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Tokyo Ghoul (Japanese: 東京喰種トーキョーグール, Hepburn: Tōkyō Gūru) is a Japanese dark fantasy manga series written and illustrated by Sui Ishida. It was serialized in Shueisha's seinen manga magazine Weekly Young Jump between September 2011 and September 2014, and it has been collected in fourteen tankōbon volumes as of August 2014. A sequel titled Tokyo Ghoul:re was serialized in the same magazine between October 2014 and July 2018, and was later collected into sixteen tankōbon volumes. A prequel titled Tokyo Ghoul [Jack] ran online on Jump Live.

Tokyo Ghoul
Tokyo Ghoul volume 1 cover.jpg
Cover of Tokyo Ghoul volume 1 published by Shueisha featuring Ken Kaneki
東京喰種トーキョーグール
(Tōkyō Gūru)
Genre Dark fantasy,[1] horror, thriller[2]
Manga
Written by Sui Ishida
Published by Shueisha
English publisher
Demographic Seinen
Magazine Weekly Young Jump
Original run September 8, 2011September 18, 2014
Volumes 14 (List of volumes)
Light novel
Written by Shin Towada
Illustrated by Sui Ishida
Published by Shueisha
English publisher
Demographic Male
Magazine JUMP j-BOOKS
Original run July 19, 2013December 19, 2014
Volumes 3 (List of volumes)
Manga
Tokyo Ghoul [Jack]
Written by Sui Ishida
Published by Shueisha
English publisher
Demographic Shōnen
Magazine Jump Live
Original run August 2013October 2013
Volumes 1 (List of volumes)
Anime television series
Directed by Shuhei Morita
Written by Chūji Mikasano
Music by Yutaka Yamada
Studio Pierrot
Licensed by
Original network Tokyo MX, TV Aichi, TVQ, TVO, AT-X, Dlife
English network
Original run July 4, 2014 September 19, 2014
Episodes 12 (List of episodes)
Manga
Tokyo Ghoul:re
Written by Sui Ishida
Published by Shueisha
English publisher
Demographic Seinen
Magazine Weekly Young Jump
Original run October 16, 2014July 5, 2018
Volumes 16 (List of volumes)
Anime television series
Tokyo Ghoul √A
Directed by Shuhei Morita
Written by Chūji Mikasano
Music by Yutaka Yamada
Studio Pierrot
Licensed by
Original network Tokyo MX, TV Aichi, TVQ, TVO, AT-X, Dlife, MRO
English network
Original run January 9, 2015 March 27, 2015
Episodes 12 (List of episodes)
Original video animation
Tokyo Ghoul [Jack]
Directed by Sōichi Shimada
Written by Chūji Mikasano
Music by Yutaka Yamada
Studio Pierrot
Licensed by
Released September 30, 2015
Original video animation
Tokyo Ghoul: PINTO
Directed by Tadahito Matsubayashi
Written by Sōichi Shimada
Music by Yutaka Yamada
Studio Pierrot
Licensed by
Released December 25, 2015
Light novel
Tokyo Ghoul:re
Written by Shin Towada
Illustrated by Sui Ishida
Published by Shueisha
Demographic Male
Magazine JUMP j-BOOKS
Original run December 19, 2016 – present
Volumes 1 (List of volumes)
Anime television series
Tokyo Ghoul:re
Directed by Odahiro Watanabe
Written by Chūji Mikasano
Music by Yutaka Yamada
Studio Pierrot
Licensed by
Original network Tokyo MX, Sun TV, TVA, TVQ, BS11
English network
Original run April 3, 2018 – present
Episodes 14 (List of episodes)
Video games

  • Tokyo Ghoul: carnaval ∫ color
  • Tokyo Ghoul: Jail
  • Tokyo Ghoul: re Invoke
  • Tokyo Ghoul: Dark War
  • Tokyo Ghoul: re Call to Exist
Live-action film

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A 12-episode anime television series adaptation by studio Pierrot aired on Tokyo MX between July 4, 2014 and September 19, 2014. A 12-episode second season, Tokyo Ghoul √A (pronounced Tokyo Ghoul Root A), which follows an original story, began airing on January 9, 2015, and concluded on March 27, 2015. In North America, Viz Media is publishing the manga while Funimation has licensed the anime series for streaming and home video distribution.

