.[162]
  • December 31: Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts forms an exploratory committee.[163]

2019

  • January: The Democratic National Committee plans to announce the criteria for candidates to be eligible to participate in sanctioned debates.[148][164]
  • January 11: U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii announces she has decided to run for president.[165]
  • January 12: Former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro officially announces his candidacy for president.[162][166]
  • January 15: Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York announces the formation of an exploratory committee.[167]
  • January 21: Senator Kamala Harris of California officially announces her candidacy for president.[9]
  • January 23: Mayor of South Bend, Indiana Pete Buttigieg announces the formation of a exploratory committee.[3]
  • Starting in June, a series of forums and debates are expected to take place.[148]
  • Official lists of candidates are expected to be placed on early primary ballots starting in late October.

2020

The following anticipated primary and caucus dates may change depending on legislation passed before the scheduled primary dates.[168]

February
March
  • March 3: Super Tuesday (Alabama, California, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, and Virginia primaries)[168]
  • March 7: Louisiana primary[168]
  • March 10: Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio primaries[168]
  • March 17: Arizona, Florida, and Illinois primaries[168]
  • Not yet determined: Colorado caucus (March 3, 10, or 17); Minnesota primary (March 3 by default, unless an alternate date is chosen)[168]
April
  • April 7: Wisconsin primary[168]
  • April 28: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries[168]
May
  • May 5: Indiana primary[168]
  • May 12: West Virginia primary[168]
  • May 19: Arkansas, Kentucky, and Oregon primaries[168]
June
  • June 2: Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota primaries[168]
  • June 7: Puerto Rico primary[168]
  • June 16: District of Columbia primary[168]
Other primaries and caucuses
  • Not yet determined (dates of 2016 primaries/caucuses listed in parentheses): American Samoa (March 1), Kansas (March 5), Maine (March 6), Northern Mariana Islands (March 12), Alaska, Hawaii, Washington (March 26), Wyoming (April 9), Guam (May 7), Virgin Islands (June 4), and North Dakota (June 7) caucuses and Democrats Abroad, Georgia (March 1), Nebraska (March 5), Idaho (March 22), and New York (April 19) primaries; Utah (March 22) has a presidential caucus, but a primary option if funded; New York primary is scheduled for February 4 for procedural reasons, but date is expected to be amended in June 2019[168]

National convention

The 2020 Democratic National Convention is scheduled for July 13–16, 2020.[169]

On June 20, 2018, the DNC announced four finalist bidders under consideration for the convention site: Houston, Texas,[170] Miami Beach, Florida,[171] (hosted the 1972 convention), Milwaukee, Wisconsin,[172] and Denver, Colorado. Denver was immediately withdrawn from consideration by representatives for the city, citing scheduling conflicts.[173]

Endorsements

Julian Castro
U.S. Executive Branch officials
U.S. Representatives
State legislators
Local officials
Individuals
John Delaney
U.S. Representatives
Kamala Harris
U.S. Executive Branch officials
Individuals
Richard Ojeda
Individuals
Andrew Yang
Individuals

Primary election polling

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h This individual is not a member of the Democratic Party, but has been the subject of speculation or expressed interest in running under this party.

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