Government of the 31st Dáil

The Government of the 31st Dáil or the 29th Government of Ireland (9 March 2011 – 6 May 2016) was the government of Ireland which was formed following the 2011 general election to Dáil Éireann on 25 February 2011. It was a coalition government of Fine Gael and the Labour Party led by Enda Kenny as Taoiseach. From 2011 to 2014, Labour Party leader Eamon Gilmore served as Tánaiste, and from 2014 to 2016, the new Labour leader Joan Burton served as Tánaiste.

Government of the 31st Dáil
29th Government of Ireland
Enda Kenny EPP 2014 (cropped).jpg
Date formed9 March 2011
Date dissolved6 May 2016
People and organisations
PresidentMary McAleese (2011)
Michael D. Higgins (2011–16)
TaoiseachEnda Kenny
TánaisteEamon Gilmore (2011–14)
Joan Burton (2014–16)
No. of ministers15
Member partiesFine Gael
Labour Party
Status in legislatureMajority Coalition
Opposition cabinetFirst Martin front bench
Opposition partyFianna Fáil
Opposition leaderMicheál Martin
History
Election(s)2011 general election
Legislature term(s)31st Dáil
24th Seanad
Budget(s)2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Outgoing formation2016 government formation
Predecessor28th Government
Successor30th Government

The 29th Government lasted 1828 days from its appointment until its resignation, and continued to carry out its duties for a further 60 days until the appointment of the successor government.

29th Government of IrelandEdit

 
Members of the Government of the 31st Dáil

Nomination of TaoiseachEdit

The members of the 31st Dáil first met on 9 March 2011. In the debate on the nomination of Taoisech, only Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny was proposed.[1] This proposal was carried with 117 votes in favour and 27 votes against, the greatest number of votes cast in the Dáil in favour of the nomination of a candidate for Taoiseach. Kenny was then appointed as Taoiseach by president Mary McAleese.[2]

9 March 2011
Nomination of Taoiseach vote for Enda Kenny (FG)
[3]
Motion proposed by Simon Harris and seconded by Ciara Conway
Absolute majority: 84/166
Vote Parties Votes
 Y Yes Fine Gael (76), Labour Party (37), Independent (5)
117 / 166
No Sinn Féin (14), Independent (8), People Before Profit Alliance (2), Socialist Party (2), Workers and Unemployed Action Group (1)
27 / 166
Not voting Fianna Fáil (20), Ceann Comhairle (1), Independent (1)
22 / 166

Members of the GovernmentEdit

After his appointment by the president, Enda Kenny proposed the members of the government and they were approved by the Dáil.[2][4][5]

Office Name Term Party
Taoiseach Enda Kenny 2011–2016 Fine Gael
Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore 2011–2014 Labour Party
Minister for Foreign Affairs (Ireland)[a]
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan 2011–2016 Fine Gael
Minister for Education and Skills Ruairi Quinn 2011–2014 Labour Party
Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform[b] Brendan Howlin 2011–2016
Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation[c] Richard Bruton Fine Gael
Minister for Social Protection Joan Burton Labour Party
Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht[d] Jimmy Deenihan 2011–2014 Fine Gael
Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte Labour Party
Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government[e] Phil Hogan Fine Gael
Minister for Justice and Equality[f] Alan Shatter 2011–2014
Minister for Defence
Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine[g] Simon Coveney 2011–2016
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs[h] Frances Fitzgerald 2011–2014
Minister for Health[i] James Reilly
Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport[j] Leo Varadkar

Changes 8 May 2014Edit

Following the resignation of Alan Shatter.[16][17]

Minister for Justice and Equality Frances Fitzgerald 2014–2016 Fine Gael
Minister for Defence Enda Kenny (acting) 2014
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Charles Flanagan 2014

Changes 11 July 2014Edit

A cabinet reshuffle took place following the election of Joan Burton as leader of the Labour Party
and the nomination of Phil Hogan as European Commissioner.[18][19]

Tánaiste Joan Burton 2014–2016 Labour Party
Minister for Defence Simon Coveney Fine Gael
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs James Reilly Fine Gael
Minister for Health Leo Varadkar Fine Gael
Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade Charles Flanagan Fine Gael
Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Alex White Labour Party
Minister for Education and Skills Jan O'Sullivan Labour Party
Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government Alan Kelly Labour Party
Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Paschal Donohoe Fine Gael
Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Heather Humphreys Fine Gael
Changes to departments
  1. ^ The Department of Foreign Affairs was renamed the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade on 2 June 2011.[6]
  2. ^ The Department of Public Expenditure and Reform was established by the Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act 2011 which was enacted on 4 July 2011.[7]
  3. ^ The Department of Enterprise, Trade and Innovation was renamed the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation on 2 June 2011.[8]
  4. ^ The Department of Tourism, Culture and Sport was renamed the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht on 2 June 2011.[9]
  5. ^ The Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government was renamed the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government on 2 May 2011.[10]
  6. ^ The Department of Justice and Law Reform was renamed the Department of Justice and Equality on 2 April 2011.[11]
  7. ^ The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was renamed the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine on 17 October 2011.[12]
  8. ^ The Department of Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs was renamed the Department of Children and Youth Affairs on 2 June 2011.[13]
  9. ^ The Department of Health and Children was renamed the Department of Health on 4 June 2011.[14]
  10. ^ The Department of Transport was renamed the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport on 2 April 2011.[15]

Attorney GeneralEdit

Máire Whelan SC was appointed as Attorney General by the president on the nomination of the Taoiseach.[2][4]

Ministers of StateEdit

On 9 March 2011, Paul Kehoe and Willie Penrose were appointed by the government on the nomination of the Taoiseach as Ministers of State who would attend cabinet without a vote.[2] On 10 March 2011, the government on the nomination of the Taoiseach appointed 13 further Ministers of State.[20][21]

Name Department(s) Responsibility Term Party
Paul Kehoe
(In attendance at cabinet)
Taoiseach
Defence
Government Chief Whip
Defence
2011–2016 Fine Gael
Willie Penrose
(In attendance at cabinet)
Environment, Community and Local Government Housing and Planning 2011 Labour Party
Dinny McGinley Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Gaeltacht Affairs 2011–2014 Fine Gael
Róisín Shortall Health Primary Care 2011–2012 Labour Party
John Perry Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Small Business 2011–2014 Fine Gael
Michael Ring Transport, Tourism and Sport Tourism and Sport 2011–2016 Fine Gael
Jan O'Sullivan Foreign Affairs and Trade Trade and Development 2011 Labour Party
Kathleen Lynch Justice and Equality
Health
Disability, Equality
and Mental Health
2011–2014 Labour Party
Fergus O'Dowd Environment, Community and Local Government
Communications, Energy and Natural Resources
NewERA Project[22] 2011–2014 Fine Gael
Brian Hayes Public Expenditure and Reform
Finance
Public Service Reform
and the Office of Public Works
2011–2014 Fine Gael
Shane McEntee Agriculture, Food and the Marine Food, Horticulture
and Food Safety
2011–2012 Fine Gael
Lucinda Creighton Taoiseach
Foreign Affairs and Trade
European Affairs 2011–2013 Fine Gael
Seán Sherlock Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation
Education and Skills
Research and Innovation 2011–2014 Labour Party
Ciarán Cannon Education and Skills Training and Skills 2011–2014 Fine Gael
Alan Kelly Transport, Tourism and Sport Public and Commuter Transport 2011–2014 Labour Party

Change on 20 December 2011Edit

Following the resignation of Willie Penrose on 15 November 2011.

Jan O'Sullivan
(In attendance at cabinet)
Environment, Community and Local Government Housing and Planning 2011–2014 Labour Party
Joe Costello Foreign Affairs and Trade Trade and Development 2011–2014 Labour Party

Change on 2 October 2012Edit

Following the resignation of Róisín Shortall on 26 September 2012.[23][24]

Alex White Health Primary Care 2012–2014 Labour Party

Change on 5 June 2013Edit

Following the death of Shane McEntee on 21 December 2012.[25]

Tom Hayes Agriculture, Food and the Marine Food, Horticulture
and Food Safety
2013–2016 Fine Gael

Change on 12 July 2013Edit

Following the resignation of Lucinda Creighton on 11 July 2013.[26]

Paschal Donohoe Taoiseach
Foreign Affairs and Trade
European Affairs 2013–2014 Fine Gael

Change on 15 July 2014Edit

Following the cabinet reshuffle in July 2014.[19][27]

Ged Nash
(In attendance at cabinet)
Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Business and Employment 2014–2016 Labour Party
Jimmy Deenihan Taoiseach
Foreign Affairs and Trade
Diaspora 2014–2016 Fine Gael
Kathleen Lynch Health Primary Care, Mental Health
and Disability
2014–2016 Labour Party
Seán Sherlock Foreign Affairs and Trade Overseas Development Assistance,
Trade Promotion and
North/South Cooperation
2014–2016 Labour Party
Damien English Education and Skills
Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation
Skills, Research and Innovation 2014–2016 Fine Gael
Joe McHugh Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht
Communications, Energy and Natural Resources
Gaeltacht Affairs
and Natural Resources
2014–2016 Fine Gael
Paudie Coffey Environment, Community and Local Government Housing, Planning
and Construction 2020 Strategy
2014–2016 Fine Gael
Simon Harris Finance
Public Expenditure and Reform
Taoiseach
Office of Public Works,
Public Procurement
and International Banking
2014–2016 Fine Gael
Kevin Humphreys Social Protection Employment, Community
and Social Support
2014–2016 Labour Party
Dara Murphy Taoiseach
Foreign Affairs and Trade
European Affairs
and Data Protection
2014–2016 Fine Gael
Aodhán Ó Ríordáin Justice and Equality
Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht
New Communities, Culture
and Equality
2014–2016 Labour Party
Ann Phelan Agriculture, Food and the Marine
Transport, Tourism and Sport
Rural Economic Development
and Rural Transport
2014–2016 Labour Party

Economic Management CouncilEdit

The Economic Management Council was a cabinet subcommittee of senior ministers formed to co-ordinate the response to the Irish financial crisis and the government's dealings with the troika of the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund.[28] Its members were the Taoiseach, the Tánaiste, the Minister for Finance, and the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform.[29] It was supported by the Department of the Taoiseach, led by Dermot McCarthy.[28][30] Brigid Laffan compared it to a war cabinet.[31] Opposition parties suggested the Council represented a dangerous concentration of power.[32]

Following the formation of a government in 2016, Shane Ross, a member of the Government of the 32nd Dáil, confirmed in the Dáil that the subcommittee would not form part of the new government. Ross told the Dáil on 6 May 2016: "I had a conversation last night with the Taoiseach. I was talking to him about Dáil reform and I asked him about an issue - a last point I had forgotten to ask about earlier - which was the abolition of the Economic Management Council. I thought it was going to be like one of these thorny topics which we had been through over the last few weeks. He told me okay, it is gone, that it had been needed for a particular time and it is not needed any more and I was to consider it gone. To me that was very encouraging because it meant that one of those obstacles to Dáil reform, one of those rather secretive bodies that had dictated to the Cabinet and to the Dáil the agenda of what came out to the country, was now a thing of the past."[33]

Dissolution and resignationEdit

On 3 February 2016, Taoiseach Enda Kenny sought a dissolution of the Dáil which was granted by the president, with the new Dáil to convene on 10 March.[34] The general election took place on 26 February.

The members of the 32nd Dáil first met on 10 March. Enda Kenny, Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin, Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams, and Richard Boyd Barrett of the Anti-Austerity Alliance–People Before Profit were each proposed for nomination as Taoiseach. None of the four motions were successful.[35] Kenny announced that he would resign as Taoiseach but that under the provisions of Article 28.11 of the Constitution, the government would continue to carry out their duties until their successors were appointed.[36] Kenny continued in this capacity until 6 May 2016, when he was again nominated for the appointment by the president to the position of Taoiseach and formed the 30th Government of Ireland.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Nomination of Taoiseach – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Wednesday, 9 March 2011". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d "Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government – Dáil Éireann (32nd Dáil) - Wednesday, 9 March 2011". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  3. ^ "Nomination of Taoiseach – Votes – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) - Wednesday, 9 March 2011". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  4. ^ a b "Appointment of Ministers and Ministers of State – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Tuesday, 15 March 2011". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Enda Kenny reveals new Cabinet". RTÉ News. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 10 March 2011.
  6. ^ "Foreign Affairs (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 24 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  7. ^ "Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act 2011". Irish Statute Book. 4 July 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  8. ^ "Enterprise, Trade and Innovation (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 24 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  9. ^ "Tourism, Culture and Sport (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  10. ^ "Environment, Heritage and Local Government (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 19 April 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  11. ^ "Justice and Law Reform (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  12. ^ "Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 8 September 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  13. ^ "Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  14. ^ "Health (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  15. ^ "Transport (Alteration of Name of Department and Title of Minister) Order 2011". Irish Statute Book. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  16. ^ "Nomination of Member of Government: Motion – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Thursday, 8 May 2014". Oireachtas. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  17. ^ "Appointment of Ministers – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Tuesday, 13 May 2014". Oireachtas. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  18. ^ "Nomination of Members of the Government: Motion – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Friday, 11 July 2014". Oireachtas. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  19. ^ a b "Appointment of Ministers of State – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Tuesday, 15 July 2014". Oireachtas. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  20. ^ "Government appoints Ministers of State". MerrionStreet.ie. 10 March 2011.
  21. ^ "Appointment of Ministers and Ministers of State – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Tuesday, 15 March 2011". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  22. ^ Government economic stimulus plan
  23. ^ "Resignation of Minister of State: Statement – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Thursday, 27 September 2012". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  24. ^ "Ministerial Appointment: Announcement by Taoiseach – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Tuesday, 2 October 2012". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  25. ^ "Appointment of Minister of State – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Tuesday, 11 June 2013". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  26. ^ "Appointment of Minister of State: Announcement by Taoiseach – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Tuesday, 16 July 2013". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  27. ^ "New Ministers of State Appointed". MerrionStreet.ie. 15 July 2014. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  28. ^ a b State's most senior civil servant to step down
  29. ^ "Economic Management Council". Department of the Taoiseach. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  30. ^ "Cabinet Committee Meetings". Dáil debates. Oireachtas. 24 September 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  31. ^ Laffan, Brigid (28 August 2013). "Economic Management Council acts as a 'war cabinet' in Ireland's fight for survival". The Irish Times. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  32. ^ "Martin queries constitutionality of Economic Management Council". RTÉ News. 30 July 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  33. ^ "Appointment of Taoiseach and Nomination of Members of Government: Motion (Continued) – Dáil Éireann (32nd Dáil) – Friday, 6 May 2016". Oireachtas. 6 May 2016. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  34. ^ "Advice to Dissolve Dáil: Announcement – Dáil Éireann (31st Dáil) – Wednesday, 3 February 2016". Oireachtas. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  35. ^ "Nomination of Taoiseach – Dáil Éireann (32nd Dáil) – Thursday, 10 March 2016". Houses of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  36. ^ Constitution of Ireland, Article 28.11