2010 Bosnian general election

General elections were held in Bosnia and Herzegovina on 3 October 2010 for both the Federal government and the two entities.[1]

2010 Bosnia and Herzegovina general election

← 2006 3 October 2010 2014 →

All 42 Seats in the House of Representatives
All 3 members of the Presidency
Turnout56% Increase 3.0pp
  First party Second party Third party
  Zlatko Lagumdžija.jpg Dodik, Milorad, 2010.jpg Sulejman Tihić.jpg
Leader Zlatko Lagumdžija Milorad Dodik Sulejman Tihić
Party SDP BiH SNSD SDA
Last election 5 7 9
Seats won 8 8 7
Seat change Increase 3 Increase 1 Decrease 2
Popular vote 284,435 277,819 214,300

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Mladen Bosic-mc.rs.jpg Fahrudin Radončić.jpg Dragan Čović.jpg
Leader Mladen Bosić Fahrudin Radončić Dragan Čović
Party SDS SBB HDZ BiH
Last election 3 New 3
Seats won 4 4 3
Seat change Increase 1 New Steady
Popular vote 137,844 130,448 114,476

Bosnia and Herzegovina, parliamentary election, 2010.png
Colours denote the party with the most votes by municipalities

Chairman before election

Nikola Špirić
SNSD

Elected Chairman

Vjekoslav Bevanda
HDZ BiH

Voters elected 42 deputies to the State House of Representatives.[2] In the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (FBiH), 98 deputies to its House of Representatives, two representatives (one Bosniak, one Croat) to the tripartite state presidency and ten cantonal assemblies were elected.[2] In Republika Srpska (RS), 83 deputies to its National Assembly, the Serb representative of the tripartite state presidency, one RS president and two RS vice-presidents were elected.[2] There were 39 political parties, 11 coalitions, and 13 independent candidates.[3]

BackgroundEdit

After the Bosnian War and the Dayton Accords that ended the war, the constitution set out, in Article V, a tripartite rotational presidency between the Bosniak, Croat and Serb entities. Each president serves a four-year term, with the chairman of the presidential council rotation every 8 months, with the first president being the one with most votes in the election.[4]

CandidatesEdit

PresidencyEdit

There were three candidates for the Bosniak member of the Presidency: the incumbent Haris Silajdžić, of Party for Bosnia and Herzegovina, the owner of Dnevni Avaz Fahrudin Radončić, of Union for a Better Future of BiH and Bakir Izetbegović of the Party of Democratic Action and the son of Alija Izetbegović, the founding president of Bosnia and Herzegovina.[5]

The Croat candidate was: incumbent Željko Komšić from Social Democratic Party of Bosnia and Herzegovina, who was elected in 2006 when large numbers of Bosniaks voted for him rather than voting for a Bosniak candidate.[5]

The Serb candidate was: incumbent Nebojša Radmanović of the Alliance of Independent Social Democrats, who was expected to win.[5]

CampaignEdit

Following the International Court of Justice's opinion that Kosovo's declaration of independence did not violate international law Republika Srpska's Prime Minister Milorad Dodik said there would be repercussions in Bosnia and Herzegovina and that the issue would be discussed in depth after the elections.[6] During his campaign Dodik reiterated support for the secession of Republika Srpska from Bosnia and Herzegovina and denied that the massacre in Srebrenica constituted a genocide.[7] Boris Tadić, president of Serbia, expressed his support for Dodik, Tadić stated that he was "here to support my friends who run RS in the best possible way".[8][9] He was later criticised by the SDA for supporting "a man who openly denies genocide in Srebrenica and calls for secession of Republika Srpska."[8]

The Croat and Bosniak candidates were "strong supporters of a unified Bosnia," while Serb candidate advocated the separation of the Bosnian Serbs entity from the rest of the country.[10] Dodik asserted that "Only the Serb Republic is self-sustaining, Bosnia-Herzegovina is not." He had a "strategic partnership" with the Croat nationalist Dragan Čović to support each other's calls for greater independence or autonomy as the Croatian side advocated. The Bosniaks, however, said would fight for a united Bosnia, and sought a stronger federal government - a key condition for European Union membership.[11]

