CP football

  (Redirected from Football 7-a-side)

Cerebral palsy football, also called 7-a-side football or Paralympic football, is an adaptation of association football for athletes with cerebral palsy and other neurological disorders, including stroke and traumatic brain injury. From 1978 to 2014, cerebral palsy football was governed by the Cerebral Palsy International Sports and Recreation Association (CPISRA). In January 2015, governance of the sport was taken over by the International Federation of Cerebral Palsy Football.

The sport is played with modified FIFA rules. Among the modifications are a reduced field of play, a reduction in the number of players, elimination of the offside rule, and permission for one-handed throw-ins. Matches consist of two thirty-minute halves, with a fifteen-minute half-time break. Teams must field at least one class C5 or C6 player at all times. No more than one players of class C8 are permitted to play at the same time.

International competition in 7-a-side football began at the 1978 CP-ISRA International Games in Edinburgh, Scotland. The sport was added to the Summer Paralympic Games at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in New York City, U.S., and has been played at every Summer Games since.

GovernanceEdit

From 1978 to 2014, cerebral palsy football was governed by the Cerebral Palsy International Sports and Recreation Association (CPISRA). In January 2015, governance of the sport was taken over by the International Federation of Cerebral Palsy Football.[1]

Different organizations govern the sport on a national level. In Australia, the sport is governed by Football Federation Australia, with the sport also having state governing bodies in the country. For New South Wales, this is Cerebral Palsy Sporting and Recreation Association NSW. In Queensland, it is Football Queensland. The sport is overseen by Football Federation South Australia in South Australia. In Victoria, it is run by Disability Sport and Recreation. In Western Australia, the sport is governed by Football West. In the Australian Capital Territory, the sport is governed by Capital Football. In Tasmania, the sport is run by Disability Sport and Recreation.[2]

Rule modificationsEdit

While CP football generally follows many of the rules of association football, the sport includes a few modifications.[3][4] These rules include a lack of an offside rule, and players being allowed to throw in the ball using only one hand.[4][3][2] Throw-ins can be done using an underhand technique.[5]

The game is also shorter, featuring two 30-minute halves with a 15-minute halftime break.[4][3][2][6] It also includes only 7 players on the field for each team during play.[3][2] The goal and the field are also smaller than the non-disability association football game.[3][2][6] The field is 75 meters by 55 meters.[5]

In tournament competition, playoff and finals games that end in a draw following regulation time have extra time added. This extra time consists of two 10-minute periods, where the first goal scored wins the game. If there is still a draw following those 20 minutes of play, a penalty shoot out takes place. 5 players from each time attempt to score from the place where penalty kicks take place. The team with the most goals following 5 shots each wins.[4]

ClassificationEdit

Four classes participate in the sport.[4] These classes are FT5, FT6, FT7 and FT8.[3][2][6] The type of disability for each class is:

  • FT5: Athletes with difficulties when walking and running, but not in standing or when kicking the ball.[2][6]
  • FT6: Athletes with control and co-ordination problems of their upper limbs, especially when running.[2][6]
  • FT7: Athletes with hemiplegia.[2][6]
  • FT8: Minimally disabled athletes; they must meet eligibility criteria and have an obvious impairment that has impact on the sport of football.[2][3][6]

Originally, classification for the sport was only open to people with cerebral palsy, but the classification system as later changed. This opened up the sport to people with brain injuries and other motor function disorders with functional participation similar to that of people with cerebral palsy.[2][5][6]

Teams must field at least one class C5 or C6 player at all times. No more than one players of class C8 are permitted to play at the same time.[5]

SpreadingEdit

The following nations have a football national team:[7]

Africa
Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tunisia
America
Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Canada, Colombia, Mexico, USA, Venezuela
Asia
Australia, China, India, Iran, Japan, Jordan, Korea, Macao, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand and the United Arab Emirates
Europe
Belgium, Denmark, Germany, England, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Northern Ireland, Portugal, Austria, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine and Wales

CompetitionEdit

The sport has several major competitions. These include the Parapan American Games, Asian Para Games and the IFCPF CP Football World Championships, former the CPISRA Football-7-a-Side World Championships.[4] The first CPISRA World Championships took place in Denmark in 1982, four years after the first international competition for the sport took place in Scotland at the Cerebral Palsy International Games.[6]

7-a-side football was also played at the Paralympic Games, making its debut at the 1984 Summer Paralympics.[3][2][5][6][8] It was dropped from the Paralympic program for the 2020 Summer Paralympics.[3]

ResultsEdit

World-wide tournamentsEdit

Summer-Paralympics

Year Host Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place Number of teams Ref.
1984
Details
 
