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The Letta Cabinet was the 62nd cabinet of the Italian Republic. In office from 28 April 2013 to 22 January 2014, it comprised ministers of the Democratic Party (PD), The People of Freedom (PdL), Civic Choice (SC), the Union of the Centre (UdC), one of the Italian Radicals (Rad) and three non-party independents.

Letta Cabinet
Flag of Italy.svg
62nd cabinet of Italy
Enrico Letta 2013.jpg
Date formed28 April 2013 (2013-04-28)
Date dissolved22 February 2014 (2014-02-22) (301 days)
People and organisations
Head of stateGiorgio Napolitano
Head of governmentEnrico Letta
No. of ministers22 (incl. Prime Minister)
Member partiesUntil November 2013:
PD, PdL, SC, UdC, Rad
Since November 2013:
PD, NCD, SC, PpI, UdC, Rad
Status in legislatureGrand coalition
Opposition partiesM5S, LN, SEL, FdI, FI (since Nov. 2013)
History
Election(s)2013 election
Legislature term(s)XVII Legislature (2013–2018)
PredecessorMonti Cabinet
SuccessorRenzi Cabinet

The government was referred to by journalists as a grand coalition (Italian: grande coalizione)[1] and/or government of broad agreements (Italian: governo di larghe intese).[2] At formation, the cabinet benefited from a supermajority in the Italian Parliament, one of the largest in the history of the Italian Republic. The cabinet was the youngest government so far, with a median age of 53.[3] It was sworn in on 28 April 2013 and won the confidence vote in both the Chamber of Deputies on 29 April[4] and the Senate on 30 April.[5][6]

Contents

Formation and endEdit

 
Letta's government during the oath.

The 2013 general election, held on 24–25 February, saw the rise of the Five Star Movement (M5S) and the lack of a common majority in both houses of Parliament. More specifically, the centre-left coalition (Italy. Common Good) was ahead of the centre-right coalition, but controlled a majority only in the Chamber of Deputies. The election was followed by weeks of deadlock, including various failed attempts either to elect a President to succeed Giorgio Napolitano and form a government, the establishment of a panel of experts by the President himself (the so-called "wise men") in order to outline priorities and formulate an agenda to deal with the persistent economic hardship and growing unemployment, and, ultimately, the resignation of Pier Luigi Bersani from secretary of the Democratic Party (PD).

On 22 April 2013 Napolitano, after being re-elected for an unprecedented second term, immediately started consultations. Two days later, the President gave Enrico Letta, deputy-secretary of the PD, the task of forming a government, having determined that Bersani could not.[7][8] Letta succeeded Mario Monti, who had resigned on 21 December 2012, but whose government remained in charge for ordinary administration until 28 April 2013, the day the new government was sworn in. During the ceremony, a man fired shots outside Palazzo Chigi and wounded two Carabinieri.[9] The cabinet was composed mainly by four parties: the PD, The People of Freedom (PdL), Civic Choice (SC) and the Union of the Centre (UdC). The fact that the new Prime Minister was a nephew of Gianni Letta, one of the most trusted advisors to Silvio Berlusconi, the leader of the PdL, was perceived as a way of overcoming the bitter hostility between the two opposing camps.[10]

However, on 28 September, Berlusconi asked his party's five ministers to resign from the government over a tax hike.[11] On 15 November 2013, Berlusconi, who would be soon stripped of his seat in the Senate with PD's votes due to his conviction for tax fraud,[12] announced the re-foundation of Forza Italia (FI), in opposition to the government, and the PdL split.[13] In fact, all five PdL ministers, led by Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Interior Angelino Alfano, joined the New Centre-Right (NCD) party.[14] The same week, also SC suffered a split, with its minister Mario Mauro leaving the party, founding the Populars for Italy (PpI) and, nevertheless, keeping his post.[15]

The Letta Cabinet lasted until 22 February 2014 (for a total of 300 days). The government fell apart after the PD retired its support. Since December 2013 the party had been led by Matteo Renzi, the 39-year-old mayor of Florence nicknamed "the scrapper". Renzi succeeded Letta and formed the Renzi Cabinet.

