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Pilgrims circumambulating the Kaaba, in Mecca (Hijazi region of Saudi Arabia) during the Hajj

The ʿUmrah (Arabic: عُمرَة‎‎) is an Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, Hijaz, Saudi Arabia, performed by Muslims that can be undertaken at any time of the year, in contrast to the Ḥajj (Arabic: حَـجّ‎‎) which has specific dates according to the Islamic lunar calendar. In Arabic, ‘Umrah means "to visit a populated place." In the Sharia, Umrah means to perform Tawaf round the Ka‘bah (Arabic: كَـعْـبَـة‎‎, 'Cube'), and Sa'i between Safa and Marwah, both after assuming Ihram (a sacred state). Ihram must be observed once traveling by land and passing a Miqat like Zu 'l-Hulafa, Juhfa, Qarnu 'l-Manāzil, Yalamlam, Zāt-i-'Irq, Ibrahīm Mursīa, or a place in al-Hill. Different conditions exist for air travelers, who must observe Ihram once entering a specific perimeter about the city of Mecca. It is sometimes called the 'minor pilgrimage' or 'lesser pilgrimage', the Hajj being the 'major' pilgrimage which is compulsory for every able-bodied Muslim who can afford it. The Umrah is not compulsory but highly recommended.

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Differences between the Hajj and UmrahEdit

  • Both are Islamic pilgrimages, the main difference is their level of importance and the method of observance.[1]
  • Hajj is one of the five pillars of Islam. It is obligatory for every Muslim once in their lifetime, provided they are physically fit and financially capable.
  • Hajj is performed over specific days during a designated Islamic month. However, Umrah can be performed at any time.
  • Although they share common rites, Umrah can be performed in less than a few hours while Hajj is more time consuming, and involves more rituals.

Types of UmrahEdit

A certain type of the Umrah exists depending on whether or not the pilgrim wishes to perform Umrah in the Hajj period, thus combining their merit.

When performed alongside the Hajj, Umrah is deemed one of “enjoyment” (Umrat al-tamattu) and is part of a fuller Hajj of enjoyment (Hajjul tamattu). More precisely, the rituals of the Umrah are performed first, and then the Hajj rituals are performed.

Otherwise, when performed without continuing to perform Hajj, the Umrah is considered a “single” Umrah (Umrah Mufradah).

RitualsEdit

The pilgrim performs a series of ritual acts symbolic of the lives of Ibrahim (Abraham) and his second wife Hajar, and of solidarity with Muslims worldwide. Pilgrims enter the perimeter of Mecca in a state of Ihram and perform:

  • Tawaf (Arabic: طواف‎‎), which consists of circling the Ka'bah seven times in an anticlockwise direction. Men are encouraged to do this three times at a hurried pace, followed by four times, more closely, at a leisurely pace.[2]
  • Sa'i (Arabic: سعي‎‎), which means rapidly walking seven times back and forth between the hills of Safa and Marwah. This is a re-enactment of Hajar's frantic search for water. The baby Ishmael cried and hit the ground with his foot (some versions of the story say that an angel scraped his foot or the tip of his wing along the ground), and water miraculously sprang forth. This source of water is today called the Well of Zamzam.
  • Halq or taqsir: Taqsir is a partial shortening of the hair typically reserved for women who cut a minimum of one inch or more of their hair. A halq is a complete shave of the head, usually performed on men. Both of these signify the submission of will to God over glorifying physical appearances. The head shaving/cutting is reserved until the end of Umrah.

These rituals complete the Umrah, and the pilgrim can choose to go out of ihram. Although not a part of the ritual, most pilgrims drink water from the Well of Zamzam. Various sects of Islam perform these rituals with slightly different methods.

The peak times of pilgrimage are the days before, during and after the Hajj and during the last ten days of Ramadan.