A live-action film based on the manga was released in Japan on July 29, 2017. An anime adaptation based on the sequel manga Tokyo Ghoul:re began airing on April 3, 2018, with the series being split into two seasons.

Contents

SynopsisEdit

SettingEdit

Tokyo Ghoul is set in an alternate reality where ghouls, cannibalistic 'monsters' who look exactly like normal people but can only survive by eating human flesh, live among the human population in secret, hiding their true nature in order to evade pursuit from the authorities. Including enhanced speed, senses, and regenerative ability, a regular ghoul is several times stronger than a normal human, has a skin resistant to ordinary piercing weapons and has at least one special predatory organ called a kagune (Japanese: 赫子), which it can manifest and use as a weapon during combat. Another distinctive trait of ghouls is that when they are excited or hungry, the color of their sclera in both eyes turns black and their irises red. This mutation is known as kakugan (赫眼, "red eye").

A half-ghoul can either be born naturally as a ghoul and a human's offspring, or artificially created by transplanting some ghoul organs into a human. In both cases, a half-ghoul is usually much stronger than a pure-blood ghoul. In the case of a half-ghoul, only one of the eyes undergoes the "red eye" transformation.

There is also the case of half-humans, hybrids of ghouls and humans that can feed like normal humans and lack a Kagune while possessing enhanced abilities, like increased speed and reaction speed, but shortened lifespans.

To hunt down the ghouls, several government-sponsored organizations such as the CCG were created worldwide.

PlotEdit

The story follows Ken Kaneki, a college student who barely survives a deadly encounter with Rize Kamishiro, his date who reveals herself as a ghoul. He is taken to the hospital in critical condition. After recovering, Kaneki discovers that he underwent a surgery that transformed him into a half-ghoul. This was accomplished because some of Rize's organs were transferred into his body, and now, like normal ghouls, he must consume human flesh to survive. The ghouls who manage the coffee shop "Anteiku" take him in and teach him to deal with his new life as a half-ghoul. Some of his daily struggles include fitting into the ghoul society, as well as keeping his identity hidden from his human companions, especially from his best friend Hideyoshi Nagachika.

The prequel series Tokyo Ghoul [Jack] follows the youths of Kishō Arima and Taishi Fura, two characters from the main series who become acquainted when they join forces to investigate the death of Taishi's friend by the hands of a ghoul, leading to Taishi eventually following Arima's path and joining the CCG (Commission of Counter Ghoul), the federal agency tasked into dealing with crimes related to ghouls as well.

The sequel series Tokyo Ghoul:re follows an amnesiac Kaneki under the new identity of Haise Sasaki (the result of horrific brain damage sustained from Kishō Arima). He is the mentor of a special team of CCG investigators called "Quinx Squad" that underwent a similar procedure as his, allowing them to obtain the special abilities of Ghouls in order to fight them, but still being able to live as normal humans.

MediaEdit

MangaEdit

Tokyo Ghoul started as a manga series, written and drawn by Sui Ishida. It began serialization in 2011's 41st issue of Weekly Young Jump, published by Shueisha on September 8, 2011,[4] and the final chapter appeared in 2014's 42nd issue, released on September 18, 2014.[5][6] The series has been collected in fourteen tankōbon volumes, released under Shueisha's Young Jump Comics imprint between February 17, 2012,[7] and October 17, 2014.[8] The series has been licensed for an English release by Viz Media and the first volume was released on June 16, 2015.[9]

In August 2013, a prequel spin-off manga titled Tokyo Ghoul [Jack] was released on Jump Live digital manga. The story spans 7 chapters and focuses on Arima Kishō and Taishi Fura 12 years before the events of Tokyo Ghoul. The manga features several characters from the main series including the above stated Kishō Arima, Taishi Fura, and future key characters Itsuki Marude and Yakumo "Yamori" Ōmori.

On October 17, 2014, a full-color illustration book known as Tokyo Ghoul Zakki was released along with the 14th and final volume of the manga. Zakki includes all promotional images, Volume covers and unreleased concept art with commentary by the creator Sui Ishida.

