Vladimir Smirnov (skier)

Vladimir Mikhaylovich Smirnov (Russian: Влади́мир Миха́йлович Смирно́в; born 7 March 1964) is a Kazakhstani former cross-country skier who raced from the 1982 until 1991 for the USSR and, later, for Kazakhstan. He is the first Olympic champion from independent Kazakhstan and the most decorated Olympian in history of Kazakhstan. He is also a vice president of the International Biathlon Union. Smirnov is a former member of International Olympic Committee.[2]

Vladimir Smirnov
Vladimir Smirnov (skier) 2007 Kazakhstani stamp.jpg
Country Kazakhstan
 Sweden[1]
Full nameVladimir Mikhaylovich Smirnov
Born (1964-03-07) 7 March 1964 (age 56)
Shuchinsk, Kazakh SSR, Soviet Union
Height1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Ski clubStockviks SF
World Cup career
Seasons19831998
Individual wins30
Team wins2
Indiv. podiums66
Team podiums8
Indiv. starts132
Team starts14
Overall titles2 – (1991, 1994)
Discipline titles0

Early lifeEdit

Smirnov was born in Shchuchinsk, Kazakh SSR. During the Soviet period, he trained at the Armed Forces sports society in Alma-Ata.

CareerEdit

 
Smirnov in 1994

Smirnov made his debut in the FIS Cross-Country World Cup on 18 December 1982 at Davos in a 15 km race, finishing in a 17th place. His first victory came in 1986, a classic style 15 km in Kavgolovo (URS). Smirnov gained a total of 30 victories in the World Cup, with 21 second and 15 third places. In 1994, he won the aggregate World Cup, thanks to seven victories in the course of the season.

At the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships from 1987 to 1997, Smirnov totalled four gold (1989: 30 km, 1995: 10 km, 10 km + 15 km combined pursuit, 30 km), four silver (1987: 4x10 km, 1991: 30 km, 1993: 10 km, 10 km + 15 km combined pursuit) and three bronze medals (1991: 15 km, 1993: 30 km, 1995: 50 km). His best result was in Thunder Bay, Ontario (1995), when he won three events.

In 1994, he received the Holmenkollen Medal (shared with Lyubov Yegorova and Espen Bredesen). Smirnov also won twice at the Holmenkollen ski festival with a 15 km win in 1994 and a 50 km win in 1995.

A very regular and effective cross-country skier, especially in long-distance classic style races, Smirnov took part to the Winter Olympics from 1988 to 1998. His best known victory was the 50 km gold medal at the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, the first Olympic gold medal for Kazakhstan. He was one of the leading characters of that Olympics, as his unending rivalry with home ever-winning Bjørn Dæhlie had gained him the affection of the Norwegian audience. He also became good friends with his rival Dæhlie, even participating with Dæhlie in several popular Norwegian TV shows.

In 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics, Smirnov was flag-bearer of Kazakhstan Olympic team and won the bronze medal in the 25 km pursuit event.[2]

Smirnov headed the bid committee to have Almaty, Kazakhstan, host the 2014 Winter Olympics, a bid that failed to make the short list that was announced by the International Olympic Committee on 22 June 2006.[2] In 2011, Smirnov participated at the opening ceremony of 2011 Asian Winter Games in Astana.

Personal lifeEdit

Smirnov moved to Sweden in 1991 and lives in the city of Sundsvall, where he was a co-founder and co-owner of a local brewery. He is married to Valentina Smirnova, and they have two daughters – Anna and Karolina. He became a Swedish citizen in 1998.[1] Smirnov speaks four languages: Russian, German, English and Swedish.[3]

Cross-country skiing resultsEdit

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[4]

Olympic GamesEdit

  • 7 medals – (1 gold, 4 silver, 2 bronze)
 Year   Age   10 km   15 km  Pursuit   30 km  50 km  4 × 10 km 
 relay 
1988 23 N/A Bronze N/A Silver Silver
1992 27 13 N/A 8 9 35 5
1994 29 Silver N/A Silver 10 Gold
1998 33 4 N/A Bronze 12 8