Party breakdownEdit

Beginning of termEdit

MinistersEdit

10
5
3
2
1
1

Ministers and other membersEdit

End of termEdit

MinistersEdit

9
4
3
1
1
1
1

Ministers and other membersEdit

CompositionEdit

Composition of the Council of MinistersEdit

Beginning of termEdit

Cabinet Name Party
Prime Minister Enrico Letta Democratic Party
Deputy Prime Minister Angelino Alfano The People of Freedom
Secretary of the Council of Ministers Filippo Patroni Griffi Independent
Minister of Foreign Affairs Emma Bonino Italian Radicals
Minister of the Interior Angelino Alfano The People of Freedom
Minister of Justice Anna Maria Cancellieri Independent
Minister of Defence Mario Mauro Civic Choice
Minister of Economy and Finance Fabrizio Saccomanni Independent
Minister of Economic Development Flavio Zanonato Democratic Party
Minister of Infrastructure and Transport Maurizio Lupi The People of Freedom
Minister of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies Nunzia De Girolamo The People of Freedom
Minister of the Environment Andrea Orlando Democratic Party
Minister of Labour and Social Policies Enrico Giovannini Independent
Minister of Education, University and Research Maria Chiara Carrozza Democratic Party
Minister of Culture and Tourism Massimo Bray Democratic Party
Minister of Health Beatrice Lorenzin The People of Freedom
Minister of European Affairs Enzo Moavero Milanesi Civic Choice
Minister of Regional Affairs Graziano Delrio Democratic Party
Minister of Territorial Cohesion Carlo Trigilia Democratic Party
Minister for Parliamentary Relations Dario Franceschini Democratic Party
Minister for Constitutional Reforms Gaetano Quagliariello The People of Freedom
Minister for Integration Cécile Kyenge Democratic Party
Minister of Equal Opportunities, Sport and Youth Policies Josefa Idem Democratic Party
Minister of Public Administration Gianpiero D'Alia Union of the Centre

End of termEdit

Cabinet Name Party
Prime Minister Enrico Letta Democratic Party
Deputy Prime Minister Angelino Alfano New Centre-Right
Secretary of the Council of Ministers Filippo Patroni Griffi Independent
Minister of Foreign Affairs Emma Bonino Italian Radicals
Minister of the Interior Angelino Alfano New Centre-Right
Minister of Justice Anna Maria Cancellieri Independent
Minister of Defence Mario Mauro Populars for Italy
Minister of Economy and Finance Fabrizio Saccomanni Independent
Minister of Economic Development Flavio Zanonato Democratic Party
Minister of Infrastructure and Transport Maurizio Lupi New Centre-Right
Minister of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies Enrico Letta (ad interim) Democratic Party
Minister of the Environment Andrea Orlando Democratic Party
Minister of Labour and Social Policies Enrico Giovannini Independent
Minister of Education, University and Research Maria Chiara Carrozza Democratic Party
Minister of Culture and Tourism Massimo Bray Democratic Party
Minister of Health Beatrice Lorenzin New Centre-Right
Minister of European Affairs Enzo Moavero Milanesi Civic Choice
Minister of Regional Affairs Graziano Delrio Democratic Party
Minister of Territorial Cohesion Carlo Trigilia Democratic Party
Minister for Parliamentary Relations Dario Franceschini Democratic Party
Minister for Constitutional Reforms Gaetano Quagliariello New Centre-Right
Minister for Integration Cécile Kyenge Democratic Party
Minister of Public Administration Gianpiero D'Alia Union of the Centre

Composition of the GovernmentEdit

Letta Government
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Portrait Office Name Term Party Deputy Ministers
Undersecretaries
 
Prime Minister
Enrico Letta
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Undersecretaries:
Filippo Patroni Griffi (Ind.)
Giovanni Legnini (PD)
Marco Minniti (PD)
 
Deputy Prime Minister
Angelino Alfano
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 November 2013:
The People of Freedom
 
Secretary of the Council of Ministers
Filippo Patroni Griffi
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
Ministers
 
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Emma Bonino
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Italian Radicals
Deputy Ministers:
Lapo Pistelli (PD)
Marta Dassù (PD)
Bruno Archi (FI)[a]
(until 3 December 2013)
Undersecretaries:
Mario Giro (PpI)[b]
 
Minister of the Interior
Angelino Alfano
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 November 2013:
The People of Freedom
Deputy Ministers:
Filippo Bubbico (PD)
Undersecretaries:
Domenico Manzione (Ind.)
Gianpiero Bocci (PD)
 
Minister of Justice
Anna Maria Cancellieri
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
Undersecretaries:
Giuseppe Berretta (PD)
Cosimo Ferri (Ind.)
 
Minister of Defense
Mario Mauro
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Populars for Italy
before 23 November 2013:
Civic Choice
Undersecretaries:
Roberta Pinotti (PD)
Gioacchino Alfano (NCD)[a]
 
Minister of Economy and Finance
Fabrizio Saccomanni
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
Deputy Ministers:
Luigi Casero (NCD)[a]
Stefano Fassina (PD)
(until 4 January 2014)
Undersecretaries:
Pier Paolo Baretta (PD)
Alberto Giorgetti (NCD)[a]
 
Minister of Economic Development
Flavio Zanonato
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Deputy Ministers:
Carlo Calenda (SC)
Antonio Catricalà (Ind.)
Undersecretaries:
Simona Vicari (NCD)[a]
Claudio De Vincenti (PD)
 
