Muttahida Qaumi Movement – Pakistan

Muttahida Qaumi Movement (Pakistan)[5] (Urdu: متحدہ قومی موومنٹ (پاکستان) Muttaḥidah Qọ̄mī Mūwmaṅṫ Pākistān abbr. MQM) is a political party in Pakistan. The leader of the party is Khalid Maqbool Siddiqui.[5]

Muttahida Qaumi Movement (Pakistan)
متحدہ قومی موومنٹ(پاکستان)
United National Movement (Pakistan)
AbbreviationMQM
ConvenerKhalid Maqbool Siddiqui
Deputy ConvenerAmir Khan
FounderFarooq Sattar
Founded23 August 2016 (6 years ago) (2016-08-23)
Split fromMuttahida Qaumi Movement – London
Preceded byMuttahida Qaumi Movement
HeadquartersBahadurabad, Karachi
Student wingAPMSO
(Pakistan faction)[1][2]
Charity WingKhidmat-e-Khalq Foundation[3]
IdeologyPakistani nationalism[1]
Muhajir interests[4]
Secularism
National affiliationPakistan Democratic Movement
ColorsRed, green and white
   
Senate
3 / 100
National Assembly
6 / 342
Sindh Assembly
21 / 168
Election symbol
Kite
Kite.svg
Party flag
Flag of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement.svg
Website
www.mqmpakistan.org

HistoryEdit

It came into existence due to split within Muttahida Qaumi Movement, and was founded as a separate party by Farooq Sattar, who split it from MQM founder and leader Altaf Hussain. The faction was announced after Sattar's release from custody by the Pakistan Rangers, a paramilitary organization.[6]

Election campaignsEdit

MQM-P participated in two major by-elections since its formation, but was defeated in both.[7][8]

Senate of PakistanEdit

Election Leader Seats Position Resulting Coalition
# ±
2018 Khalid Maqbool Siddiqui
5 / 104
  1 5th Opposition coalition
2021 Khalid Maqbool Siddiqui
3 / 100
  2 6th Opposition coalition

National AssemblyEdit

Election Leader Votes Seats Position Resulting Coalition
# % # ±
2018 Khalid Maqbool Siddiqui 733,245 1.38
7 / 342
  17 8th PTI coalition

Sindh AssemblyEdit

Election Leader Votes Seats Position Resulting Coalition
2018 Khalid Maqbool Siddiqui 773,951 -
21 / 165
  31 3rd Opposition coalition

Merger with PSPEdit

On 8 November 2017, MQM Pakistan and Pak Sarzameen Party announced an "establishment-sponsored"[9][10] merger.[11][12][13]

Party desertionEdit

Many MQM lawmakers left the Sattar faction, including deputy mayor Arshad Vohra.[14][15][16][17][18]

PIB vs Bahadurabad factionEdit

MQM-Pakistan further divided into Farooq Sattar (PIB) and Bahadurabad factions.[19]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "The all influential APMSO is now a shadow of its former self". The News International (newspaper). 15 June 2020. Retrieved 16 October 2021.
  2. ^ "MQM-P denies PPP's claim of several APMSO activists joining it". The News International (newspaper). 26 April 2021. Retrieved 16 October 2021.
  3. ^ "MQM-P revives charity wing to help lockdown affectees". Geo News. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 18 September 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "Farooq Sattar's MQM struggles to step out of Altaf's shadow - The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 15 October 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2018.
  5. ^ a b "LIST OF ENLISTED POLITICAL PARTIES" (PDF). www.ecp.gov.pk. Election Commission of Pakistan. Retrieved 21 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ "Farooq Sattar's MQM struggles to step out of Altaf's shadow - The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 15 October 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2018.
  7. ^ "Clash erupts among MQM workers after PS-114 defeat - Pakistan - Dunya News". dunyanews.tv. Retrieved 11 July 2017.
  8. ^ "PS-127: MQM Pakistan loses first battle after 'disconnect' from London". www.geo.tv. Retrieved 11 July 2017.
  9. ^ Dawn.com (11 November 2017). "Establishment brokered MQM-PSP alliance meet at Sattar's request: Mustafa Kamal".
  10. ^ Dawn.com (11 November 2017). "MQM-P leaders, supporters pay respects at 'Martyrs' Monument' in Karachi".
  11. ^ Ali, Dawn.com | Imtiaz (8 November 2017). "'One manifesto, one symbol, one party': MQM, PSP announce plans for 2018 elections". DAWN.COM. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  12. ^ Khosa, Tariq (22 February 2016). "Power of the establishment".
  13. ^ "Democracy versus 'the establishment' in Pakistan".
  14. ^ "Another MQM lawmaker jumps ship to join Kamal-led PSP". Daily Pakistan Global. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  15. ^ "Ali Raza Abidi quits MQM-P". www.geo.tv. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  16. ^ "MQM-P all set to seek ex-party MPs de-seating". The Nation. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  17. ^ "MQM-Pakistan's Arshad Vohra joins Pak Sarzameen Party - The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 29 October 2017. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  18. ^ "Several MQM-P members likely to join PPP - Pakistan - Dunya News". Dunya News. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  19. ^ "Sattar, Amir lead separate MQM-P sessions after differences over Senate tickets". ARYNEWS. Retrieved 6 February 2018.

External linksEdit