World ChampionshipsEdit

  • 11 medals – (4 gold, 4 silver, 3 bronze)
 Year   Age   10 km  15 km
 classical 
 15 km
 freestyle 
 Pursuit  30 km  50 km  4 × 10 km 
 relay 
1985 20 N/A 16 N/A N/A 6
1987 22 N/A 5 N/A N/A Silver
1989 24 N/A 10 N/A Gold 21 5
1991 26 N/A Bronze N/A Silver 5
1993 28 Silver N/A N/A Silver Bronze 21
1995 30 Gold N/A N/A Gold Gold Bronze
1997 32 4 N/A N/A 8 42 19

World CupEdit

Season titlesEdit

  • 2 titles – (2 overall)
Season
Discipline
1991 Overall
1994 Overall

Season standingsEdit

 Season   Age 
Overall Long Distance Sprint
1983 19 59 N/A N/A
1984 20 31 N/A N/A
1985 21 30 N/A N/A
1986 22   N/A N/A
1987 23 5 N/A N/A
1988 24 5 N/A N/A
1989 25 5 N/A N/A
1990 26 7 N/A N/A
1991 27   N/A N/A
1992 28   N/A N/A
1993 29   N/A N/A
1994 30   N/A N/A
1995 31   N/A N/A
1996 32   N/A N/A
1997 33 9   37
1998 34   4  

Individual podiumsEdit

  • 30 victories
  • 66 podiums
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1  1983–84  23 March 1984   Murmansk, Soviet Union 15 km Individual World Cup 2nd
2  1985–86  8 December 1985   Labrador City, Canada 15 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
3 1 January 1986   La Bresse, France 30 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
4 23 February 1986   Kavgolovo, Soviet Union 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
5  1986–87  13 December 1986   Cogne, Italy 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
6 20 December 1986   Davos, Switzerland 30 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
7 1987–88 9 January 1988   Kavgolovo, Soviet Union 30 km Individual C World Cup 1st
8 15 February 1988   Calgary, Canada 30 km Individual C Olympic Games[1] 2nd
9 19 February 1988   Calgary, Canada 15 km Individual C Olympic Games[1] 3rd
10  1988–89  7 January 1989   Kavgolovo, Soviet Union 15 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
11 18 February 1989   Lahti, Finland 30 km Individual C World Championships[1] 1st
12 1989–90 25 February 1990   Reit im Winkl, West Germany 30 km Individual F World Cup 1st
13 10 March 1990   Örnsköldsvik, Sweden 30 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
14  1990–91  9 December 1990   Tauplitzalm, Austria 10 km + 15 km Individual C/F World Cup 2nd
15 15 December 1990   Davos, Switzerland 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
16 19 December 1990   Les Saisies, France 30 km Individual C World Cup 1st
17 5 January 1991   Minsk, Soviet Union 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
18 7 February 1991   Val di Fiemme, Italy 30 km Individual C World Championships[1] 2nd
19 9 February 1991   Val di Fiemme, Italy 15 km Individual F World Championships[1] 3rd
20 3 March 1991   Lahti, Finland 30 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
21  1991–92  7 December 1991   Silver Star, Canada 10 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
22 4 January 1992   Kavgolovo, Russia 30 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
23 7 March 1992   Funäsdalen, Sweden 30 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
24  1992–93  12 December 1992   Ramsau, Austria 10 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
25 13 December 1992   Ramsau, Austria 15 km Pursuit C World Cup 3rd
26 18 December 1992   Val di Fiemme, Italy 30 km Individual F World Cup 1st
27 16 January 1993   Bohinj, Slovenia 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
28 20 February 1993   Falun, Sweden 30 km Individual C World Championships[1] 3rd
29 22 February 1993   Falun, Sweden 10 km Individual C World Championships[1] 2nd
30 24 February 1993   Falun, Sweden 15 km Pursuit F World Championships[1] 2nd
31 7 March 1993   Lahti, Finland 30 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
32 1993–94 11 December 1993   Santa Caterina, Italy 30 km Individual C World Cup 1st
33 21 December 1993   Toblach, Italy 10 km Individual C World Cup 1st
34 21 December 1993   Toblach, Italy 15 km Pursuit F World Cup 1st
35 9 January 1994   Kavgolovo, Russia 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
36 15 January 1994   Oslo, Norway 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
37 17 February 1994   Lillehammer, Norway 10 km Individual C Olympic Games[1] 2nd
38 19 February 1994   Lillehammer, Norway 15 km Pursuit F Olympic Games[1] 2nd
39 27 February 1994   Lillehammer, Norway 50 km Individual C Olympic Games[1] 1st
40 5 March 1994   Lahti, Finland 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
41  1994–95  27 November 1994   Kiruna, Sweden 10 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
42 20 December 1994   Sappada, Italy 10 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
43 27 January 1995   Lahti, Finland 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
44 29 January 1995   Lahti, Finland 15 km Pursuit C World Cup 1st
45 4 February 1995   Falun, Sweden 30 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
46 11 February 1995   Oslo, Norway 50 km Individual C World Cup 1st
47 9 March 1995   Thunder Bay, Canada 30 km Individual C World Championships[1] 1st
48 11 March 1995   Thunder Bay, Canada 10 km Individual C World Championships[1] 1st
49 13 March 1995   Thunder Bay, Canada 15 km Pursuit F World Championships[1] 1st
50 19 March 1995   Thunder Bay, Canada 50 km Individual F World Championships[1] 3rd
51 25 March 1995   Sapporo, Japan 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
52 1995–96 26 November 1995   Vuokatti, Finland 10 km Individual C World Cup 1st
53 9 December 1995   Davos, Switzerland 30 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
54 13 December 1995   Brusson, Italy 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
55 16 December 1995   Santa Caterina, Italy 10 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
56 17 December 1995   Santa Caterina, Italy 15 km Pursuit F World Cup 3rd
57 9 January 1996   Štrbské Pleso, Slovakia 50 km Individual F World Cup 1st
58 13 January 1996   Nové Město, Czech Republic 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
59 10 February 1996   Kavgolovo, Russia 15 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
60 24 February 1996   Trondheim, Norway 30 km Individual F World Cup 1st
61 9 March 1996   Falun, Sweden 10 km Individual F World Cup 1st
62 10 March 1996   Falun, Sweden 15 km Pursuit C World Cup 1st
63 1996–97 19 January 1997   Lahti, Finland 30 km Individual C World Cup 1st
64  1997–98  22 November 1997   Beitostølen, Norway 10 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
65 13 December 1997   Val di Fiemme, Italy 10 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
66 8 March 1998   Lahti, Finland 30 km Individual C World Cup 1st

Team podiumsEdit

  • 2 victories
  • 8 podiums
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place Teammates
1  1986–87  17 February 1987   Oberstdorf, West Germany 4 × 10 km Relay F World Championships[1] 2nd Batyuk / Devyatyarov / Sakhnov
2  1987–88  24 February 1988   Calgary, Canada 4 × 10 km Relay F Olympic Games[1] 2nd Sakhnov / Devyatyarov / Prokurorov
3  1988–89  5 March 1989   Oslo, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay F World Cup 2nd Badamshin / Sakhnov / Prokurorov
4 12 March 1989   Falun, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay C World Cup 1st Badamshin / Sakhnov / Prokurorov
5  1989–90  1 March 1990   Lahti, Finland 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 2nd Badamshin / Prokurorov / Botvinov
6 16 March 1990   Vang, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay C World Cup 3rd Badamshin / Golubev / Botvinov
7 1991–92 28 February 1992   Lahti, Finland 4 × 10 km Relay F World Cup 1st Kirilov / Botvinov / Prokurorov
8 8 March 1992   Funäsdalen, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay C World Cup 2nd Kirilov / Botvinov / Prokurorov

Note: 1 Until the 1999 World Championships and the 1994 Winter Olympics, World Championship and Olympic races were included in the World Cup scoring system.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Österberg, Tobias (15 December 1998). "Smirre blir svensk". Aftonbladet (in Swedish). Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Vladimir Smirnov. sports-reference.com
  3. ^ Владимир Смирнов: «И после спорта судьба продолжает мне улыбаться». skisport.ru (interview in Russian) 25 October 2008
  4. ^ "SMIRNOV Vladimir". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 22 January 2018.

Further readingEdit

  • Henry, Notaker (1994). Lillehammer 1994: A Fairy-Tale of Images. Oslo: Dreyers Forlag. ISBN 82-504-2145-0.

External linksEdit

Olympic Games
Preceded by
Yermakhan Ibraimov
Flagbearer for   Kazakhstan
Nagano 1998
Succeeded by
Yermakhan Ibraimov