These polls were described as the most crucial since the civil war as a lot of campaigning focused on ethnic nationalism and voting for candidates of the same ethnicity. One political analyst, compared this campaign to that of 1990, before the partition of Yugoslavia, when Bosnia had the choice of becoming a part of greater Serbia or an independent multi-ethnic country pointed out that "for exactly 20 years we have been spinning around in the same political pattern."[4]

The official campaign started on 3 September, and lasted for next 30 days. Hate speech in the election campaign in BiH has become a normal occurrence. Because of that, Central Election Commission announced that they will not tolerate any form of hate speech.[12] Nervousness of political parties was manifested through the violation of the Election Law of BiH,[12] and particularly through the manipulation of so-called public opinion research and publication in the form of paid advertising. The first phase of the media war waged mainly through portals and news releases.

The campaign was significant because politicians were allowed to "use all their weapons" in publicity. Experts stated that this campaign was something new in Bosnia and Herzegovina because it was creative as opposed to the earlier campaigns.[12]

  • Our Party (NS) - Election campaign of the coalition of the Our Party nad New Socialist Party - Zdravko Kršmanović started on 3 September by laying a wreath at the memorial area of Donja Gradina, at the Jasenovac concentration camp.
  • Serbian Democratic Party (SDS) - They started their election campaign with advertisements and election rallies in Banja Luka.
  • Alliance of Independent Social Democrats (SNSD) - SNSD started election campaign at noon of 3 September on Squer of Krajina in Banja Luka with simbolic sticking of their first propaganda poster. President of the SNSD and candidat for president of Republika Srpska Milorad Dodik and president of Executive Board of SNSD and candidate for member of Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina Nebojša Radmanović had stick that first propaganda poster.
  • Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina (HDZBiH) - President of the party, prof. dr. sc. Dragan Čović hung out with the most socially vulnerable members of population. He stated that his party wants to emphasize the social care for people of Bosnia and Herzegovina, especially between Croats. Candidate for memeer of Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina Borjana Krišto started her official campaign on 3 September from her birth town Livno. In the morning she laid a wreath at the Memorial Center in the Donji Rujani, and at noon she addressed to the citizens at King Tomislav's Square in Livno, then she hung out with the assembled multitude. At the presence of many citizens, friends and members of her family she stated that her start of election campaign is very symbolic because Livno is a Croatian town that "never lost a single battle". She also added that she will come back victorious and "...announce victory of the Croatian people."
  • Union for a Better Future of BiH (SBB BiH) - At the first they of election campaign, supporters and sympathizers of the party had met at the Iftar in Gradačac. At this meeting they stated that they will win the elections because they will "probably win those who gaved fake hope to the people previous years". About 600 fasting persons welcomed the party's president and candidate for Bosniak member of the Presidency, Fahrudin Radončić. Large number of syphatizers waited Radončić at the entrance of "Europrof", where they later continued with Iftar.
  • Croatian Party of Rights - Candidate for Prime Minister of Herzegovina-Neretva Canton Živko Budmimir had opened his Election Campaign at midnight of 3 September. He talked to the police representatives and tour to the police patrols. Professor Petar Milić, president of the Main Department of Croatian Party of Rights of Bosnia and Herzegovina and candidate of Coalition of Croatian Democratic Union 1990 and Croatian Party of Rights for House of Representatives of Parliament of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina started his campaign with the most sensitive part of Croats - the exiles.

Opinion pollsEdit

Opinion polls suggested Dodik's "Alliance of Independent Social Democrats" would remain the largest Serb party, as well as the country as a whole. The "Social Democratic Party" of Zlatko Lagumdžija would be the largest party in the federation, followed by the "Party of Democratic Action."[11]

An analyst at the "Why not?" NGO in Sarajevo suggested the elections importance was because "change will finally happen [...] because the ones who are in power now have proved they are not capable of leading the country and bringing the necessary reforms. Civil society has been very active about these elections and we hope this will have an impact." She said that if there were changes in the establishment ethnic relations would not be as tense.[11] An August 2010 survey of 2,000 respondents by the National Democratic Institute. suggested that voters on both sides are tired of nationalist rhetoric and pessimistic about the future of Bosnia.[13] 87 percent felt that nationalist parties are leading the country in the wrong direction.[13] Respondents said politicians discussed nationalist issues too much, while employment and economic issues were not discussed enough.[13] They thought that the biggest issue was unemployment, followed by corruption and crime.[13]