New York
 
Belgium
1–0  
Ireland
 
Great Britain
3–1  
Portugal
6 [9]
1988
Details
 
Seoul
 
Netherlands
1  
Belgium
 
Ireland
1  
South Korea
5 [9][10]
1992
Details
 
Barcelona
 
Netherlands
3–2  
Portugal
 
Ireland
2–1 (a.e.t.)  
Great Britain
8 [9][10]
1996
Details
 
Atlanta
 
Netherlands
1–0  
Russia
 
Spain
2–1  
Great Britain
8 [9][10]
2000
Details
 
Sydney
 
Russia
3–2  
Ukraine
 
Brazil
2–1  
Portugal
8 [9]
2004
Details
 
Athens
 
Ukraine
4–1  
Brazil
 
Russia
5–0  
Argentina
8 [9]
2008
Details
 
Beijing
 
Ukraine
2–1 (a.e.t.)  
Russia
 
Iran
4–0  
Brazil
8 [9]
2012
Details
 
London
 
Russia
1–0  
Ukraine
 
Iran
5–0  
Brazil
8 [9]
2016
Details
 
Rio de Janeiro
 
Ukraine
2–1 (a.e.t.)  
Iran
 
Brazil
3–1  
Netherlands
8 [9]
1 = The tournament was played in a group mode.
  • a.e.t.: after extra time
  • p: after penalty shoot-out

World CP Football ChampionshipsEdit

World Championships and International Cups

Year Host Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place Number of teams Ref.
1982
Details
 
Greve (CPG)
 
Ireland
2–0  
Netherlands
 
Belgium
no information available2 8 [9][10]
1986
Details
 
Gits (CPG)
 
Netherlands
3–0  
Belgium
 
Ireland
3  
Portugal
6 [9][10]
1990
Details
 
Assen (WC)
 
Netherlands
5–0  
Ireland
 
Belgium
no information available2 5 [9][10]
1994
Details
 
Dublin (WC)
 
Netherlands
2–0  
Ireland
 
Belgium
3  
Spain
[9][10]
1997
Details
 
Delden (CPG)
 
Russia
1998
Details
 
Rio de Janeiro (WC)
 
Russia
3–1  
Ukraine
 
Brazil
3–2  
Spain
11 [9]
2001
Details
 
Nottingham (CPG)
 
Ukraine
3–1  
Russia
 
Brazil
2–0  
Iran
13 [11]
2003
Details
 
Buenos Aires (WC)
 
Ukraine
3–1  
Brazil
 
Russia
2–1  
Argentina
[9]
2005
Details
 
New London (CPG)
 
Ukraine
no score found  
Russia
 
Iran
9–0  
Netherlands
13 [10]
2007
Details
 
Rio de Janeiro (WC)
 
Russia
2–1  
Iran
 
Ukraine
2–0  
Brazil
16 [9][12]
2009
Details
 
Arnhem (IC)
 
Ukraine
0–0 (a.e.t.)
(9–8 p.)
 
Russia
 
Iran
1–0  
Brazil
12 [13]
2011
Details
 
Assen, Emmen, Hoogeveen (WC)
 
Russia
6–1  
Iran
 
Ukraine
8–3  
Brazil
16 [9][14]
2013
Details
 
Sant Cugat del Vallès (Cup)
 
Ukraine
1–0  
Brazil
 
Russia
4–0  
Ireland
16 [15]
IFCPF tournaments
2015
Details
 
Burton-upon-Trent (WC)
 
Russia
1–0  
Ukraine
 
Brazil
6–0  
Netherlands
16 [9][16]
2017
Details
 
San Luis (WC)
 
Ukraine
1–0  
Iran
 
Russia
2–0   England 16 [17]
2019
Details
 
Pinto, Madrid (Cup)
 
Russia
2020
Details
not forgiven (Top8) Future events Future events 8
2021
Details
not forgiven (WC) Future events Future events
2023
Details
not forgiven (Cup) Future events Future events
2024
Details
not forgiven (Top8) Future events Future events 8
2025
Details
not forgiven (WC) Future events Future events
2 = There is no information on the homepage of the IFCPF
3 = no score found
  • a.e.t.: after extra time
  • p: after penalty shoot-out

Regional tournamentEdit

African Championships

To date, there have been no international championships in Africa since there are too few teams.

Pan American Championships

Year Host Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place Number of teams Ref.
1995
Details
 
unknown (PSC)
 
United States
AM1  
Argentina
 
Brazil
AM1  
Chile
4
1999
Details

unknown (PSC)
 
Argentina
AM1  
United States
 
Brazil
AM1  
Chile
4
2002
Details
 
Santiago (PSC)
 
Brazil
3–1  
Argentina
 / 
Chile United States
AM2  / 
Chile United States
4 [18]
2003
 
 
Mar del Plata (PG)
no football 7-a-side tournament at the Parapan American Games [19]
2006
 
 
Rio de Janeiro (AC)
In 2006 a CPISRA America Cup was planned in Rio de Janeiro. But this was not done since 2007 the Parapan America Games and the CPISRA World Championship is carried out.
2007
Details
 
Rio de Janeiro (PG)
 
Brazil
5–0  
Argentina
 
Canada
1–0  
United States
6 [20][21]
2010
Details
 
Buenos Aires (AC)
 
