Newcastle Parish, New Brunswick

Newcastle is a civil parish in Northumberland County, New Brunswick, Canada.[2]

Newcastle
Location within Northumberland County, New Brunswick
Location within Northumberland County, New Brunswick
Coordinates: 47°00′N 65°34′W / 47.0°N 65.57°W / 47.0; -65.57
Country Canada
Province New Brunswick
CountyNorthumberland
Erected1786
Area
 • Land578.92 km2 (223.52 sq mi)
Population
 (2016)[1]
 • Total1,136
 • Density2.0/km2 (5/sq mi)
 • Change
2011-2016
Decrease 6.9%
 • Dwellings
522
Time zoneUTC-4 (AST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-3 (ADT)

For governance purposes it is divided between the city of Miramichi,[3] the Indian reserves of Eel Ground 2 and Metepenagiag Uta'nk, and the local service districts of Lower Newcastle-Russellville and the parish of Newcastle.[4] The city and LSDs are members of the Greater Miramichi Regional Service Commission (GMRSC).[5]

Origin of nameEdit

Newcastle and Alnwick Parishes were erected simultaneously. Alnwick and Newcastle are the county town and largest city of historical Northumberland County, England. This may be the origin of the two parishes' names.[6][7]

Another possibility is that the parish was named in honour of the Duke of Newcastle, Prime Minister of Great Britain 1757–1762.[8] The Duke had no obvious connection to the name Alnwick.

HistoryEdit

Newcastle was erected in 1786 as one of Northumberland County's original parishes.[9] including all or part of most parishes in Northumberland and Kent Counties.

BoundariesEdit

Newcastle Parish is bounded:[2][10][11][12]

  • on the north by the Gloucester County line;
  • on the east by a line beginning on the county line at a point about 3.3 kilometres west-southwesterly of Route 8, then running south[a] to the Route 8 bridge over the Bartibog River, then down the Bartibog River to its mouth;
  • on the south by the Miramichi River and Northwest Miramichi River;
  • on the west by a line beginning on southeastern corner of a grant to Oliver Willard on the western side of Jones Cove, then running north[a] to the county line;
  • including Bartibog Island in the Miramichi.

Evolution of boundariesEdit

The original boundaries of Newcastle were Westmorland County on the south, a line due west from the northern tip of Portage Island on the north, and a north-south line through the mouth of Cains River on the west.

In 1814 Northumberland County was completely reorganised and Newcastle took on a more recognisable shape.[16] The boundary with Northesk was different, starting near the old courthouse and passing through the intersection of Newcastle Boulevard and Beaverbrook Road.

In 1824 the boundary with Northesk was moved west to its modern starting point on Jones Cove.[17] The direction of the boundary was also changed to run north instead of prolongation a grant line, which transferred a triangle of territory in the south to Newcastle and a triangle in the north to Northesk.

In 1850 the boundary with Alnwick Parish was adjusted by running further up the Bartibog River before turning north.[13]

CommunitiesEdit

Communities at least partly within the parish;[10][11][12] bold indicates an incorporated municipality or Indian reserve; italics indicate a name no longer in official use

Bodies of waterEdit

Bodies of water[b] at least partly in the parish:[10][11][12]

IslandsEdit

Islands in the parish:[10][11][12]

  • Bartibog Island

DemographicsEdit

Parish population total does not include Eel Ground 2 Indian reserve and portion within Miramichi

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b By the magnet of 1850,[13] when declination in the area was between 20º and 21º west of north.[14] The Territorial Division Act clause referring to magnetic direction bearings was omitted in the 1952[15] and 1973 Revised Statutes.[2]
  2. ^ Not including brooks, ponds or coves.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Census Profile, 2016 Census: Newcastle, Parish [Census subdivision], New Brunswick". Statistics Canada. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c "Chapter T-3 Territorial Division Act". Government of New Brunswick. Retrieved 13 November 2020.
  3. ^ "New Brunswick Regulation 85-6 under the Municipalities Act (O.C. 85-45)". Government of New Brunswick. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  4. ^ "New Brunswick Regulation 84-168 under the Municipalities Act (O.C. 84-582)". Government of New Brunswick. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  5. ^ "Communities in each of the 12 Regional Service Commissions (RSC) / Les communautés dans chacune des 12 Commissions de services régionaux (CSR)" (PDF), Government of New Brunswick, July 2017, retrieved 2 February 2021
  6. ^ Ganong, William F. (1896). A Monograph of the Place-Nomenclature of the Province of New Brunswick. Royal Society of Canada. p. 217. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  7. ^ "Alnwick Parish". Place Names of New Brunswick: Where is Home? New Brunswick Communities Past and Present. Provincial Archives of New Brunswick. Retrieved 26 March 2021.
  8. ^ "Newcastle Parish". Place Names of New Brunswick: Where is Home? New Brunswick Communities Past and Present. Provincial Archives of New Brunswick. Retrieved 26 March 2021.
  9. ^ "26 Geo. III Chapter I. An Act for the better ascertaining and confirming the Boundaries of the several Counties within this Province, and for subdividing them into Towns or Parishes.". Acts of the General Assembly of His Majesty's Province of New-Brunswick, passed in the year 1786. Saint John, New Brunswick: Government of New Brunswick. 1786. pp. 3–12. Retrieved 20 March 2021.
  10. ^ a b c d "No. 51". Provincial Archives of New Brunswick. Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development. Retrieved 18 June 2021. Remainder of parish on maps 52, 60, 61, and 69 at same site.
  11. ^ a b c d "134" (PDF). Transportation and Infrastructure. Government of New Brunswick. Retrieved 18 June 2021. Remainder of parish on mapbooks 155, 156, 172–174, 188–190, 203, and 204 at same site.
  12. ^ a b c d "Search the Canadian Geographical Names Database (CGNDB)". Government of Canada. Retrieved 18 June 2021.
  13. ^ a b "13 Vic. c. 51 An Act to consolidate all the Laws now in force for the division of the Province into Counties, Towns and Parishes.". Acts of the General Assembly of Her Mjaesty's Province of New Brunswick, Passed in the Year 1850. Fredericton: Government of New Brunswick. 1850. pp. 142–152, 145–149. Retrieved 27 March 2021. Book was poorly proofread, resulting in title typo and reuse of page numbers 145–152.
  14. ^ "Historical Magnetic Declination". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 13 March 2021.
  15. ^ "Chapter 227 Territorial Division Act". The Revised Statutes of New Brunswick 1952 Volume III. Fredericton: Government of New Brunswick. 1952. pp. 3725–3771.
  16. ^ "54 Geo. III c. 17 An Act in further addition to an Act, intituled 'An Act for the better ascertaining and confirming the boundaries of the several Counties, within this Province, and for subdividing them into Towns or Parishes.'". Acts of the General Assembly of His Majesty's Province of New-Brunswick; Passed in the Year 1814. Saint John, New Brunswick: Government of New Brunswick. 1814. pp. 16–18. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  17. ^ "5 Geo. IV c. 20 An Act to alter the Division Line between the Parishes of New-Castle and Northesk, in the County of Northumberland.". Acts of the General Assembly of His Majesty's Province of New-Brunswick, Passed in the Year 1824. Fredericton: Government of New Brunswick. 1824. pp. 44–45. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  18. ^ Statistics Canada: 1996, 2001, 2006 census
  19. ^ 2011 Statistics Canada Census Profile: Newcastle Parish, New Brunswick



Coordinates: 47°00′00″N 65°34′12″W / 47.00000°N 65.57000°W / 47.00000; -65.57000 (Newcastle Parish, New Brunswick)