A sequel titled Tokyo Ghoul:re began serialization in 2014's 46th issue of Weekly Young Jump, published on October 16, 2014.[10] The series is set 2 years after the end of the original series and introduces a new set of characters.[11]

Light novelsEdit

Four light novels have been released thus far and all are written by Shin Towada, with illustrations done by series creator Sui Ishida.

On June 19, 2013, Tokyo Ghoul: Days (東京喰種トーキョーグール[日々], Tōkyō Gūru[Hibi]) was released, Illustrations were done by the series creator Sui Ishida and written by Shin Towada and serves as sidestory/spin off that focuses on the daily lives of characters from the Tokyo Ghoul series.

Tokyo Ghoul: Void (東京喰種トーキョーグール[空白], Tōkyō Gūru[Kūhaku]) was released on June 19, 2014, and fills in the 6 month time gap between volumes 8 and 9 of the first series.

The third novel Tokyo Ghoul: Past (東京喰種トーキョーグール[昔日], Tōkyō Gūru[Sekijitsu]) was released on December 19, 2014. Past takes place before the events of the main series and focuses on further backstory of certain Tokyo Ghoul characters, including Touka Kirishima, Ayato Kirishima, and series protagonist Ken Kaneki.

The fourth novel, Tokyo Ghoul:re: quest (東京喰種:re[quest], Tōkyō Gūru:re: quest) was released on December 19, 2016. It takes place during the events of Tokyo Ghoul :re, focusing on the Quinx, CGG, and other characters.

AnimeEdit

A 12-episode anime television series adaptation by Pierrot aired on Tokyo MX between July 4 and September 19, 2014.[1][6][12][13] It also aired on TV Aichi, TVQ, TVO, AT-X, and Dlife. The opening theme song is "unravel" by "TK from Ling Tosite Sigure", and the ending theme is "Saints" (聖者たち, Seijatachi) performed by People In The Box. Funimation has licensed the anime series for streaming and home video distribution in North America.[14] A second season, titled Tokyo Ghoul √A (root A) aired in Japan between January 9, 2015, and March 27, 2015.[15][16] The opening theme song is "Incompetence" (無能, Munō) by österreich, while the ending theme is "The Seasons Die Out, One After Another" (季節は次々死んでいく, Kisetsu wa Tsugitsugi Shindeiku) by Amazarashi. On March 10, 2017, it was announced that the anime will premiere on Adult Swim's Saturday late-night action programming block, Toonami starting on March 25.[17] Madman Entertainment announced that they had licensed the series in Australia and New Zealand, and simulcasted it on AnimeLab.[18] Anime Limited licensed the series in the UK and Ireland,[19] and later announced during MCM London Comic-Con that the series will be broadcast on VICELAND UK.[20]

An anime adaptation for Tokyo Ghoul:re was announced on October 5, 2017, and started airing on April 3, 2018.[21] Odahiro Watanabe will replace Shuhei Morita as the director, while Chūji Mikasano will return to write scripts. Pierrot will animate the series, while Pierrot+ is credited for animation assistance. Atsuko Nakajima will replace Kazuhiro Miwa as the character designer.[22] The opening theme of the first season is Asphyxia by Cö Shu Nie and the ending theme is Half by Ziyoou-vachi. The series will air in two seasons, with the first 12 episodes airing from April 2018 to June 2018,[23] and second season airing from October 9, 2018.[24][25] The opening theme of the second season is "katharsis" by TK from Ling Tosite Sigure, and the ending theme of the second season is "Rakuen no Kimi" (楽園の君) by österreich.[25]

Video gamesEdit

A video game titled Tokyo Ghoul: Carnaval by Bandai Namco Games was released in Japan for Android smartphones on February 6, 2015,[26] and on February 9 for iOS.[27] The player can build his or her team from a number of ghoul and investigator characters and explore a 3D map.[28] Another video game titled Tokyo Ghoul: Jail for the PlayStation Vita console was released on October 1, 2015. It is set to introduce a new protagonist by the name of Rio, who will interact with characters from the manga/anime. The game was developed by Bandai Namco Games as well and is categorized as an adventure RPG where players will be able to explore Tokyo's 23 wards.[29] The mobile game Tokyo Ghoul: Dark War focuses on the conflict between ghouls and the CCG that terrorizes the city of Tokyo.[30] In the June 2018 edition of V-Jump it was revealed that a new game, titled Tokyo Ghoul:re - Call to Exist, was due to release in Japan later that year.[31][32]

