Marijnen cabinet

The Marijnen cabinet was the executive branch of the Dutch Government from 24 July 1963 until 14 April 1965. The cabinet was a continuation of the previous De Quay cabinet and was formed by the Christian-democratic Catholic People's Party (KVP), Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP) and Christian Historical Union (CHU) and the conservative-liberal People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) after the election of 1963. The cabinet was a centre-right coalition and had a substantial majority in the House of Representatives with prominent Catholic politician Victor Marijnen the Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries in the previous cabinet serving as Prime Minister. Protestant Leader Barend Biesheuvel served as Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries and was given the portfolio of Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs.

Marijnen cabinet
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
49th Cabinet of the Netherlands
Kabinet-Marijnen (1).jpg ZetelsMarijnen.svg
The installation of the Marijnen cabinet on 24 July 1963
Date formed24 July 1963 (1963-07-24)
Date dissolved14 April 1965 (1965-04-14)
1 year, 264 days in office
(Demissionary from 27 February 1965 (1965-02-27))
People and organisations
MonarchQueen Juliana
Prime MinisterVictor Marijnen
Deputy Prime MinisterBarend Biesheuvel
No. of ministers14
Member partyCatholic People's Party
(KVP)
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy

(VVD)
Anti-Revolutionary Party
(ARP)
Christian Historical Union
(CHU)
Status in legislatureCentre-right
Majority government
Opposition partyLabour Party
Opposition leaderAnne Vondeling
History
Election(s)1963 election
Legislature term(s)1963–1967
Incoming formation1963 formation
Outgoing formation1965 formation
PredecessorDe Quay cabinet
SuccessorCals cabinet

The cabinet served in the middle of the tumultuous 1960s, domestically it had to deal with the counterculture and economic changes following the discovery of the Groningen gas field and it had to deal with the fallout of the marriage between Princess Irene and carlist Carlos Hugo of Bourbon-Parma and it was able to implement several major social reforms to health insurance and the public broadcasting system, internationally the disbandment of the Netherlands New Guinea was finalized. The cabinet suffered several major internal conflicts, and fell just 19 months into its term on 27 February 1965 following a conflict over the implantation of Commercial Broadcasting and continued in a demissionary capacity until it was replaced with the Cals cabinet.[1][2]

TermEdit

The natural gas reserves, recently found in Slochteren were a considerable boost for the economy. This, combined with labour shortage led to a rise in wages and the attraction of foreign workers. Despite this being the second cabinet without socialist Labour Party, the building up of a welfare state, that was started after World War II, continued with the introduction of minimum wages in 1964 and the national health service.

In 1965, measures were taken against commercial television stations transmitting from the North Sea. The cabinet finally fell over the issue if commercial TV should be allowed in the Netherlands.

 
French Minister of Foreign Affairs Maurice Couve de Murville and Minister Joseph Luns at a NATO conference in The Hague on 12 May 1964.
 
American Ambassador at Large Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. and Prime Minister Victor Marijnen at the Catshuis on 20 August 1964.

Cabinet MembersEdit

Ministers Title/Ministry/Portfolio(s) Term of office Party
  Victor Marijnen
(1917–1975)
Prime Minister General Affairs 24 July 1963 –
14 April 1965
Catholic
People's Party
  Barend Biesheuvel
(1920–2001)
Deputy
Prime Minister
Agriculture and
Fisheries
24 July 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
Minister
Minister Interior Suriname and
Netherlands
Antilles Affairs
  Edzo Toxopeus
(1918–2009)
Minister Interior 19 May 1959 –
14 April 1965
[Retained]
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
  Joseph Luns
(1911–2002)
Minister Foreign Affairs 13 October 1956 –
6 July 1971
[Retained] [Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Dr.
Johan Witteveen
(1921–2019)
Minister Finance 24 July 1963 –
14 April 1965
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
  Ynso Scholten
(1918–1984)
Minister Justice 24 July 1963 –
14 April 1965
Christian
Historical Union
  Dr.
Koos Andriessen
(1928–2019)
Minister Economic Affairs 24 July 1963 –
14 April 1965
Christian
Historical Union
  Captain
Piet de Jong
(1915–2016)
Minister Defence 24 July 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Dr.
Gerard Veldkamp
(1921–1990)
Minister Social Affairs
and Health
17 July 1961 –
5 April 1967
[Retained] [Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Theo Bot
(1911–1984)
Minister Education, Arts
and Sciences
24 July 1963 –
14 April 1965
Catholic
People's Party
  Jan van Aartsen
(1909–1992)
Minister Transport and
Water Management
24 July 1963 –
14 April 1965
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Pieter Bogaers
(1924–2008)
Minister Housing and
Construction
24 July 1963 –
14 April 1965
Catholic
People's Party
  Jo Schouwenaar-
Franssen

(1909–1995)
Minister Social Work 24 July 1963 –
14 April 1965
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
State Secretaries Title/Ministry/Portfolio(s) Term of office Party
  Leo de Block
(1904–1988)
State Secretary Foreign Affairs European Union
Benelux
3 September 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Dr.
Isaäc Nicolaas
Diepenhorst

(1907–1976)
Development
Cooperation

United Nations
International
Organizations
28 September 1963 –
14 April 1965
Christian
Historical Union
  Dr.
Willem Hendrik
van den Berge

(1905–1987)
State Secretary Finance Fiscal Policy
Tax and Customs
Governmental
Budget
27 May 1959 –
14 April 1965
[Retained]
Independent
Social Democrat
  Joop Bakker
(1921–2003)
State Secretary Economic Affairs Small and
Medium-sized
Businesses

Regional
Development
3 September 1963 –
22 November 1966
[Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Major general
Joop Haex
(1911–2002)
State Secretary Defence Army 14 August 1963 –
14 April 1965
Christian
Historical Union
  Rear admiral
Adri van Es
(1913–1994)
Navy 14 August 1963 –
16 September 1972
[Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Major general
Willem den Toom
(1911–1998)
Air Force 25 November 1963 –
14 April 1965
Catholic
People's Party
  Dr.
Louis Bartels
(1915–2002)
State Secretary Social Affairs
and Health
Primary
Healthcare

Elderly Care
Disability Policy
Medical Ethics
3 September 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Dr.
José de Meijer
(1915–2000)
Occupational
Safety

Public
Organisations
15 November 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Hans Grosheide
(born 1930)
State Secretary Education and
Sciences
Primary
Education

Secondary
Education

Special
Education
3 September 1963 –
6 July 1971
[Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Louis van de Laar
(1921–2004)
• Social Services
Youth Care
Media
Culture
Art
• Recreation
Sport
24 October 1963 –
14 April 1965
Catholic
People's Party
  Mike Keyzer
(1911–1983)
State Secretary Transport and
Water Management
Public
Transport

Aviation
Rail Transport
Weather
Forecasting
22 October 1963 –
14 April 1965
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
Retained from the previous cabinet
Continued in the next cabinet

TriviaEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Na 9 weken een nieuwe regering (1963)" (in Dutch). Nederlands Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid (YouTube). 25 May 2010. Retrieved 28 May 2018.
  2. ^ "Marijnen, Victor Gerard Marie (1917-1975)" (in Dutch). Huygens ING. 12 November 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2019.

External linksEdit

Official