ResultsEdit

In total, 3,126,599 citizens registered to vote.[2] There were 5,276 polling centres: 4,981 regular, 145 for voting in absentia, 143 for voting in person and 7 at Bosnian embassies abroad.[3] There were also 1,200 observers, including 485 international observers.[11]

The Central Electoral Commission of Bosnia and Herzegovina ordered a recount of 66,138 votes that were declared void.[14] This could change the victory of Nebojša Radmanović, candidate of the Alliance of Independent Social Democrats (SNSD), who won the Serb seat of the central presidency by a narrow margin of 9,697.[14] Mladen Ivanić of the Party of Democratic Progress (PDP) lost by less than two percent.[14]

PresidencyEdit

Candidate Party Votes %
Bosniak member
Bakir Izetbegović Party of Democratic Action 162,831 34.86
Fahrudin Radončić Union for a Better Future of BiH 142,387 30.49
Haris Silajdžić Party for Bosnia and Herzegovina 117,240 25.10
Ibrahim Đedović Democratic People's Union 13,369 2.86
Mujo Demirović Bosnian-Herzegovinian Patriotic Party-Sefer Halilović 8,951 1.92
Ðemal Latić Party of Democratic Activity 8,738 1.87
Ibrahim Spahić Civic Democratic Party 6,948 1.49
Izudin Kešetović Bosnian Party 4,228 0.91
Aida Jusić Independent 2,347 0.50
Croat member
Željko Komšić Social Democratic Party 337,065 60.61
Borjana Krišto Croatian Democratic Union 109,758 19.74
Martin Raguž Croatian Coalition 60,266 10.84
Jerko Ivanković-Lijanović People's Party Work for Betterment 45,397 8.16
Pero Galić Independent 1,581 0.28
Mile Kutle Independent 1,069 0.19
Ferdo Galić Independent 975 0.18
Serb member
Nebojša Radmanović Alliance of Independent Social Democrats 295,629 48.92
Mladen Ivanić Together for Srpska (PDP-SDS) 285,951 47.31
Rajko Papović Union for a Democratic Srpska 22,790 3.77
Invalid/blank votes 141,053
Total 1,768,573 100
Registered voters/turnout 3,126,599 56.56
Source: CEC

House of RepresentativesEdit

Party Federation Republika Srpska Total
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats +/–
Social Democratic Party 266,023 26.07 8 18,412 2.96 0 284,435 17.33 8 +3
Alliance of Independent Social Democrats 8,810 0.86 0 269,009 43.30 8 277,819 16.92 8 +1
Party of Democratic Action 197,922 19.40 7 16,378 2.64 0 214,300 13.05 7 –2
Serb Democratic Party 137,844 22.19 4 137,844 8.40 4 +1
Union for a Better Future of BiH 124,114 12.16 4 6,334 1.02 0 130,448 7.95 4 New
Croatian Democratic Union 112,115 10.99 3 2,361 0.38 0 114,476 6.97 3 0
Party for Bosnia and Herzegovina 74,004 7.25 2 12,665 2.04 0 86,669 5.28 2 –6
Croatian Coalition 49,549 4.86 2 522 0.08 0 50,071 3.05 2 0
People's Party for Work and Betterment 49,050 4.81 1 49,050 2.99 1 0
Party of Democratic Progress 40,070 6.45 1 40,070 2.44 1 0
Democratic People's Alliance 1,147 0.11 0 28,511 4.59 1 29,658 1.81 1 0
Bosnian-Herzegovinian Patriotic Party 28,102 2.57 0 602 0.10 0 28,704 1.75 0 –1
Bosnian Party 19,224 1.88 0 217 0.03 0 19,441 1.18 0 0
Our Party–New Socialist Party 11,917 1.17 0 7,518 1.21 0 19,435 1.18 0 New
Party of Democratic Activity 17,634 1.73 0 371 0.06 0 18,005 1.10 0 New
Democratic People's Union 14,843 1.45 1 310 0.05 0 15,153 0.92 1 0
Democratic Party 15,057 2.42 0 15,057 0.92 0 New
Socialist Party 14,573 2.35 0 14,573 0.89 0 0
SRS "Dr. Vojislav Šešelj" 14,320 2.30 0 14,320 0.87 0 0
Party of the Penniless People 11,462 1.12 0 237 0.04 0 11,699 0.71 0 New
Pensioners' Party 11,158 1.09 0 11,158 0.68 0 0
Serbian Radical Party 10,483 1.69 0 10,483 0.64 0 0
Serbian Progressive Party 8,636 1.39 0 8,636 0.53 0 0
Social Democratic Union 8,603 0.84 0 152 0.02 0 8,755 0.53 0 0
Croatian Peasant Party 3,522 0.35 0 4,574 0.74 0 8,096 0.49 0 New
National Democratic Party 6,692 1.08 0 6,692 0.41 0 0
Alliance for Srpska Democracy 4,911 0.79 0 4,911 0.30 0 New
Democratic Party of Invalids 3,577 0.35 0 47 0.01 0 3,624 0.22 0 0
Party for the People 3,174 0.31 0 3,174 0.19 0 New
Turnaround Coalition (GDS–NEP) 2,053 0.20 0 398 0.06 0 2,451 0.15 0 0
LDS–EES E-5 2,290 0.22 0 15 0.00 0 2,305 0.14 0 0
Independents 57 0.01 0 57 0.00 0 New
Invalid/blank votes 78,009 49,669 127,678
Total 1,098,302 100 28 670,945 100 14 1,769,247 100 42 0
Registered voters/turnout
Source: CEC

House of PeoplesEdit

The 15 members of the House of Peoples was elected following the elections by the parliaments of the two entities – 10 members by the House of Representatives of the Parliament of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (5 Bosniaks and 5 Croats); and 5 members by the National Assembly of the Republika Srpska.

Federation of Bosnia and HerzegovinaEdit

In the Federation this includes:

House of Representatives of the Federation of Bosnia and HerzegovinaEdit

Only parties which have won mandates are listed:

Party Votes Reg. Com. Total
  Social Democratic Party (SDP) 251,053 20 8 28
  Party of Democratic Action (SDA) 206,926 17 6 23
  Union for a Better Future of BiH (SBB BiH) 121,697 11 2 13
  Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina (HDZ) 108,943 10 2 12
  Party for Bosnia and Herzegovina (Za BiH) 78,086 8 1 9
  People's Party Work for Betterment 48,286 - 5 5
  Croatian Democratic Union 1990 (HDZ1990)/Croatian Party of Right 47,941 4 1 5
  Party of Democratic Activity (A-SDA) 19,254 1 - 1
  Democratic People's Community 15,082 1 - 1
  Alliance of Independent Social Democrats 9,505 1 - 1

Reg. - Mandates from regional electoral units; Com. - Mandates from compensation lists
Source - Central Electoral Commission of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Canton ParliamentsEdit

All 289 seats in the assemblies of the cantons of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina were up for election (Bosnian: skupština kantona, Croatian: sabor županije, Serbian Cyrillic: скупштина кантона).

Source - Central Electoral Commission of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Party  
USK
 
PK
 
TK
 
ZDK
 
BPK
 
SBK
 
HNK
 
ZHK
 
KS
 
K10
Total +/-
  Party of Democratic Action (SDA) 7 2 10 10 6 6 5 - 7 2 55 -19
  Party for Bosnia and Herzegovina (Za BiH) 3 1 3 4 4 2 2 - 4 - 23 -36
  Social Democratic Party (SDP) 8 1 13 10 7 6 5 - 10 1 61 +18
  Union for a Better Future of BiH (SBB BiH) 2 1 4 5 3 4 3 - 7 - 29 -
  Croatian Democratic Union BiH (HDZ BiH) - 8 1 2 - 7 10 13 - 7 48 +12
  Croatian Democratic Union 1990 (HDZ1990) - 5 - - - 2 3 4 - 4 18 -11
  Croatian Party of Right/New Croatian Initiative - 2 - - - 1 1 3 - 4 11 -3
  People's Party Work for Betterment 2 - 2 3 3 2 1 3 1 3 20 +10
  Bosnian-Herzegovinian Patriotic Party (BPS) - - 2 1 2 - - - 2 - 7 -1
  Democratic People's Community (DNZ) 4 - - - - - - - - - 4 -2
  Bosnian Party/Social Democratic Union (BOSS/SDU) - - - - - - - - 2 - 2 -3
  Union of Independent Social Democrats (SNSD) - - - - - - - - - 3 3 -2
  Party of Democratic Activity (A-SDA) 4 - - - - - - - - - 4 ?
  Posavina Party (PS) - 1 - - - - - - - - 1 ?
  Our Party (NS) - - - - - - - - 2 - 2 ?
  Democratic People's Alliance - - - - - - - - - 1 1 ?
  Total 30 21 35 35 25 30 30 23 35 25    

Republika SrpskaEdit

ReactionsEdit

Štefan Füle, European commissioner for enlargement and neighbourhood policy, urged Bosnian politicians to speed up the establishment of State and Entity governments using the EU agenda as a negotiation base for coalition building. Füle underlined the need for constitutional amendments to ensure compliance with the European Convention on Human Rights and improve governance, for a new Census Law to provide reliable statistical data, and for the establishment of an independent state aid authority.[15]

The US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visited Bosnia and Herzegovina a week after the elections in an effort to push for political reforms to fully integration the entry into both the European Union and NATO. She also called for unity and criticised threats of secession of Srpska made by Milorad Dodik.[16] A US diplomat in Europe said he thought the reforms are necessary and that "the Bosnians need to follow up. The rest of the region is moving towards Europe, and Bosnia is going to have to overcome these ethnic divisions [...] if they want to go down this path."[17]

In the international media, the election was read as seeing the country "still mired in political deadlock and ethnic rivalry," because of a continued political stalemate that leaves the unique tripartite presidency split over the future of the country. This also meant a likelihood of a delayed economic recovery and the accession of Bosnia and Herzegovina to the European Union.[18]

AnalysisEdit

 
Komšić's 2010 election results by municipality expressed as a percentage of total valid votes for each municipality. Note that the Bosniak and Croat members of the Presidency are elected from the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina entity, while the Serb member is elected from the Republika Srpska entity (greyed out on the map).

Many officials of the Croatian Democratic Union party have claimed that the re-election of Željko Komšić (SDP) as the Croat member of the presidency was due to Bosniaks choosing to vote on the Croat list.[19][20][21] Bulk of the votes Komšić received came from predominantly Bosniak areas and he fared quite poorly in Croat municipalities, supported by less than 2,5% of the electorate in a number of municipalities in Western Herzegovina, such as Široki Brijeg, Ljubuški (0,8%), Čitluk, Posušje and Tomislavgrad, while not being able to gain not even 10% in a number of others.[22] Furthermore, total Croat population in whole of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina is estimated around 495,000;[23] Komšić received 336,961 votes alone, while all other Croat candidates won 230,000 votes altogether. Croats of Bosnia and Herzegovina consider him to be an illegitimate representative and generally treat him as a second Bosniak member of the presidency.[24][25][26][27] This raised frustration among Croats, undermined their trust in federal institutions and empowered claims for their own entity or a federal unit, while opening so-called "Croatian question".[28]

The Social Democratic Party of Bosnia and Herzegovina of Zlatko Lagumdzija appeared to be the biggest winner of the election, while the Party of Democratic Action contained their expected losses, while the Party for Bosnia and Herzegovina of Haris Silajdzic lost ground. The Party of Independent Social Democrats of Milorad Dodik strengthened its presence in both Republika Srpska and at state level. None of the newly established parties, with the exception of Fahrudin Radončić's Union for a Better Future of BiH were able to pass the threshold and gain seats in either of the parliamentary bodies.[15] Two blocs can therefore be noticed at state level: the Party of Independent Social Democrats|SNSD and Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina on one side and the Social Democratic Party of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Party of Democratic Action on the other. The negotiations to form a new government at both Federation and State level are expected to take some time.[15]

In Republika Srpska Dodik secured a stable majority, and his election as Entity President will likely signal a trend of presidentialisation of Srpska's political system, in line with what happened in Serbia after Tadic's presidential election.[15][clarification needed]

