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Philip Mark Breedlove (born September 21, 1955)[1] is a four-star General in the United States Air Force who served as the Commander, U.S. European Command, as well as the 17th Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) of NATO Allied Command Operations, from May 2013 until May 4, 2016. He previously served as the Commander, U.S. Air Forces Europe,[2] which he concurrently served as Commander, U.S. Air Forces Africa, Commander, Air Component Command, Ramstein,[3] and Director, Joint Air Power Competence Center. He previously served as the 36th Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force from January 14, 2011, to July 27, 2012. On 10 May 2013, in a ceremony in Stuttgart, Germany, Breedlove took over the command of USEUCOM.[4] Three days later, on May 13, 2013, he assumed command as SACEUR.[5]

Philip M. Breedlove
Breedlove 2013 HR.jpg
Official portrait as Commander, USEUCOM
Birth namePhilip Mark Breedlove
Born (1955-09-21) September 21, 1955 (age 64)
Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.
AllegianceUnited States United States of America
Service/branch United States Air Force
Years of service1977–present
RankUS-O10 insignia.svg General
Commands held
Battles/wars
AwardsDefense Distinguished Service Medal
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal (2)
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit (4)
Defense Meritorious Service Medal (2)
Meritorious Service Medal (4)

On 11 March 2017, NATO's Atlantic Council designated US Army General Curtis Scaparrotti as Breedlove's successor.[6] Scaparrotti took command in Europe on 3 May 2017 (EUCOM) and on 4 May 2018 (SACEUR).

BiographyEdit

Early lifeEdit

Breedlove was born in Atlanta[7] and raised in Forest Park, Georgia. He received his commission after graduating from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1977 where he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha.[8] From March 1978 and going on for the next year, he was a student, undergraduate pilot training, at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona. From March until August of the next year, he was in pilot instructor training at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas. From August 1979 to January 1983, he became a T-37 Tweet instructor pilot, evaluation flight examiner and runway supervisory unit controller at Williams. He then became a F-16 Fighting Falcon student pilot at MacDill Air Force Base in Florida until September 1983. After that, he transferred to Torrejon Air Base, Spain, from September 1983 to January 1985, where he was the F-16 aircraft commander and instructor pilot for the 614th Tactical Fighter Squadron.[9]

Breedlove became an air liaison officer from January 1985 to March 1987 with the 602nd Air Support Operations Group, Kitzingen Army Airfield, West Germany. He later transferred to the 526th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, West Germany, from March 1987 to January 1988. Eventually, he was Chief of Flight Safety, 316th Air Division, at Ramstein, until August 1988. For the next two years, he became first a F-16 flight commander, then assistant operations officer of the 512th Tactical Fighter Squadron, also at Ramstein. From August 1990 to July 1991, he was a student at the Air Command and Staff College located at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. Also in that year, he earned his Master of Science degree in aeronautical technology from Arizona State University. Beginning in July 1991 and going to May 1993, he was the Chief of Air Operations, United Nations Command and Republic of Korea/United States Combined Forces Command, Yongsan Army Garrison, South Korea.[9]

Later careerEdit

Starting in May 1993, Breedlove was the commander of the 80th Fighter Squadron at Kunsan Air Base, South Korea. This position lasted until July 1994, when he became a student at the National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington D.C.. In June 1995, he became the operations officer, United States Pacific Command Division, Joint Staff, The Pentagon, Washington D.C., where he stayed until June. That next month, he became commander of the 27th Operations Group, Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico. In June 1999 and going to that next May, he was the executive officer to the Commander, Headquarters Air Combat Command, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. For the next year, he was the commander of the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan Air Base, South Korea. Beginning in June 2001 and lasting for the next year, he was the senior military assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force, Headquarters United States Air Force, Washington D.C.[9]

 
Breedlove at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, 2 August 2013

From June 2002 to June 2004, he became the commander of the 56th Fighter Wing, located at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. Then for the next year, he became commander of the 31st Fighter Wing, Aviano Air Base, Italy.[10] He then became the Vice Commander of the 16th Air Force at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, from June 2005 to October 2006. His next assignment, which lasted until July 2008, had him as the Vice Director for Strategic Plans and Policy, Joint Staff, The Pentagon, Washington D.C.. From July 2008 to August 2009, he was the Commander of the 3rd Air Force, located at Ramstein Air Base, Germany. In August 2009, he began serving as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Plans and Requirements, Headquarters United States Air Force, Washington D.C.[9]

 
Breedlove with Anders Fogh Rasmussen, 1 May 2013

On January 14, 2011, Breedlove started his term as Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force. His promotion to general also was effective that day.[9][11]

In July 2012 Breedlove left his position as Vice Chief of Staff to become commander of the United States Air Forces in Europe.

In May 2013 Breedlove assumed command of U.S. European Command and NATO Allied Command Operations as the Supreme Allied Commander Europe. In that capacity, he was stationed at SHAPE Headquarters outside Mons, Belgium.