HistoryEdit

Access to the Holy Site, and thus the right to practice the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages have not always been granted to Muslims. Throughout Muhammad's era, the Muslims wanted to establish the right to perform Umrah and Hajj since the latter had been prescribed by the Quran. During that time, Mecca was occupied by Arab Pagans who used to worship idols inside Mecca.[3][4]

The Treaty of HudaibiyaEdit

In the early days of Islam, tensions arose in Mecca between its pagan inhabitants and the Muslims who wished to perform pilgrimages within. In 628 AD (6 AH), inspired by a dream that Muhammad had had while in Madinah, in which he was performing the ceremonies of Umrah, he and his followers approached Mecca from Medina. They were stopped at Hudaibiya, Quraysh (a local tribe) refused entry to the Muslims who wished to perform the pilgrimage. Muhammad is said to have explained that they only wished to perform a pilgrimage, and subsequently leave the city, however the Qurayshites disagreed.[5][6][7]

Diplomatic negotiations were pursued once the Prophet Muhammad refused to use force to enter Mecca, out of respect to the Holy Ka’aba.[8] In March, 628 AD (Dhu'l-Qi'dah, 6 AH), the Treaty of Hudaybiyyah was drawn up and signed, with terms stipulating a ten-year period free of hostilities, during which the Muslims would be allowed a three-day-long access per year to the holy site of the Ka’aba starting the following year. On the year it was signed, the followers of Mohammed were forced to return home without having performed Umrah.[9][10]

The First UmrahEdit

The next year (629 AD, or 7 AH), Muhammad ordered and took part in the almost entirely peaceful Conquest of Mecca in December 629.[11][12] Following the agreed-upon terms of the Hudaibiya Treaty, Muhammad and some 2000 followers (men, women and children) proceeded to perform what became the first Umrah, which lasted three days. After the conquest, the people of Makkah who had persecuted and driven away the early Muslims, and had fought against the Muslims due to their beliefs, were afraid of retribution. However, Muhammad forgave even the most ardent of enemies of Islam to establish safe sanctuary in their homes. This was a significant moment where Muhammad showed mercy as opposed to revenge to the people of Makkah. Thus, the right to perform Umrah and Hajj were guaranteed.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gannon, Martin Joseph; Baxter, Ian W. F.; Collinson, Elaine; Curran, Ross; Farrington, Thomas; Glasgow, Steven; Godsman, Elliot M.; Gori, Keith; Jack, Gordon R. A. (2017-06-11). "Travelling for Umrah: destination attributes, destination image, and post-travel intentions". The Service Industries Journal. 37 (7-8): 448–465. ISSN 0264-2069. doi:10.1080/02642069.2017.1333601. 
  2. ^ Mohamed, Mamdouh N. (1996). Hajj to Umrah: From A to Z. Amana Publications. ISBN 0-915957-54-X. 
  3. ^ Hawting, G. R. (1980). "The Disappearance and Rediscovery of Zamzam and the 'Well of the Ka'ba'". Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. 43 (1): 44–54 (44). JSTOR 616125. doi:10.1017/S0041977X00110523 (inactive 2017-01-18). 
  4. ^ Islamic World, p. 20
  5. ^ Sa'd, Ibn (1967). Kitab al-tabaqat al-kabir,By Ibn Sa'd,Volume 2. Pakistan Historical Society. p. 164. ASIN B0007JAWMK. THE SARIYYAH OF ABO QATADAH IBN RIB'I AL- ANSARl TOWORDS BATN IDAM. 
  6. ^ Sahih Muslim, 43:7176
  7. ^ Ibn Kathir, Muhammad Saed Abdul-Rahman (translator) (November 2009). Tafsir Ibn Kathir Juz' 5 (Part 5): An-Nisaa 24 to An-Nisaa 147 2nd Edition. p. 94. ISBN 9781861796851. 
  8. ^ "The Event Of Hudaybiyyah". Al-islam.org. Retrieved 12 August 2017. 
  9. ^ Mubarakpuri, The Sealed Nectar, pp. 214-215.
  10. ^ Emory C. Bogle (1998), Islam: origin and belief, University of Texas Press, p. 19.
  11. ^ Abu Khalil, Shawqi (1 March 2004). Atlas of the Prophet's biography: places, nations, landmarks. Dar-us-Salam. p. 218. ISBN 978-9960897714.  Note: 6th Month, 8AH = September 629
  12. ^ Sa'd, Ibn (1967). Kitab al-tabaqat al-kabir,By Ibn Sa'd,Volume 2. Pakistan Historical Society. pp. 165–174. ASIN B0007JAWMK. 

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