FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1989

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1989 took place 17–26 February 1989 in Lahti, Finland, for a record fifth time (1926, 1938, 1958, 1978). The women's 5 km was not held after being reintroduced in the previous championships. These championships featured separate races of men's 15 km and women's 10 km both in the classical technique and in the freestyle technique. Additionally, the women's 15 km event debuted and the women's 20 km event was lengthened to 30 km.

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1989
Host cityLahti
Country Finland
Events15
Opening ceremony17 February
Closing ceremony26 February
Main venueSalpausselkä
← 1987
1991 →
Official poster for the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1989.

Men's cross-countryEdit

15 km classicalEdit

22 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Harri Kirvesniemi (FIN) 42:40.7
Silver   Pål Gunnar Mikkelsplass (NOR) 42:44.0
Bronze   Vegard Ulvang (NOR) 43:08.4

15 km freestyleEdit

20 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Gunde Svan (SWE) 40:39.6
Silver   Torgny Mogren (SWE) 41:02.9
Bronze   Lars Håland (SWE) 41:10.3

30 km classicalEdit

18 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Vladimir Smirnov (URS) 1:24:56.9
Silver   Vegard Ulvang (NOR) 1:25:03,6
Bronze   Christer Majbäck (SWE) 1:25:09,8

50 km freestyleEdit

26 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Gunde Svan (SWE) 2:15:24.9
Silver   Torgny Mogren (SWE) 2:16:09.2
Bronze   Alexey Prokurorov (URS) 2:16:18.8

4 × 10 km relayEdit

24 February 1989

Medal Team Time
Gold   Sweden (Christer Majbäck, Gunde Svan, Lars Håland, Torgny Mogren) 1:40:12.1
Silver   Finland (Aki Karvonen, Harri Kirvesniemi, Kari Ristanen, Jari Räsänen) 1:40:13.6
Bronze   Czechoslovakia (Ladislav Švanda, Martin Petrásek, Radim Nyč, Václav Korunka) 1:40:13.7

Among the 19 relay teams competing were Australia, Denmark, Greece, and the Netherlands.

Women's cross-countryEdit

10 km classicalEdit

19 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Marja-Liisa Kirvesniemi (FIN) 29:19.0
Silver   Pirkko Määttä (FIN) 30:12.2
Bronze   Marjo Matikainen (FIN) 30:12.9

10 km freestyleEdit

17 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Yelena Välbe (URS) 27:04.5
Silver   Marjo Matikainen (FIN) 27:36.7
Bronze   Tamara Tikhonova (URS) 27:58.8

15 km classicalEdit

21 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Marjo Matikainen (FIN) 47:46.6
Silver   Marja-Liisa Kirvesniemi (FIN) 47:48.6
Bronze   Pirkko Määttä (FIN) 48:20.8

30 km freestyleEdit

25 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Yelena Välbe (URS) 1:29:59.7
Silver   Larisa Lazutina (URS) 1:30:07.7
Bronze   Marjo Matikainen (FIN) 1:30:30.6

4 × 5 km relayEdit

24 February 1989

Medal Team Time
Gold   Finland (Pirkko Määttä, Marja-Liisa Kirvesniemi, Jaana Savolainen, Marjo Matikainen) 54:49.8
Silver   Soviet Union (Yuliya Shamshurina, Raisa Smetanina, Tamara Tikhonova, Yelena Välbe) 54:56.9
Bronze   Norway (Inger Helene Nybråten, Anne Jahren, Nina Skeime, Marianne Dahlmo) 55:52.3

Men's Nordic combinedEdit

15 km individual GundersenEdit

18/19 February 1989

Medal Athlete Time
Gold   Trond Einar Elden (NOR)
Silver   Andrey Dundukov (URS)
Bronze   Trond-Arne Bredesen (NOR)

3 × 10 km teamEdit

23/24 February 1989

Medal Team Time
Gold   Norway (Trond Einar Elden, Trond-Arne Bredesen, Bård Jørgen Elden)
Silver    Switzerland (Andreas Schaad, Hippolyt Kempf, Fredy Glanzmann)
Bronze   East Germany (Ralph Leonhardt, Bernd Blechschmidt, Thomas Abratis)

Men's ski jumpingEdit

Individual normal hillEdit

26 February 1989

Medal Athlete Points
Gold   Jens Weißflog (GDR) 114.5
Silver   Ari-Pekka Nikkola (FIN) 110.5
Bronze   Heinz Kuttin (AUT) 108.5

The event was originally scheduled for 25 February, however, due to adverse weather conditions it was postponed to the following day. Due to strong winds no second round took place and results were taken from the first round.

Individual large hillEdit

20 February 1989

Medal Athlete Points
Gold   Jari Puikkonen (FIN) 218.5
Silver   Jens Weißflog (GDR) 212.5
Bronze   Matti Nykänen (FIN) 205.0

Team large hillEdit

22 February 1989

Medal Team Points
Gold   Finland (Ari-Pekka Nikkola, Jari Puikkonen, Matti Nykänen, Risto Laakkonen) 645.0
Silver   Norway (Magne Johansen, Clas Brede Bråthen, Ole Gunnar Fidjestøl, Jon Inge Kjørum) 626.0
Bronze   Czechoslovakia (Jiří Parma, Martin Švagerko, Ladislav Dluhoš, Pavel Ploc) 595.5

Medal tableEdit

Medal winners by nation.

  *   Host nation (Finland)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Finland (FIN)*65415
2  Soviet Union (URS)3328
3  Sweden (SWE)3227
4  Norway (NOR)2338
5  East Germany (GDR)1113
6   Switzerland (SUI)0101
7  Czechoslovakia (TCH)0022
8  Austria (AUT)0011
Totals (8 nations)15151545


ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit