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Takeshi Honda (本田 武史, Honda Takeshi, born 23 March 1981) is a former Japanese competitive figure skater. He is a two-time World bronze medalist (2002, 2003), two-time Four Continents champion (1999, 2003), and six-time Japanese national champion.

Takeshi Honda
Honda takeshi.jpg
Personal information
Country represented Japan
Born (1981-03-23) 23 March 1981 (age 38)
Kōriyama, Fukushima, Japan
Height1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)
Former coachDoug Leigh
Michelle Leigh
Galina Zmievskaya
Hiroshi Nagakubo
Retired2006
ISU personal best scores
Combined total207.78
2003 Skate Canada International
Short program77.54
2003 Skate Canada International
Free skate136.62
2003 Skate America

Personal lifeEdit

Takeshi Honda was born on 23 March 1981 in Kōriyama, Fukushima, Japan.[1][2] He plays the piano.[3]

CareerEdit

Honda began short track speed skating at the age of six with his brother and switched to figure skating at nine.[3] At 12, when he entered junior high school, he moved to Sendai to train with Hiroshi Nagakubo.[4] Although he started the training somewhat late, he caught up very quickly and was, at 14, the youngest senior national champion in Japan ever.

In December 1997, Honda left Japan to train with Galina Zmievskaya at the International Skating Center in Simsbury, Connecticut.[5] He represented Japan at the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, where he finished 15th. Following the 1998 Skate Canada International, Honda moved to Barrie, Ontario, Canada to work with Doug Leigh.[3] He became the first Four Continents champion in history when he won the inaugural event in 1999.

In 2002, Honda won the bronze medal at the 2002 World Championships and finished in 4th place at the Winter Olympics. He was the first male skater from Japan to medal at the World Championships since Minoru Sano took the bronze in 1977. Honda withdrew from the 2005 World Championships after injuring his ankle in a fall during the qualifying segment.

Honda ended his competitive career and turned to show skating in March 2006. He is also a TV commentator.[6] He resides in Takatsuki city, Osaka to coach Daisuke Takahashi (as a technical coach)[7] and Kansai University Skating club.[6] He also coached Mai Asada.[8]

ProgramsEdit

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2005–06
[1][9]
2004–05
[10]

2003–04
[13]
  • Wherever You Will Go
    by The Calling
2002–03
[3][14][15]


  • Wherever You Will Go
    by The Calling
2001–02
[16][17]


2000–01
[19]
  • Mambo Mambo
    by Lou Bega
1999–2000
  • I Could Not Ask For More
    by Edwin McCain
1998–99
  • Doop-Doop
    by Doop

1997–98
1996–97
[22]
  • Tico Tico

ResultsEdit

GP: Champions Series/Grand Prix

International[23]
Event 95–96 96–97 97–98 98–99 99–00 00–01 01–02 02–03 03–04 04–05 05–06
Olympics 15th 4th
Worlds 13th 10th 11th 6th 10th 5th 3rd 3rd WD
Four Continents 1st 5th 2nd 2nd 1st WD
GP Final 5th
GP Lalique 3rd
GP NHK Trophy 4th 9th 6th 2nd 6th 4th 1st 2nd 7th 9th
GP Skate America 6th 7th 2nd 2nd
GP Skate Canada 9th 5th 3rd 5th 1st 3rd 7th 4th
GP Sparkassen 5th
Nebelhorn Trophy 1st
Asian Games 1st
International: Junior[23]
Junior Worlds 2nd
National[23]
Japan Champ. 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 5th
WD: Withdrew

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Takeshi HONDA: 2005/2006". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 18 October 2006.
  2. ^ Hine, Tommy (6 February 1998). "Skating Center Athletes". Hartford Courant.
  3. ^ a b c d Mittan, Barry (6 August 2003). "Honda Finds Second Home In Canada". GoldenSkate.com. Retrieved 5 September 2011.
  4. ^ 日本のメダリストのコーチたち~長久保裕編(2) (in Japanese). Sports Hochi. 27 July 2011. Archived from the original on 8 December 2011.
  5. ^ Hine, Tommy (29 March 1998). "Honda Makes The Jump". Hartford Courant.
  6. ^ a b フィギュア本田 コーチ業満喫 [Honda, Figure skater enjoys coaching] (in Japanese). yomiuri. 12 December 2006. Retrieved 8 May 2010.
  7. ^ "Daisuke Takahashi Fan Forum Profile".
  8. ^ "Mai Asada profile" (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 19 December 2010.
  9. ^ "Cutting Edge" pp.90-91
  10. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2004/2005". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 23 July 2005.
  11. ^ a b c d e "Cutting Edge" p.19
  12. ^ "Cutting Edge" p.91
  13. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2003/2004". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 4 June 2004.
  14. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 17 February 2003.
  15. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 2 December 2002.
  16. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2001/2002". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 11 June 2002.
  17. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2001/2002". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 4 October 2001.
  18. ^ a b c d e "Cutting Edge" p.91, 19
  19. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2000/2001". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 9 June 2001.
  20. ^ 『氷上の貴公子』p.105
  21. ^ 『氷上の貴公子』p.10
  22. ^ Mittan, J. Barry (1997). "Takeshi Honda". Archived from the original on 14 May 2012.
  23. ^ a b c "Competition Results: Takeshi HONDA". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Takeshi Honda at Wikimedia Commons