Live action filmEdit

A live-action film based on the manga was released in Japan on July 29, 2017. Kentarō Hagiwara directed the film. The cast included Masataka Kubota for the role of protagonist Ken Kaneki and Fumika Shimizu for the role of Touka Kirishima.[33] Yū Aoi was cast as Rize Kamishiro, Nobuyuki Suzuki played Kotaro Amon and Yo Oizumi played Kureo Mado.[34]

ReceptionEdit

Tokyo Ghoul was the 27th best-selling manga series in Japan in 2013, with 1.6 million estimated sales. As of January 2014, the manga had sold around 2.6 million copies.[35] It was the fourth best-selling manga series in Japan in 2014, with 6.9 million copies sold.[36] The whole original series sold over 12 million copies.[37]

The sequel series, Tokyo Ghoul:re sold over 3.7 million copies in Japan during its debut year in 2015,[38] and 4.3 million copies in 2016.[39] It was the fifth best-selling manga series in 2017 with sales of over 5.3 million copies.[40] Both series combined for over 24 million copies in circulation by June 2017,[41] and they had 34 million copies in print worldwide as of January 2018.[42] As of July 2018, both manga had 37 million in print.[43]

On June 12, 2015, the Chinese Ministry of Culture listed Tokyo Ghoul √A among 38 anime and manga titles banned in China.[44]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Oscar Nominee Morita Helms Tokyo Ghoul Anime at Pierrot". Anime News Network. February 22, 2014. Archived from the original on February 28, 2014. Retrieved February 22, 2014.
  2. ^ "The Official Website for Tokyo Ghoul". Viz Media. Retrieved October 27, 2017.
  3. ^ "@Clarknova1: @Zonic505 Both seasons". twitter.com. March 10, 2017. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  4. ^ 人を捕食する怪人描く新連載「東京喰種」がヤンジャンで (in Japanese). Natalie.mu. September 8, 2011. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  5. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul Manga to End This Month". Anime News Network. September 12, 2014. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  6. ^ a b 石田スイ「東京喰種」完結、最終巻は10月に (in Japanese). Natalie.mu. September 18, 2014. Retrieved September 18, 2014.
  7. ^ 東京喰種 1―トーキョーグール (ヤングジャンプコミックス) (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  8. ^ 東京喰種トーキョーグール 14 (in Japanese). Shueisha. Retrieved 2015-01-13.
  9. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul, Vol. 1". Amazon.com. October 9, 2014. Retrieved 2015-01-13.
  10. ^ 石田スイ新連載は喰種の新章、アニメ2期も (in Japanese). Natalie.mu. October 11, 2014. Retrieved October 13, 2014.
  11. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul:re Manga Changes Main Character". Anime News Network. October 11, 2014. Retrieved October 13, 2014.
  12. ^ "Natsuki Hanae, Sora Amamiya, Kana Hanazawa Lead Tokyo Ghoul Anime's Cast". Anime News Network. March 15, 2014. Archived from the original on April 14, 2014. Retrieved March 15, 2014.
  13. ^ 東京喰種 トーキョーグール (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2016-08-14. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  14. ^ "Funimation Acquires Tokyo Ghoul, Street Fighter:Assassin Fist". Anime News Network. June 8, 2014. Archived from the original on July 25, 2014.
  15. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul TV Anime's 2nd Season to Premiere in January". Anime News Network. October 10, 2014. Retrieved October 13, 2014.
  16. ^ "東京喰種 トーキョーグール √A". Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2016-08-14. Retrieved July 17, 2016.
  17. ^ "Toonami's bummed to see One Piece go, but excited to announce our newest show, Tokyo Ghoul! Premiering Saturday, 3/25!". Facebook. March 10, 2017.
  18. ^ Hayward, Jon (June 14, 2014). "Madman Entertainment Acquires Tokyo Ghoul". Anime News Network. Retrieved June 16, 2018.
  19. ^ Osmond, Andrew (May 2, 2015). "Anime Limited Plans for Home Releases of Plastic Memories and Tokyo Ghoul". Anime News Network. Retrieved June 16, 2018.