Minister of Infrastructure and Transport
Maurizio Lupi
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 November 2013:
The People of Freedom
Deputy Ministers:
Vincenzo De Luca (PD)
Undersecretaries:
Erasmo De Angelis (PD)
Rocco Girlanda (NCD)[a]
 
Minister of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies
Nunzia De Girolamo
28 April 2013 – 27 January 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 November 2013:
The People of Freedom
Undersecretaries:
Maurizio Martina (PD)
Giuseppe Castiglione (NCD)[a]
 
Enrico Letta
(ad interim)
27 January 2014 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
 
Minister of the Environment
Andrea Orlando
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Undersecretaries:
Marco Flavio Cirillo (FI)[a]
 
Minister of Labour and Social Policies
Enrico Giovannini
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
Deputy Ministers:
Maria Cecilia Guerra (PD)
Undersecretaries:
Carlo Dell'Aringa (PD)
Jole Santelli (FI)[a]
(until 6 December 2013)
 
Minister of Education, University and Research
Maria Chiara Carrozza
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Undersecretaries:
Gabriele Toccafondi (NCD)[a]
Marco Rossi-Doria (Ind.)
Gianluca Galletti (UDC)
 
Minister of Culture and Tourism
Massimo Bray
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Undersecretaries:
Simonetta Giordani (Ind.)
Ilaria Borletti Buitoni (SC)
 
Minister of Health
Beatrice Lorenzin
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 November 2013:
The People of Freedom
Undersecretaries:
Paolo Fadda (PD)
Ministers without portfolio
 
Minister of European Affairs
Enzo Moavero Milanesi
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Civic Choice
 
Minister of Regional Affairs
Graziano Delrio
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Undersecretaries:
Walter Ferrazza (FI)[c]
(until 2 December 2013)
 
Minister of Territorial Cohesion
Carlo Trigilia
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
 
Minister for Parliamentary Relations and Coordination of Governamental Activity
Dario Franceschini
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Undersecretaries:
Sesa Amici (PD)
Sabrina De Camillis (NCD)[a]
 
Minister for Constitutional Reforms
Gaetano Quagliariello
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 November 2013:
The People of Freedom
 
Minister for Integration
Cécile Kyenge
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
 
Minister of Equal Opportunities, Sport and Youth Policies
Josefa Idem
28 April 2013 – 24 June 2013
Democratic Party
 
Minister of Public Administration
Gianpiero D'Alia
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Union of the Centre
Undersecretaries:
Gianfranco Micciché (FI)[d]
(until 29 November 2013)
Michaela Biancofiore (FI)[a]
(until 1 October 2013)
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l before 16 November 2013: PdL
  2. ^ before 10 December 2013: SC
  3. ^ before 16 November 2013: MIR
  4. ^ before 16 November 2013: GS

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Letta: Grande coalizione, bisogna farsene una ragione
  2. ^ Twitter, Gabriella Colarusso (20 April 2013). "Napolitano bis: verso un governo di larghe intese". Lettera43.
  3. ^ Dionisi, Brenda (9 May 2013). "It's a governissimo!". The Florentine (183). Retrieved 12 May 2013.
  4. ^ "Premier Enrico Letta wins confidence vote in House". ANSA. 29 April 2013. Retrieved 20 June 2013.
  5. ^ "Letta wins Senate confidence too". ANSA. 30 April 2013. Retrieved 20 June 2013.
  6. ^ "Factbox: Key ministers in Enrico Letta's new Italian government". Reuters. 27 April 2013. Retrieved 27 April 2013.
  7. ^ Frye, Andrew (24 April 2013). "Letta Named Italian Prime Minister as Impasse Ends". Bloomberg. Retrieved 26 April 2013.
  8. ^ "Italy PM-designate Enrico Letta agrees new government". BBC. 27 April 2013. Retrieved 27 April 2013.
  9. ^ "New Italian 'grand coalition' government sworn in". BBC News. 28 April 2013. Retrieved 28 April 2013.
  10. ^ "Bridge-builder Enrico Letta seals Silvio Berlusconi deal". The Australian. 29 April 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013.
  11. ^ Berlusconi fa dimettere i ministri Letta: gesto folle per motivi personali Corriere della Sera
  12. ^ "Berlusconi expelled from Italian parliament over tax fraud". 27 November 2013 – via www.reuters.com.
  13. ^ "Silvio Berlusconi's heir Angelino Alfano forms new party in Italy", The Independent, 15 November 2013
  14. ^ "Alfano lancia il Nuovo centrodestra: "No a Fi per me scelta dolorosa. No a decadenza Berlusconi"", Il Messaggero, 16 November 2013
  15. ^ "Mauro presenta i Popolari per l'Italia: "Elettori in comune con Ncd, ma idee diverse"", Corriere della Sera, 23 November 2013

External linksEdit