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The Government of the 31st Dáil is the previous Government of Ireland, formed after the 2011 general election to Dáil Éireann on 25 February 2011. Fine Gael entered into discussions with the Labour Party which culminated in a joint programme for government. The 31st Dáil first met on 9 March 2011 when it nominated Seán Barrett to be the Ceann Comhairle.[1] Following this, the house nominated Enda Kenny, the leader of Fine Gael, to be the 13th Taoiseach. Kenny then went to the Áras an Uachtaráin where President Mary McAleese appointed him as Taoiseach. On the nomination of the Taoiseach, and following the Dáil's approval the 29th Government of Ireland was appointed by the President.[2][3][4][5]

Government of the 31st Dáil
29th Government of Ireland
Enda Kenny EPP 2014 (cropped).jpg
Date formed9 March 2011
Date dissolved10 March 2016
People and organisations
Head of stateMary McAleese (2011)
Michael D. Higgins (2011–16)
Head of governmentEnda Kenny
Deputy head of governmentEamon Gilmore (2011–14)
Joan Burton (2014–16)
No. of ministers15
Member partiesFine Gael
Labour Party
Status in legislatureMajority Coalition
Opposition cabinetFirst Martin front bench
Opposition partyFianna Fáil
Opposition leaderMicheál Martin
History
Election(s)2011 general election
Legislature term(s)31st Dáil
Budget(s)2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Outgoing formation2016 government formation
Predecessor28th Government
Successor30th Government

29th Government of IrelandEdit

 
Members of the Government of the 31st Dáil

The 29th Government of Ireland (9 March 2011 – 10 March 2016) was composed of Fine Gael and the Labour Party.

Nomination of Taoiseach voteEdit

9 March 2011
Nomination of Taoiseach vote for Enda Kenny (FG)

Motion proposed by Simon Harris and seconded by Ciara Conway
Absolute majority: 84/166
Vote Parties Votes
 Y Yes Fine Gael (76), Labour Party (37), Independent (5)
117 / 166
No Sinn Féin (14), Independent (8), People Before Profit Alliance (2), Socialist Party (2),
Workers and Unemployed Action Group (1)
27 / 166
Abstentions Fianna Fáil (20), Ceann Comhairle (1), Independent (1)
22 / 166
Source: Oireachtas Debates

Composition of the GovernmentEdit

The Ministers of the Government were approved by the Dáil on 9 March 2011.[6][7]

Office Name Term Party
Taoiseach Enda Kenny 2011–16 Fine Gael
Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore 2011–14 Labour Party
Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade[8]
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan 2011–16 Fine Gael
Minister for Education and Skills Ruairi Quinn 2011–14 Labour Party
Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform[9] Brendan Howlin 2011–16
Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation[10] Richard Bruton Fine Gael
Minister for Social Protection Joan Burton Labour Party
Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht[11] Jimmy Deenihan 2011–14 Fine Gael
Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte Labour Party
Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government[12] Phil Hogan Fine Gael
Minister for Justice and Equality[13] Alan Shatter 2011–14
Minister for Defence
Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine[14] Simon Coveney 2011–16
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs[15] Frances Fitzgerald 2011–14
Minister for Health[16] James Reilly
Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport[17] Leo Varadkar

Changes May 2014Edit

There was a reshuffle after the resignation of Alan Shatter.[18]

Minister for Justice and Equality Frances Fitzgerald 2014–16 Fine Gael
Minister for Defence Enda Kenny (acting) 2014
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Charles Flanagan 2014

Changes July 2014Edit

Following the election of Joan Burton as Leader of the Labour Party, a cabinet reshuffle took place on 11 July 2014.[19]

Tánaiste Joan Burton 2014–16 Labour Party
Minister for Defence Simon Coveney Fine Gael
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs James Reilly Fine Gael
Minister for Health Leo Varadkar Fine Gael
Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade Charles Flanagan Fine Gael
Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Alex White Labour Party
Minister for Education and Skills Jan O'Sullivan Labour Party
Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government Alan Kelly Labour Party
Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Paschal Donohoe Fine Gael
Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Heather Humphreys Fine Gael

The following attended cabinet meetings, but did not have a vote:

Office Name Term Party
Attorney General Máire Whelan 2011–16 Labour Party
Government Chief Whip Paul Kehoe 2011–16 Fine Gael
Minister of State for Housing and Planning Jan O'Sullivan 2011–14 Labour Party
Minister of State for Business and Employment Ged Nash[20] 2014–16 Labour Party

Economic Management CouncilEdit

The Economic Management Council was a cabinet subcommittee of senior ministers formed to co-ordinate the response to the Irish financial crisis and the government's dealings with the troika (European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund).[21] Its members were the Taoiseach, the Tánaiste, the Minister for Finance, and the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform.[22] It was supported by the Department of the Taoiseach, led by Dermot McCarthy.[21][23] Brigid Laffan compared it to a war cabinet.[24] Opposition parties suggested the Council represented a dangerous concentration of power.[25]