He is regularly quoted in western media. In July 2013, he told the BBC about his views on the longevity of the Afghan war.[12] In April 2014, he spoke with CNN regarding the Russian troop buildup on the Ukrainian border.[13]

In March 2015 he spoke on Ukrainian 1+1 channel on which he said that Russia has militarized Crimea.[14] In May 2015, he told the Atlantic Council that freedom is being challenged by "a revanchist Russia embarked on a reaching revision of what once were shared hopes for a stable and mutually beneficial partnership."[15] In February 2016, during his testimony before the House Armed Services Committee, he said that "the U.S. military must rebuild in Europe to face a more aggressive Russia, which has chosen to be an adversary and poses a long-term existential threat to the United States".[16]

Breedlove is an Advisory Board Member of Spirit of America, a 501(c)(3) organization that supports the safety and success of Americans serving abroad and the local people and partners they seek to help.[17]

Flight informationEdit

Rating: Command pilot
Flight hours: More than 3,500
Aircraft flown: F-16, T-37 and C-21

Awards and decorations[9]Edit

  US Air Force Command Pilot Badge
  SACEUR Badge
  Joint Chiefs of Staff Badge
  Headquarters Air Force badge
  Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
  Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit with three bronze oak leaf clusters
Defense Meritorious Service Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Meritorious Service Medal with three bronze oak leaf clusters
  Aerial Achievement Medal
  Joint Service Commendation Medal
  Air Force Achievement Medal
Joint Meritorious Unit Award with bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with four bronze oak leaf clusters
Combat Readiness Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
National Defense Service Medal with bronze service star
  Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
  Korea Defense Service Medal
Air Force Overseas Short Tour Service Ribbon with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Air Force Overseas Long Tour Service Ribbon with four bronze oak leaf clusters
Air Force Longevity Service Award with one silver and three bronze oak leaf clusters
  Air Force Training Ribbon
  Commander's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland[18]
  1st Class of the Order of the Cross of the Eagle (Estonia)[19]
  Order of the Golden Fleece (Georgia)[20]
  NATO Meritorious Service Medal
   Inter-American Defense Board Medal with one gold service star

On May 1, 2015, General Breedlove was presented with the Atlantic Council's Distinguished Military Leadership Award.

Effective dates of promotion[9]Edit

Promotions
Insignia Rank Date
  General January 14, 2011
  Lieutenant General  July 21, 2008
  Major General June 23, 2006
  Brigadier General October 1, 2003
  Colonel January 1, 1998
  Lieutenant Colonel June 1, 1993
  Major November 1, 1988
  Captain December 10, 1981
  First Lieutenant December 10, 1979
  Second Lieutenant June 1, 1977

ReferencesEdit

  This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-02-16. Retrieved 2013-02-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ General Philip M. Breedlove
  4. ^ Claudette Roulo (May 10, 2013). "Breedlove Takes Charge at European Command". American Forces Press Service. Stuttgart, Germany: United States Department of Defense. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013.
  5. ^ "General Breedlove becomes the 17th Saceur". May 13, 2013. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013.
  6. ^ http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natohq/news_129181.htm
  7. ^ http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CHRG-113shrg87878/pdf/CHRG-113shrg87878.pdf
  8. ^ "General Philip M. Breedlove (BSCE '77) Appointed Vice Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force". CEE Spotlight. Georgia Tech School of Civil & Environmental Engineering. October 27, 2010. Archived from the original on September 13, 2011. Retrieved July 14, 2011.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "General Phillip M. Breedlove". United States Air Force. Archived from the original on December 12, 2012. Retrieved December 31, 2010.
  10. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-02-27. Retrieved 2013-02-01.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^ "Presidential Nominations 111th Congress (2009–2010) PN2107-111". Retrieved December 31, 2010.
  12. ^ Jonathan Marcus (July 3, 2013). "Nato commander Philip Breedlove on post-Afghan future". BBC News. Archived from the original on July 4, 2013.
  13. ^ Laura Smith-Spark and Susannah Palk (April 3, 2014). "Ukraine crisis: NATO military chief warns Russian troops could supposedly invade swiftly". CNN. Archived from the original on April 3, 2014. Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  14. ^ "Ukraine says rebels attack near Mariupol, NATO deploys Baltic troops". Bangkok Post. AFP. March 10, 2015. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
  15. ^ United States Department of Defense, May 1, 2015: Breedlove: Russia Now Taking ‘Different Path’
  16. ^ "Breedlove: US Must Rebuild Forces in Europe to Confront Russia". Military.com. Retrieved 4 July 2016.
  17. ^ https://spiritofamerica.org/staff/gen-phil-breedlove
  18. ^ NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe Breedlove bestowed Order of the Cross of the Eagle Retrieved March 29, 2016.
  19. ^ Prezydent odznaczył dowódcę sił NATO w Europie Retrieved January 29, 2015.
  20. ^ "Commander of U.S. Forces in Europe Visits Georgia". Civil Georgia. 22 March 2016. Retrieved 1 May 2016.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

Military offices
Preceded by
Gen Carrol H. Chandler
Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force
2011–2012
Succeeded by
Gen Larry O. Spencer
Preceded by
Gen Mark A. Welsh
Commander, United States Air Forces in Europe
2012–2013
Succeeded by
Lt Gen Noel T. Jones
Preceded by
ADM James G. Stavridis
Commander, United States European Command
2013–2016
Succeeded by
GEN Curtis M. Scaparrotti
Preceded by
ADM James G. Stavridis
Supreme Allied Commander Europe
2013–2016
Succeeded by
GEN Curtis M. Scaparrotti