AftermathEdit

At the federal level, the formation of government is currently ongoing. There are two major coalitions which have been formed since the election: Social Democratic Party of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Party of Democratic Action, Croatian Party of Rights and People's Party Work for Betterment; and a looser grouping of the Alliance of Independent Social Democrats, Serbian Democratic Party, Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Croatian Democratic Union-1990.[citation needed] Neither group has a parliamentary majority, nor do they have full representation from the three constitutional peoples.[original research?]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "BiH to hold general elections on October 3rd". Southeast European Times. 6 May 2010.
  2. ^ a b c d "INTERIM REPORT No.1 26 August – 13 September 2010" (PDF). OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights. 21 September 2010.
  3. ^ a b "2010 GENERAL ELECTIONS" (PDF). Central Electoral Commission of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 October 2010.
  4. ^ a b "Bosnians vote in crucial elections". Al Jazeera. 3 October 2010.
  5. ^ a b c "News Analysis: Few surprises expected in Bosnian general elections". Xinhua News Agency. 3 October 2010.
  6. ^ "RS: ICJ decision and secession". B92. 25 July 2010. Archived from the original on 8 June 2011. Retrieved 25 July 2010.
  7. ^ "Nationalism High, Hopes Low in Bosnia Election". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 1 October 2010.
  8. ^ a b Arslanagic, Sabina (30 September 2010). "Serbian President Publicly Backs Dodik Campaign". Balkan Insight.
  9. ^ "Tadic supports SNSD candidates ahead of elections in BiH". Tanjug. 30 September 2010.
  10. ^ Cerkez, Aida (3 October 2010). "Preliminary results show Bosnians divided on vote". Associated Press.
  11. ^ a b c d "Polls close in Bosnia election". Al Jazeera. 3 October 2010.
  12. ^ a b c Tomić, Zoran (2010). Izborna kampanja u BiH: kako dobiti nešto za ništa. Archived from the original on 17 December 2010. Retrieved 1 January 2011.
  13. ^ a b c d "Public Opinion Poll Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) August 2010" (PDF). National Democratic Institute. Retrieved 27 August 2010.
  14. ^ a b c "Bosnia: Ballot Recount Could Change Race for Top Post". Balkan Insight. 21 October 2010.
  15. ^ a b c d EU Observer, 6 December 2010
  16. ^ "Troubleshooting in the western Balkans: Outsiders needed". The Economist. 14 October 2010.
  17. ^ "Clinton calls for reforms in Bosnia". Al Jazeera. 12 October 2010.
  18. ^ Shaikh, Thair (7 October 2010). "Bosnia and Herzegovina still divided 15 years after war". CNN.
  19. ^ "Prvi službeni rezultati BiH izbora: u Predsjedništvu Izetbegović, Radmanović i Komšić". Slobodna Dalmacija. 3 October 2010.
  20. ^ "Bosnia Polls Results: Bosniaks Vote for Change". Balkan Insight. 4 October 2010.
  21. ^ "Nadmoć SNSD u RS, težak poraz Silajdžića". Blic. 5 October 2010.
  22. ^ Central Electorate Commission, results in municipalities, 2010
  23. ^ U BiH ima 48,4 posto Bošnjaka, 32,7 posto Srba i 14, 6 posto Hrvata (Article on the preliminary report of 2013 census) Archived 31 July 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  24. ^ International Crisis Group: Bosnia’s Future Europe, Report N°232[permanent dead link], 10 July 2014
  25. ^ Vogel, T. K. (9 October 2006). "Bosnia: From the Killing Fields to the Ballot Box". The Globalist. Archived from the original on 10 October 2009. Retrieved 30 July 2012.
  26. ^ Pavić, Snježana (8 October 2010). "Nije točno da Hrvati nisu glasali za Željka Komšića, u Grudama je dobio 124 glasa". Jutarnji list (in Croatian). Retrieved 6 April 2013.
  27. ^ "Reforma Federacije uvod je u reformu izbornog procesa" (in Croatian). Dnevno. 13 May 2013. Archived from the original on 4 December 2013. Retrieved 13 May 2013.
  28. ^ Luka Oreskovic: "Doing Away with Et Cetera", Foreign Policy. 30 October 2013

External linksEdit