Following the formation of a government in 2016, Shane Ross, a member of the Government of the 32nd Dáil, confirmed in an address to the Dáil that the subcommittee would not form part of the new government. Ross told the Dáil on 6 May 2016: "I had a conversation last night with the Taoiseach. I was talking to him about Dáil reform and I asked him about an issue - a last point I had forgotten to ask about earlier - which was the abolition of the Economic Management Council. I thought it was going to be like one of these thorny topics which we had been through over the last few weeks. He told me okay, it is gone, that it had been needed for a particular time and it is not needed any more and I was to consider it gone. To me that was very encouraging because it meant that one of those obstacles to Dáil reform, one of those rather secretive bodies that had dictated to the Cabinet and to the Dáil the agenda of what came out to the country, was now a thing of the past."[26]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Dáil Éireann debate - Wednesday, 9 Mar 2011: Election of Ceann Comhairle". Houses of the Oireachtas. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  2. ^ "Dáil Éireann debate - Wednesday, 9 Mar 2011: Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government". Houses of the Oireachtas. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  3. ^ Under Article 13.1.1º of the 1937 Constitution of Ireland, the Dáil nominates a person whom it instructs the President to appoint as Taoiseach. The Taoiseach, following his appointment, then nominates his ministerial team en bloc to the Dáil for approval, in accordance with Article 13.1.2º. If the Dáil duly approves the list, the President proceeds to appoint them. Though it is often said that the Taoiseach and government are elected by the Dáil that is technically incorrect. They only become ministers when the President appoints them and they receive their seal of office, not by means of the parliamentary vote, although the President's appointment is automatic when they have been duly approved.
  4. ^ "Enda Kenny reveals new Cabinet". RTÉ News. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 10 March 2011.
  5. ^ "Taoiseach names new Cabinet". Irish Government News Service. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 10 March 2011.
  6. ^ "Assignment of Departments of State" (PDF). Iris Oifigiúil. 15 March 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 15 March 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  7. ^ "Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government | Wednesday, 9 March 2011". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  8. ^ The Department of Foreign Affairs was renamed the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade with effect from 2 June 2011. "S.I. No. 246/2011 - Foreign Affairs (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 24 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  9. ^ The Department of Public Expenditure and Reform was established by the Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act 2011 which was enacted on 19 July 2017. "Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act 2011". Irish Statute Book. 4 July 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  10. ^ The Department of Enterprise, Trade and Innovation was renamed the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation with effect from 2 June 2011. "S.I. No. 245/2011 - Enterprise, Trade and Innovation (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 24 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  11. ^ The Department of Tourism, Culture and Sport was renamed the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht with effect from 2 June 2011. "S.I. No. 220/2011 - Tourism, Culture and Sport (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  12. ^ The Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government was renamed the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government with effect from 2 May 2011. "S.I. No. 193/2011 - Transport (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 19 April 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  13. ^ The Department of Justice and Law Reform was renamed the Department of Justice and Equality with effect from 2 April 2011. "S.I. No. 138/2011 - Justice and Law Reform (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  14. ^ The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was renamed the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine with effect from 17 October 2011. "S.I. No. 455/2011 - Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 8 September 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  15. ^ The Department of Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs was renamed the Department of Children and Youth Affairs with effect from 2 June 2011. "S.I. No. 214/2011 - Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  16. ^ The Department of Health and Children was renamed the Department of Health with effect from 4 June 2011. "S.I. No. 219/2011 - Health (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  17. ^ The Department of Transport was renamed the Department of Transport with effect from 2 April 2011. "S.I. No. 141/2011 - Transport (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  18. ^ "Nomination of Member of Government: Motion | Thursday, 8 May 2014". Oireachtas. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  19. ^ "Nomination of Members of the Government: Motion | Friday, 11 July 2014". Oireachtas. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  20. ^ Nash is described as a "Super junior" minister, because unlike other Ministers of State, he attends cabinet meetings.
  21. ^ a b State's most senior civil servant to step down
  22. ^ "Economic Management Council". Department of the Taoiseach. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  23. ^ "Cabinet Committee Meetings". Dáil debates. Oireachtas. 24 September 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  24. ^ Laffan, Brigid (28 August 2013). "Economic Management Council acts as a 'war cabinet' in Ireland's fight for survival". The Irish Times. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  25. ^ "Martin queries constitutionality of Economic Management Council". RTÉ News. 30 July 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  26. ^ "Dáil Debates: Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government: Motion (Continued)". oireachtasdebates.oireachtas.ie. 6 May 2016. Retrieved 12 August 2019.