Brazil
AM1  
United States
 
Argentina
AM1  
Canada
6 [22][23]
2011
 
 
Guadalajara (PG)
no football 7-a-side tournament at the Parapan American Games [24]
2014
Details
 
Toronto (AC)
 
Brazil
3–0  
Argentina
 
United States
3–0  
Canada
6 [25]
IFCPF tournaments
2015
Details
 
Toronto (PG)
 
Brazil
3–1  
Argentina
 
Venezuela
2–1  
Canada
5 [26]
2018
Details
 
Sangolquí (AC)
 
Brazil
4–2  
Argentina
 
United States
3–0  
Colombia
8 [27]
2019
Details
 
Lima (PG)
Future events Future events
2022
Details
not forgiven (AC) Future events Future events
2023
Details
not forgiven (PG) Future events Future events
2026
Details
not forgiven (AC) Future events Future events
2027
Details
not forgiven (PG) Future events Future events
AM1 = The tournament was played in a group mode.
AM2 = no score found
  • a.e.t.: after extra time
  • p: after penalty shoot-out

Asian Championships

Year Host Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place Number of teams Ref.
2002
Details
 
Busan (FG)
 
South Korea
Round Robin  
Malaysia
 
Japan
3 [28][29]
2006
Details
 
Kuala Lumpur (FG)
 
Iran
5–0  
Australia
 
China
4–0  
Japan
6 [30]
2010
Details
 
Guangzhou (AsianG)
 
Iran
7–0  
China
 
Japan
2–0  
South Korea
4 [31]
2014
Details
 
Incheon (AsianG)
 
Iran
5–0  
Japan
 
South Korea
3–0  
Singapore
4 [32]
IFCPF tournaments
2018
Details
 
Kish Island (AOC)
 
Iran
AS1  
Australia
 
Jordan
AS1  
Thailand
5 [33]
2022
Details
not forgiven (AOC) Future events Future events
2026
Details
not forgiven (AOC) Future events Future events
2030
Details
not forgiven (AOC) Future events Future events
AS1 = The tournament was played in a group mode.
  • a.e.t.: after extra time
  • p: after penalty shoot-out

Oceanian Championships

To date there have been no international championships in Oceania as there are too few teams. There are only two members of the IFCPF in Oceania: Australia and New Zealand. Australia has participated in the European World Cup 2010 except for competition.

European Championships

Year Host Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place Number of teams Ref.
1991
Details
 
Nottingham (ESC)
 
Netherlands
3–0  
UK
  /  
Ireland France
EU1   /  
Ireland France
4 [10]
1995
Details
 
Nottingham (ESC)
 
Netherlands
0–0(a.e.t.)
(– p.)
 
Russia
 
UK
UK
EU1  
UK
UK
[10]
1999
Details
 
Brasschaat (ESC)
 
Ukraine
4–2  
Netherlands
no information available [10]
2002
Details
 
Kiev (ESC)
 
Ukraine
6–1  
Russia
 
Netherlands
1–0  
Portugal
7 [10][18]
2006
Details
 
Dublin (EC)
 
Ukraine
5–2  
Russia
 
Netherlands
2–1  
Ireland
8 [10][34]
2010
Details
 
Glasgow (EC)
 
Ukraine
1–1 (a.e.t.) (9–8p)  
Russia
 
Ireland
2–0  
Netherlands
10 [10][35]
2014
Details
 
Maia (EC)
 
Ukraine
3–0  
Netherlands
 
Russia
3–0  
Ireland
11 [10][36]
IFCPF tournaments
2018
Details
 
Zeist (EC)
 
Russia
3–2  
Ukraine
 
Ireland
2–1  
Netherlands
12 [10][37]
2022
Details
not forgiven (EC) Future events Future events
2026
Details
not forgiven (EC) Future events Future events
2030
Details
not forgiven (EC) Future events Future events
EU1 = no score found
  • a.e.t.: after extra time
  • p: after penalty shoot-out

Southeast Asian Championships

Year Host Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place Number of teams Ref.
2014
Details
 
Naypyidaw (ASEANG)
 
Myanmar
ASE1  
Singapore
 
Thailand
ASE1  
Malaysia
4 [38]
IFCPF tournaments
2015
Details
 
Singapore (ASEANG)
 
Thailand
3–0  
Myanmar
 
Singapore
2–1  
Malaysia
5 [39]
2017
Details
 
Kuala Lumpur (ASEANG)
 
Indonesia
3–0  
Thailand
 
Malaysia
4–0  
Singapore
6 [40]
2019
Details
 
Manila (ASEANG)
Future events Future events
2021
Details
 
Hanoi (ASEANG)
Future events Future events
2023
Details
 
Phnom Penh (ASEANG)
Future events Future events
2025
Details
 
TBA (ASEANG)
Future events Future events
2027
Details
not forgiven (ASEANG) Future events Future events
ASE1 = The tournament was played in a group mode.
  • a.e.t.: after extra time
  • p: after penalty shoot-out

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit