Roman Sadovsky

Roman Sadovsky (born May 31, 1999) is a Canadian figure skater. He is the 2020 Canadian national champion, the 2019 NHK Trophy bronze medalist, and a three-time ISU Challenger Series medalist. He also won five medals on the ISU Junior Grand Prix series, including two gold medals.

Roman Sadovsky
Roman Sadovsky - 2018 Autumn Classic.jpg
Sadovsky at the 2018 Autumn Classic
Personal information
Country representedCanada
Born (1999-05-31) May 31, 1999 (age 22)
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Home townVaughan, Ontario
Height1.84 m (6 ft 12 in)
CoachTracey Wainman, Grzegorz Filipowski
Former coachBrian Orser, Lee Barkell, Allen Carson
ChoreographerDavid Wilson, Mark Pillay
Former choreographerGrzegorz Filipowski, Carol Lane, Juris Razgulajevs
Skating clubYork Region Skating Academy
Former skating clubToronto Cricket Skating & Curling Club
Training locationsToronto
Former training locationsRichmond Hill, Ontario
Began skating2004
ISU personal best scores
Combined total247.50
2019 NHK Trophy
Short program89.61
2021 World Team Trophy
Free skate168.99
2019 NHK Trophy
YouTube information
Channel
Years active2018-present
Genre
Subscribers18.4K[1]
Total views883,191[1]
NetworkYouTube

Personal lifeEdit

Sadovsky was born on May 31, 1999, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[2] His parents moved to Canada from Ukraine.[3] After attending Christ The King CES, he continued his education at Bill Crothers Secondary School.[4]

CareerEdit

Early yearsEdit

Sadovsky began learning to skate at the age of five years in order to play hockey.[3][4] Tracey Wainman started coaching him when he was eight.[3] Another early coach was Allen Carson.[5]

2012–2013 seasonEdit

Making his Junior Grand Prix debut, Sadovsky won a bronze medal in Lake Placid, New York, and placed tenth in Bled, Slovenia.[6] He withdrew from the 2013 Canadian Championships due to a metatarsal fracture in his right foot on a growth plate near the toe.[3][7]

2013–2014 seasonEdit

Coached by Tracey Wainman and Grzegorz Filipowski at the York Region Skating Academy in Richmond Hill, Ontario,[8] Sadovsky competed in two events of the 2013 Junior Grand Prix series, placing fourteenth in Riga, Latvia, and eighth in Minsk, Belarus. Nationally, he appeared on the senior level, finishing eighth at the 2014 Canadian Championships. He was selected for the 2014 World Junior Championships in Sofia, Bulgaria.[9] Ranked fourteenth in the short program and twelfth in the free skate, he finished thirteenth overall.[10]

2014–2015 seasonEdit

Sadovsky's first assignment of the 2014 Junior Grand Prix series was in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Ranked first in the short program and third in the free skate, he finished first overall by a margin of 3.39 points over the silver medalist, Alexander Samarin. After the event, Sadovsky said his goal was to develop a solid triple Axel.[11] He then went on to place fourth at his second JGP event in Dresden, Germany. With those results, Sadovsky qualified for the 2014 JGP Final and placed fifth.

At the 2015 Canadian Championships, Sadovsky placed fourth. He ended his season with a fourteenth-place finish at the 2015 World Junior Championships.

2015–2016 seasonEdit

In the 2015 Junior Grand Prix season, Sadovsky was assigned to the first event, held in Bratislava, Slovakia. With a quad Salchow in the free skate — Sadovsky's first quad in competition — he won the gold medal with a total score 2.87 points ahead of Vincent Zhou of the United States.[12] He then went on to win bronze at his second JGP event, in Toruń, Poland. These results qualified him for the 2015 JGP Final, where he was sixth. He represented Canada at the 2016 Winter Youth Olympics and finished fourth. He was coached by Wainman and Filipowski.[13]

2016–2017 seasonEdit

Sadovsky changed coaches, joining Brian Orser and Lee Barkell at the Toronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club.[14] He placed ninth at the 2017 Canadian Championships. Ranked ninth in the short program and twenty-third in the free skate, he finished seventeenth at the 2017 World Junior Championships in Taipei, Taiwan.

2017–2018 seasonEdit

Sadovsky switched back to Wainman and Filipowski.[15] Making his Grand Prix debut, he placed tenth at the 2017 Skate America. He finished seventh at the 2018 Canadian Championships.

2018–2019 seasonEdit

Sadovsky began the season at the 2018 CS Autumn Classic International, where he placed fourth in both the short and free programs, winning the bronze medal, his first senior medal. Sadovsky landed his first quad toe loop jump in competition.[16] He then placed twelfth at the 2018 Skate Canada International, after struggling in both of his programs, and won the silver medal at the 2018 Inge Solar Memorial.

Sadovsky placed fifth in the short program at the 2019 Canadian Championships, executing his open quadruple Salchow-triple toe loop combination cleanly, but popping a planned quad toe loop and receiving a negative Grade of Execution on his triple Axel.[17] He dropped to seventh place overall following a difficult free skate.

2019–2020 seasonEdit

Starting out the season on the Challenger series, Sadovsky won the bronze medal at the 2019 CS Finlandia Trophy after placing third in the short program and fourth in the free skate.[18]

Sadovsky placed tenth at Skate Canada International, his first Grand Prix assignment for the season.[19] Competing next at the 2019 NHK Trophy, Sadovsky placed fourth in the short program despite making two jump errors, one of them costing him the second part of his combination.[20] He was second in the free skate, making only two minor errors on his second triple Axel and closing triple Lutz, and placed third overall, taking his first ever Grand Prix medal.[21]

Entering the 2020 Canadian Championships as a contender for the title, Sadovsky placed third in the short program behind Keegan Messing and Nam Nguyen, having had two of his jumps called as underrotated.[22] He then won the free skate, with only two minor jump errors on his triple loop and second triple Axel, while Messing and Nguyen both struggled. Sadovsky won his first national title by a margin of over seventeen points.[23] Sadovsky was named to one of Canada's three men's berths at the 2020 Four Continents Championships, but Skate Canada declined to immediately decide who would be Canada's sole men's representative at the 2020 World Championships in Montreal.[24] Sadovsky placed sixteenth at Four Continents, and thus was not chosen for the World Championships, instead claimed by Nguyen.[25]

2020–2021 seasonEdit

Sadovsky was assigned to compete at the 2020 Skate Canada International, but the event was cancelled as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.[26]

On November 9, Sadovsky revealed the choreography for his free program to "Chasing Cars" by the Irish band Snow Patrol, which was uploaded to his YouTube channel.[27]

With the pandemic making it difficult to hold in-person events, the 2021 Skate Canada Challenge, the main qualifying competition for the national championships, was held virtually. Sadovsky placed first in both the short program and the free skate, taking the gold medal over Nam Nguyen by a margin of 5.58 points. Due to the cancellation of the 2021 Canadian Championships, many called this a de facto national title.[28]

Sadovsky was named as an alternate to the 2021 World Championships, the lone men's berth going to Keegan Messing.[29] With Canada's mandatory two-week quarantine for returning athletes, however, no member of the World team was assigned to the 2021 World Team Trophy, and Sadovsky was assigned as one of Canada's two men's entries, alongside Nguyen.[30] Sadovsky placed sixth in the short program at World Team Trophy, setting a new personal best, but was tenth of eleven skaters in the free skate. Team Canada finished in sixth place.[31][32][33]

ProgramsEdit

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2020–2021
[34]
2019–2020
[35]
2018–2019
[2]
2017–2018
[36][15][37]

2016–2017
[14]
2015–2016
[13]
2014–2015
[38][39]
  • The Prophet
    by Gary Moore
    choreo. by Grzegorz Filipowski
2013–2014
[8]
  • Les Misérables
    by Claude-Michel Schönberg
    choreo. by Mark Pillay
2012–2013
[5]
  • Live and Let Die
    performed by David Garrett
  • Tomorrow Never Dies
    by David Arnold

Competitive highlightsEdit

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[6]
Event 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19 19–20 20–21
Four Continents 16th
GP NHK Trophy 3rd
GP Skate America 10th
GP Skate Canada 12th 10th C
CS Alpen Trophy 2nd
CS Autumn Classic 3rd
CS Finlandia 10th 3rd
CS Golden Spin 7th
International: Junior[6]
Junior Worlds 13th 14th 17th
Youth Olympics 4th
JGP Final 5th 6th
JGP Belarus 8th
JGP Czech Rep. 1st
JGP Estonia 2nd
JGP Germany 4th
JGP Japan 5th
JGP Latvia 14th
JGP Poland 3rd
JGP Slovakia 1st
JGP Slovenia 10th
JGP U.S. 3rd
International: Advanced novice[6]
Challenge Cup 1st
National[40]
Canadian Champ. 2nd N WD 8th 4th 9th 9th 7th 7th 1st C
SC Challenge 2nd N 1st J 5th 1st
Team Events
World Team Trophy 6th T
10th P
Levels: N = Novice, J = Junior
TBD = Assigned; WD = Withdrew; C = Event cancelled
T = Team Result; P = Personal Result
Medals awarded for team result only

Detailed resultsEdit

Small medals for short and free programs awarded only at ISU Championships. At team events, medals awarded for team results only.

2020–2021 season
Date Event SP FS Total
15–18 April 2021 2021 World Team Trophy 6
89.61
10
134.80
6T/10P
224.41
8–17 January 2021 2021 Skate Canada Challenge 1
94.43
1
167.58
1
262.01
2019–20 season
Date Event SP FS Total
February 4–9, 2020 2020 Four Continents Championships 17
65.87
15
134.63
16
200.50
January 13–19, 2020 2020 Canadian Championships 3
85.02
1
175.55
1
260.57
November 22–24, 2019 2019 NHK Trophy 4
78.51
2
168.99
3
247.50
October 25–27, 2019 2019 Skate Canada International 11
65.29
8
139.06
10
204.35
October 11–13, 2019 2019 CS Finlandia Trophy 3
86.34
4
135.89
3
222.23
2018–19 season
Date Event SP FS Total
January 14–20, 2019 2019 Canadian Championships 5
82.10
7
136.61
7
218.71
November 11–18, 2018 2018 CS Alpen Trophy 2
77.91
5
127.04
2
204.95
October 26–28, 2018 2018 Skate Canada International 12
67.72
8
142.88
12
210.60
September 20–22, 2018 2018 CS Autumn Classic International 4
78.14
4
155.72
3
233.86
2017–18 season
Date Event SP FS Total
January 8–14, 2018 2018 Canadian Championships 7
78.72
8
154.95
7
233.67
November 24–26, 2017 2017 Skate America 9
70.85
10
129.25
10
200.10
October 6–8, 2017 2017 CS Finlandia Trophy 12
59.19
9
134.98
10
194.17
2016–17 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
March 15–19, 2017 2017 World Junior Championships Junior 9
76.27
23
110.26
17
186.53
January 16–22, 2017 2017 Canadian Championships Senior 7
72.38
10
130.58
9
202.96
December 7–10, 2016 2016 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb Senior 6
74.66
8
143.28
7
217.94
September 28 – October 2, 2016 2016 JGP Estonia Junior 3
71.96
2
149.25
2
221.21
September 8–11, 2016 2016 JGP Japan Junior 5
67.94
4
143.61
5
211.55
2015–16 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
February 12–21, 2016 2016 Winter Youth Olympics Junior 2
72.61
4
133.08
4
205.69
January 18–24, 2016 2016 Canadian Championships Senior 9
64.17
8
140.42
9
204.59
December 10–13, 2015 2015–16 JGP Final Junior 6
59.37
6
109.03
6
168.40
September 23–26, 2015 2015 JGP Poland Junior 2
71.13
5
127.25
3
198.38
August 19–23, 2015 JGP Slovakia Junior 1
68.49
1
135.23
1
203.72

