Piala Indonesia

Piala Indonesia (English: Indonesian Cup) is the professional annual cup competition for football clubs in Indonesia. Originally, it started from the semi-professional football era in 1985 as Piala Liga, which running during 1985 to 1989 under Galatama competition.[1] The Football Association of Indonesia (PSSI) organised the full professional cup competition from 2005 until now. Traditionally, this tournament involves all the clubs from the whole layers in football competition in Indonesia, which are Liga 1, Liga 2, and Liga 3.

Piala Indonesia
Kratingdaeng Piala Indonesia.png
Founded1985; 35 years ago (1985) as Piala Liga
1992; 28 years ago (1992) as Piala Galatama
2005; 15 years ago (2005) as Copa Indonesia
2010; 10 years ago (2010)
RegionIndonesia
Number of teams128 (2018–19)
International cup(s)AFC Cup
Current championsPSM Makassar (1st title)
Most successful club(s)Krama Yudha Tiga Berlian & Sriwijaya (3 titles)
Television broadcastersIndonesia
MNC Media
Jawa Pos TV
Telkom Indonesia
K-Vision
Worldwide (including Indonesia)
Mycujoo
WebsiteOfficial website
2018–19 Piala Indonesia

The competition was founded in 2005. Piala Indonesia winners qualify for the AFC Cup the following season.

Sriwijaya was the most successful club in the competition, winning its third consecutive title against Arema Indonesia in the 2010 Final held at the Manahan Stadium.

There were no competition in 2011 and 2013–2017 due to the PSSI's ban on handling all of the football competition by FIFA in 2015-16.[2][3]

HistoryEdit

Originally, it started from the semi-professional football era in 1985 as Piala Liga (English: League Cup), which running during 1985 to 1989 under Galatama competition. The competition was not held from 1990 to 1991, until it was start again during 1992 and 1994 as Piala Galatama (English: Galatama Cup).[4] Since then, there's no Cup competition was played from 1995 to 2004.

PSSI started the professional cup competition in 2005. The competition has been named Copa Dji Sam Soe Indonesia in 2005–2009 due to sponsorship reason. PT. Philip Morris International (Indonesia) is the sponsor of Copa Indonesia for 2005–2009.

For five consecutive editions, PSSI as the organizer or tournament operator uses the name Copa Dji Sam Soe. However, after 2010, for one reason or another, the name of the tournament returned to being the Piala Indonesia. In 2012, after a one-year vacuum, the dualism of the league that hit PSSI made the Indonesian Cup competition only followed by teams playing in the Liga Prima Indonesia (LPI), where at that time the dark horse team, Persibo Bojonegoro, won the 2012 edition.

After 2012, the Piala Indonesia not be held for 6 years before finally rising to the 2018–19 edition. In 2018, Kratingdaeng is the new title sponsor of Piala Indonesia.[5]

List of finalsEdit

Piala Liga
Season Winners Score Runners-up
1985 Arseto Solo 3–0 Mercu Buana
1986 Makassar Utama 1–0 Niac Mitra
1987 Krama Yudha Tiga Berlian 2–0 Pelita Jaya
1988 Krama Yudha Tiga Berlian 1–0 Pelita Jaya
1989 Krama Yudha Tiga Berlian 2–1 Pelita Jaya
Piala Galatama
Season Winners Score Runners-up
1992 Semen Padang 1–0 Arema Malang
1994 Gelora Dewata 1–0 Mitra Surabaya
Copa Indonesia / Piala Indonesia
Season Winners Score Runners-up Location
2005 Arema Malang 4–3 (a.e.t.) Persija Jakarta Gelora Bung Karno Stadium, Jakarta
2006 Arema Malang 2–0 Persipura Jayapura Gelora Delta Stadium, Sidoarjo
2007–08 Sriwijaya 1–1
(3–0 pen.)
Persipura Jayapura Gelora Bung Karno Stadium, Jakarta
2008–09 Sriwijaya 1–0
(4–0 awarded)
Persipura Jayapura Jakabaring Stadium, Palembang
2010 Sriwijaya 2–1 Arema Indonesia Manahan Stadium, Solo
2011 not held
2012 Persibo Bojonegoro 1–0 Semen Padang Sultan Agung Stadium, Bantul
2013–2017 not held
2018–19 PSM Makassar 0–1 Persija Jakarta Gelora Bung Karno Stadium, Jakarta
2–0 Andi Mattalata Stadium, Makassar
PSM Makassar won 2–1 on aggregate

PerformancesEdit

Club Winners Years won Runners-up Years runners-up Total final
appearances
Krama Yudha Tiga Berlian 3 1987, 1988, 1989 3
Sriwijaya 3 2007–08, 2008–09, 2010 3
Arema 2 2005, 2006 2 1992, 2010 4
Semen Padang 1 1992 1 2012 2
Arseto Solo 1 1985 1
Gelora Dewata 1 1994 1
Makassar Utama 1 1986 1
Persibo Bojonegoro 1 2012 1
PSM Makassar 1 2018–19 1
Pelita Jaya 3 1987, 1988, 1989 3
Persipura Jayapura 3 2006, 2007–08, 2008–09 3
Niac Mitra / Mitra Surabaya 2 1986, 1994 2
Persija Jakarta 2 2005, 2018–19 2
Mercu Buana 1 1985 1

AwardsEdit

Title sponsorEdit

Year Name Competition name
2005–2009 Dji Sam Soe Copa Dji Sam Soe
2010–2018 No sponsor Piala Indonesia
2018–present Krating Daeng Kratingdaeng Piala Indonesia

BroadcastersEdit

IndonesiaEdit

Year Broadcasters Description Ref
2010–present MNC Media Selected matches (including all 8 quarter finals, 4 semi finals, and both finals) live on RCTI, MNCTV (starting from quarter finals in 2018), or iNews (starting from round of 32 in 2018) and all in simulcast with Jawa Pos TV. 12

4 8

2018–present Jawa Pos TV 155 matches exclusively live. 3
Telkom Indonesia 94 matches live and free on Telkomsel (via app in smartphones and tablets only), starting from round of 64 (Telkomsel customers only).

62 matches live, starting from round of 32 on Usee TV, also available for free on Usee TV website (for all publics and Pay TV customers).

5 6
Kompas Gramedia Group 84 matches live and free on K-Vision (Pay TV customers only), starting from round of 64. 7

WorldwideEdit

Country/Region Broadcaster Description Ref
International MyCujoo 157 matches exclusively live 4

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Indonesia - List of Official National Cup Tournaments". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  2. ^ "PT Liga Indonesia Batal Gelar Piala Indonesia 2014" (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 9 November 2014. Retrieved 26 October 2014.
  3. ^ "Piala Indonesia Batal Digelar, Persib Dirugikan" (in Indonesian). Retrieved 26 October 2014.
  4. ^ "Indonesia - List of Official National Cup Tournaments". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  5. ^ "Kratingdaeng Sponsor Utama Piala Indonesia". PSSI - Football Association of Indonesia (in Indonesian). Retrieved 8 January 2019.

External linksEdit