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Talk:We Three Kings

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We Three KingsEdit

Shouldn't the date in "It is suggested to have been written in 1957" be 1857, not 1957? Bartleby62 (talk) 05:58, 5 January 2008 (UTC) but some poeple say it was discoverd by 1863. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.73.71.214 (talk) 20:42, 12 November 2012 (UTC)

Christmas songs; Verses & ChorusEdit

What kind of Christmas song do you think this is?? Studying the music, the verse is the sad part to listen to and the chorus is the happy part. Anyone know why this is true?? Any other Christmas songs that this can be said about?? Georgia guy 17:04, 26 Mar 2005 (UTC)

LyricsEdit

I have found at least three versions of the last line of verse five. The most popular seems to be: Alleluia, Alleluia, Earth to the heav'ns replies. (one source makes it "Earth to heav'n replies" with two notes on "Earth") This one scans a bit better, and makes grammatical sense: Heav'n sings "Hallelujah!""Hallelujah" Earth replies. This from a christmas carol web site: Alleluia, alleluia! sounds through the earth and skies. None of these are exactly what is published in the main article here. How can we get the authoritative version?

Lyrics We three kings of orient are... — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2A02:C7F:DC1A:CE00:CD0F:481A:89CF:A12C (talk) 19:54, 6 November 2017 (UTC)

Lyrics, ParodyEdit

Anyone know where I can get the complete lyrics for "We three Kings of Orient are; Tried to smoke a rubber cigar; It was loaded, it exploded; We two Kings..."? I heard Peter Schickely perform it on the radio, but couldn't remember all the lyrics. - Bellatrix L. 02:23, 25 December 2006 (UTC)

Maybe here - Gwynevans 09:03, 5 January 2007 (UTC)

In 1967 I heard it in So California as:

We three Kings of Orient are;
Trying to smoke a rubber cigar;
It was loaded and it exploded!;
Boom! (or sound of explosion);
We two Kings of Orient are;
Trying to smoke a rubber cigar;
It was loaded and it exploded!;
Boom! (or sound of explosion);
I one King of Orient are;
Trying to smoke a rubber cigar;
It was loaded and it exploded!;
Boom! (or sound of explosion);
(pause);
"Silent Night"...


The two alternatives that were in common usage when I was in school were:

We three kings of Leicester Square
Selling ladies underwear
So fantastic, no elastic
Only tuppence a pair

and

We four Beatles of Liverpool are,
Paul in a taxi, John in a car,
George on a scooter, beeping his hooter,
Following Ringo Star.

My understanding is that both the above were 'national' versions, whereas the "Hamilton Square" version in the article would have been strictly regional, as while most Brits would have known of Leicester Square, few outside Liverpool would know of Hamilton Square.
- Gwynevans 09:03, 5 January 2007 (UTC)

Apparently, this article had them until November 27, 2008 http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=We_Three_Kings&diff=254502156&oldid=254492386 If I may paste the text under "other versions" as it was then:

We three kings, of orient are

trying to smoke a rubber cigar. [The material of the cigar varies]
It was loaded,
it exploded!
Now we are seeing stars!

[Alternatively, some versions use a loud "BOOM!" or an uncomfortable period of silence instead of "Now we are seeing stars!"]

We two kings, of orient are... [emphasis added]

[That is, the song starts over, gradually diminishing the number of kings, ending with either "We no kings" or "Silent Night..."]

Another more common parody runs:

We three kings of orient are
One in a taxi, one in a car
One on a scooter pipping his hoooter
Didnt get very far


In Manchester UK, the above verse was sung with slightly different -but arguably better- lyrics:
We three kings of orient are
One in a taxi, one in a car
One on a scooter beeping his hooter
Following from afar.
A slight variation is:
We three kings of orient are
One in a taxi, one in a car
One on a scooter blowing his hoooter
Smoking a big cigar

Or alternatively, with a second verse:

We three kings of orient are
One in a taxi, one in a car
One on a scooter parping his hooter
Following yonder star
Oh star of wonder, star of night
Sit on a pack of dynamite
Light the fuse and off we go
On our way to Mexico — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.6.41.63 (talk) 10:53, 16 April 2014 (UTC)
  • A parody of the carol, substituting The Beatles for the Kings also exists:
We four Beatles of Liverpool are:
John in a taxi, Paul in a car,
George on a scooter, beeping the hooter,
Following Ringo Starr

--159.90.9.106 (talk) 18:53, 1 December 2008 (UTC)

there was another revision a year before that one that deleted parody lyrics:

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=We_Three_Kings&diff=next&oldid=119962354 Earfetish1 (talk) 07:52, 2 January 2009 (UTC)

Growing up in the Black Country during the early 1960s we had: "We three kings of orient are / One in a bike and one in a car / One on a scooter papping his hooter / going to Perry Bar". Presumably bikes were more common that taxis! Perry Barr is to the North of Birmingham. Martin of Sheffield (talk) 09:11, 4 October 2011 (UTC)

"Remains one of the most popular ... today" Source outdatedEdit

"It remains one of the most popular and most frequently sung Christmas carols today." The source for this information is at least thirty-one years old. Although the newspaper used as a source describes the information before it very well, the age of it calls into question if it is still accurate about the popularity of the carol. From personal experience, I've never before heard or read the carol before today, knowing only of what it is based on. If anyone can find any recent evidence of the song's popularity, like a poll or official ranking, it should be added as a source. Bladeavuari (talk) 19:08, 20 January 2014 (UTC)

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