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "About Romsky". YouTube.
  2. ^ a b "Roman SADOVSKY: 2018/2019". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on September 21, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d Smith, Beverley (August 12, 2013). "Roman Sadovsky looking for results on the ISU Junior Grand Prix circuit". Skate Canada. Archived from the original on September 27, 2013.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  4. ^ a b Li, David (December 10, 2014). "Roman Sadovsky: Vaughan skater a rising star". GoodLife Magazine. Archived from the original on October 3, 2015.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  5. ^ a b "Roman SADOVSKY: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on February 15, 2013.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  6. ^ a b c d "Competition Results: Roman SADOVSKY". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on September 21, 2018.
  7. ^ Li, David (January 14, 2013). "Sadovsky withdraws from nationals due to stress fracture". York Region. Archived from the original on December 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b "Roman SADOVSKY: 2013/2014". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on March 15, 2014.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  9. ^ "Canadians prepared to compete at 2014 ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships". Skate Canada. March 7, 2014.
  10. ^ "ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships 2014: Junior Men Result". International Skating Union. March 13, 2014.
  11. ^ "Canadian figure skater Roman Sadovsky wins ISU junior Grand Prix title". Winnipeg Free Press. The Canadian Press. September 6, 2014.
  12. ^ Daignualt, Louis (August 22, 2015). "Canada's Roman Sadovsky wins gold at ISU Junior Grand Prix". Skate Canada.
  13. ^ a b "Roman SADOVSKY: 2015/2016". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 27, 2016.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  14. ^ a b "Roman SADOVSKY: 2016/2017". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on March 17, 2017.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  15. ^ a b "Roman SADOVSKY: 2017/2018". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 17, 2017.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  16. ^ "Weaver and Poje unveil new program and win gold at 2018 Autumn Classic International". Skate Canada. September 22, 2018.
  17. ^ Curley, Sean (January 19, 2019). "Gogolev edges out Messing for men's lead in St. John". Golden Skate.
  18. ^ "New Canadian pairs duo Bilodeau, Ilyushechkina win bronze at Finlandia Trophy". CBC Sports. October 12, 2019.
  19. ^ Slater, Paula (October 27, 2019). "Hanyu takes first Skate Canada gold in Kelowna". Golden Skate.
  20. ^ Slater, Paula (November 22, 2019). "Hanyu takes 18-point lead at NHK Trophy". Golden Skate.
  21. ^ Slater, Paula (November 23, 2019). "Hanyu wins fourth NHK Trophy title with 55 points to spare". Golden Skate.
  22. ^ Flett, Ted (January 17, 2020). "Messing gives heartfelt performance to take the lead in Mississauga". Golden Skate.
  23. ^ Slater, Paula (January 19, 2020). "Roman Sadovsky leaps to Canadian National title". Golden Skate.
  24. ^ Brodie, Robert (January 19, 2020). "SKATE CANADA DEFERS NAMING WORLDS TEAM". International Figure Skating.
  25. ^ "Nam Nguyen added to Canada's world championship figure skating team". Vancouver Courier. February 13, 2020.
  26. ^ "Skate Canada International in Ottawa cancelled as COVID-19 cases rise". CBC Sports. October 14, 2020.
  27. ^ Roman Sadovsky's Free Program Revealed! 🔥🔥🔥 (YouTube). November 9, 2020.
  28. ^ Ewing, Lori (January 17, 2021). "Roman Sadovsky wins the Challenge, his only event of the figure skating season". The Toronto Star.
  29. ^ "Skate Canada names team for 2021 ISU World Figure Skating Championships". Skate Canada. February 25, 2021.
  30. ^ Ewing, Lori (March 16, 2021). "In a season of uncertainty, skaters Moore-Towers, Marinaro excited to get back on ice". CBC Sports.
  31. ^ Slater, Paula (April 15, 2021). "2021 World Team Trophy: Day 1". Golden Skate.
  32. ^ Slater, Paula (April 16, 2021). "2021 World Team Trophy: Day 2". Golden Skate.
  33. ^ Slater, Paula (April 17, 2021). "2021 World Team Trophy: Day 3". Golden Skate.
  34. ^ "Roman SADOVSKY: 2020/2021". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 7, 2020.
  35. ^ "Roman SADOVSKY: 2019/2020". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 12, 2019.
  36. ^ "Roman SADOVSKY: 2017/2018". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 29, 2018.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  37. ^ Sadovsky, Roman (October 24, 2017). "Yeah so... I changed my long. #lesmiserables 🇨🇵" (Instagram).
  38. ^ "Roman SADOVSKY: 2014/2015". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 23, 2015.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  39. ^ Slater, Paula (August 6, 2014). "Canada's Sadovsky aims for top five at nationals". Golden Skate.
  40. ^ "Roman Sadovsky". Skate Canada. Archived from the original on September 21, 2018.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Roman Sadovsky at Wikimedia Commons