  20. ^ "UK TV channel VICELAND announces daily anime programming from 17th July". Anime UK News. June 20, 2017. Retrieved June 16, 2018.
  21. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul:re Anime Reveals Season 3 Premiere Date". Gojinshi. February 20, 2018. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  22. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul:re Anime's Main Staff Revealed". Anime News Network. October 30, 2017. Retrieved October 30, 2017.
  23. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul:re Anime Listed With 12 Episodes". Anime News Network. April 3, 2018. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  24. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul:re Anime Gets 2nd Season in October". Anime News Network. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  25. ^ a b Loo, Egan (September 9, 2018). "Tokyo Ghoul:re Season 2 Confirms October 9 Debut, Opening Song Info". Anime News Network. Retrieved September 9, 2018.
  26. ^ "東京喰種 carnaval" (in Japanese). Google Play. 2014-02-06. Retrieved 2015-02-09.
  27. ^ "iOS version of the Tokyo Ghoul carnaval released today in Japan". senpaigamer.com. 2015-02-09. Archived from the original on 7 March 2016. Retrieved 19 October 2016.
  28. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul carnaval Smartphone Game Teased in Video". Anime News Network. December 24, 2014. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  29. ^ ""Tokyo Ghoul" video game to come on PS Vita; April Fool's Prank by manga creator affects launching confirmation?". VENTURE CAPITAL POST. January 21, 2015. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  30. ^ "'Tokyo Ghoul: Dark War' Mobile RPG Out Now For Android In Select Countries, US Release Likely In Late 2018". The Inquisitr. 2018-01-11. Retrieved 2018-03-07.
  31. ^ "Survival action game Tokyo Ghoul: re Call to Exist announced for PS4 [Update] - Gematsu". Gematsu. 2018-06-18. Retrieved 2018-06-19.
  32. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul:re Call to Exist Announced As A Survival Action Game For PS4 - Siliconera". Siliconera. 2018-06-18. Retrieved 2018-06-19.
  33. ^ "Live-Action Tokyo Ghoul Film Casts Masataka Kubota, Fumika Shimizu". Anime News Network. June 23, 2016. Retrieved June 23, 2016.
  34. ^ "Live-Action "Tokyo Ghoul" Adds Cast". Crunchyroll. August 9, 2016. Retrieved August 17, 2016.
  35. ^ "Sui Ishida's Suspense Horror Manga Tokyo Ghoul Gets Anime". Anime News Network. January 16, 2014. Archived from the original on January 30, 2014. Retrieved January 16, 2014.
  36. ^ "Top-Selling Manga in Japan by Series: 2014". Anime News Network. November 30, 2014. Retrieved March 8, 2015.
  37. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul Horror Manga Gets Stage Play". Anime News Network. March 20, 2015. Retrieved December 14, 2015.
  38. ^ "Top-Selling Manga in Japan by Series: 2015". Anime News Network. November 30, 2015. Retrieved December 14, 2015.
  39. ^ "Top-Selling Manga in Japan by Series: 2016". Anime News Network. Retrieved 2018-02-04.
  40. ^ Ashcraft, Brian. "The Best-Selling Manga Of 2017 In Japan". Kotaku. Retrieved 2018-02-04.
  41. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul, Tokyo Ghoul:re Have 24 Million Copies in Print". Anime News Network. June 19, 2017. Retrieved June 19, 2017.
  42. ^ "Tokyo Ghoul Manga Franchise Has 34 Million Copies in Print Worldwide". Anime News Network. January 18, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  43. ^ "Roundup of Newly Revealed Print Counts for Manga, Light Novel Series (June-July 2018)". Anime News Network. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  44. ^ "China bans 38 anime & manga titles incuding Attack on Titan". Special Broadcasting Service. 2015-06-12. Retrieved 2018-08-31.

External linksEdit