Ethel Barrymore Theatre

The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is a Broadway theater at 241 West 47th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1928, it was designed by Herbert J. Krapp in the Elizabethan, Mediterranean, and Adam styles for the Shubert family. The theater, named in honor of actress Ethel Barrymore, has 1,058 seats and is operated by the Shubert Organization. Both the facade and the auditorium interior are New York City landmarks.

Ethel Barrymore Theatre
Barrymore Theatre (52302264853).jpg
Address243 West 47th Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′36″N 73°59′10″W / 40.76000°N 73.98611°W / 40.76000; -73.98611Coordinates: 40°45′36″N 73°59′10″W / 40.76000°N 73.98611°W / 40.76000; -73.98611
OwnerThe Shubert Organization
DesignationBroadway
Capacity1,058
ProductionThe Piano Lesson
Construction
OpenedDecember 20, 1928
Years active1928–present
ArchitectHerbert J. Krapp
Website
Official website
DesignatedNovember 4, 1987[1]
Reference no.1313[1]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedNovember 10, 1987[2]
Reference no.1314[2]
Designated entityAuditorium interior

The ground-floor facade is made of rusticated blocks of terracotta. The theater's main entrance consists of two archways and a doorway shielded by a marquee. The upper stories contain an arched screen made of terracotta, inspired by Roman baths, which is surrounded by white brick. The auditorium contains ornamental plasterwork, a sloped orchestra level, a large balcony, and a coved ceiling with a 36 ft-wide (11 m) dome. The balcony level contains box seats topped by decorative arches. The theater was also designed with a basement lounge and a now-demolished stage house.

The Shubert brothers developed the Barrymore Theatre after Ethel Barrymore agreed to have the brothers manage her theatrical career. It opened on December 20, 1928, with The Kingdom of God, and was the last pre-Depression house developed by the Shuberts. Ethel Barrymore only worked with the Shuberts until 1932 and last performed in the theater in 1940. The Barrymore has consistently remained in use as a legitimate theater since its opening, hosting plays and musicals; it is one of the few Broadway theaters to have never been sold or renamed. The theater was refurbished in the 1980s and the 2000s.

SiteEdit

The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is on 243 West 47th Street, on the north sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Broadway, near Times Square in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[3][4] The square land lot covers 10,050 sq ft (934 m2), with a frontage of 100 ft (30 m) on 47th Street and a depth of 100 feet.[4][5][6] The Barrymore shares the block with the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre to the west, the Longacre Theatre to the north, and the Morgan Stanley Building to the east. Other nearby buildings include the Eugene O'Neill Theatre and Walter Kerr Theatre to the north; Crowne Plaza Times Square Manhattan to the northeast; 20 Times Square to the east; the Hotel Edison and Lunt-Fontanne Theatre to the south; and the Lena Horne Theatre and Paramount Hotel to the southwest.[4]

DesignEdit

The Ethel Barrymore Theatre was designed by Herbert J. Krapp in several styles and was constructed in 1928 for the Shubert brothers.[3][7][8] The theater is named after actress Ethel Barrymore (1879–1959), a prominent member of the Barrymore family of actors,[9] and is operated by the Shubert Organization.[10][11][12] The Barrymore has been used continuously as a legitimate house and, unlike most Broadway theaters, has never been sold or renamed since its opening.[13] The Barrymore was the last theater to be built by the Shubert Organization until 2003.[14]

FacadeEdit

Detail of central entrance
One of the arched entrances
Detail of wreath

The facade is symmetrically arranged. The ground floor is clad in rusticated blocks of terracotta, painted in a limestone color, above a granite water table. At ground level, the auditorium entrance includes two arched openings, each with four aluminum and glass doors. The voussoirs of the arches are made of rusticated blocks, while the keystones at the centers of each arch are shaped like brackets. Within each arch, the spaces above the doors are infilled with black glazed tiles; originally, these spaces were filled with metal tracery. Between the arched doors is a smaller doorway, which is topped by a large keystone. Above all of these openings is a marquee with the name "Barrymore", which is supported by ornate bronze brackets.[15] The presence of the large marquee obscures the contrast between the ground floor and upper stories.[16] The brackets originally supported a smaller bronze-and-glass canopy, which curved upward in front of either arch.[5][17]

On either side of the doors are terracotta niches with bronze-framed sign boards. Above the signboards are terracotta wreaths, which surround circular panels with the gilded letters "The Barrymore Theater". Each wreath is topped by a curved pediment. The western and eastern portions of the facade are recessed slightly and contain recessed openings.[15] The opening to the east is marked as the stage door.[10][15] A frieze, decorated with leaf and wave moldings, runs above the first floor.[15] To the east, there was originally a stage house with fire escapes on its facade, but this has since been replaced with the Morgan Stanley Building.[17]

 
Upper-story detail

The upper stories are faced in bonded glazed-white brick.[15][17][18] The central part of the facade includes a terracotta screen with an Ancient Roman-inspired pattern, surrounded by a cord molding. The screen includes a grid of squares, each of which contain central medallions with bars radiating in eight directions. To the left of the screen, the wall contains a sign with the name "Barrymore" and a metal fire escape. A metal sign hangs from the facade to the right. The top of the screen curves upward in a manner resembling a proscenium arch, and a brick parapet rises above the screen. A Greek key frieze and a cornice with talon moldings runs above the entire facade.[15] Contemporary media from the theater's opening cited the top of the facade as being 62 ft (19 m) above the sidewalk, while the screen was 52 ft (16 m) wide.[6][18]

AuditoriumEdit

The auditorium has an orchestra level, one balcony, boxes and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The space is designed with plaster decorations in low relief.[19] The auditorium is shaped almost as a square.[20] According to the Shubert Organization, the auditorium has 1,058 seats;[12] meanwhile, Playbill cites 1,039 seats[10] and The Broadway League cites 1,096 seats.[11] The physical seats are divided into 582 seats in the orchestra, 196 at the front of the balcony, 256 at the rear of the balcony, and 24 in the boxes.[12] There were originally 1,100 seats, divided into 570 in the orchestra, 494 in the balcony, and 36 in the boxes.[20][21]

The seats were designed to be "unusually comfortable",[20] with steel backs and bottoms. A source from the theater's opening cited the auditorium as having an old-gold and brown color scheme.[21] The interior uses a combination of Elizabethan, Mediterranean, and Adam-style design motifs.[17]

Seating areasEdit

The rear of the orchestra contains a promenade.[22] The rear wall of the promenade contains three doorways, above which is a frieze.[23] The promenade ceiling is curved and contains Elizabethan strapwork patterns.[22] There is a wrought iron balustrade between the orchestra promenade and the last row of orchestra seating. Two staircases lead from either end of the promenade to the balcony level; they contain wrought-iron railings with shield and strapwork motifs.[21][24] The orchestra is raked, sloping down toward the stage.[15][21] The side walls of the orchestra contain a wainscoting that is divided into panels.[19] The walls were originally painted cinnamon and gold.[21] There are lighting sconces on the walls.[24]

The balcony level is cantilevered above the orchestra and is divided into front and rear sections by an aisle halfway across its depth.[22] The crossover aisle connects to segmentally arched exit doors on both of the side walls.[19] There are console brackets above the arched exit doors, which support terraces that project slightly from an opening on either wall.[25] The rest of the balcony's side walls are made of simple plaster and contain wall sconces. The front rail of the balcony contains high-relief strapwork patterns, which have been covered over with light boxes. The underside of the balcony has plasterwork panels with crystal light fixtures suspended from medallions.[23] The original lighting fixtures, consisting of inverted bowls of cut glass,[20][21] have since been replaced.[24] Air-conditioning vents are placed along some of the panels under the balcony, as well as at the balcony's rear. There is a technical booth behind the balcony's rear wall.[24]

On either side of the proscenium are three boxes, raised about 9 ft (2.7 m) from the orchestra floor,[5][6][21] which curve toward the side walls.[22] At orchestra level is a wainscoted wall interrupted by three segmental-arched openings, one beneath each box.[25] The undersides of the boxes contain moldings and crystal light fixtures similar to those on the balcony.[23] The box fronts are decorated with three Elizabethan-style plasterwork bands. From bottom to top, the bands depict shields with putti's faces; rosettes; and strapwork around shields.[25] Immediately behind the boxes are six gold-colored, fluted pilasters with Ionic capitals.[21][25] There are half-columns in front of the pilasters that flank the center box. Above the pilasters is an architrave with plaster strapwork reliefs, as well as a balustrade containing vase-shaped balusters. There is a lunette above the balustrade; it includes a square shield motif, which is connected by latticework bands to sphinxes on either side.[25] The lunette is surrounded by strapwork bands and several concentric semicircular arches.[17][21][25] The semicircular arches have design motifs such as shells, shields, anthemia, and half-columns.[25] The arches, combined with the lunette, constitute a sunburst pattern.[12][17] The boxes and semicircular arches are surrounded by a plaster frame.[25]

Other design featuresEdit

Next to the boxes is a three-centered proscenium arch.[22] The archway is surrounded by a wide band with strapwork motifs, with narrow bands of leaves on either side. The spandrels, above the corners of the proscenium arch, contain decorative motifs.[25] The proscenium measures 24 ft 10 in (7.57 m) high and 39 ft 3 in (11.96 m) wide. The depth of the auditorium to the proscenium is 28 ft 3 in (8.61 m), while the depth to the front of the stage is 31 ft 3 in (9.53 m).[12] According to sources from the theater's completion, the proscenium opening was 40 ft (12 m) wide, while the arch itself was 34 ft (10 m) high. As arranged, the stage itself measured 28 ft (8.5 m) deep by 81 ft (25 m) wide. The stage gridiron was placed 65 ft (20 m) above the stage.[5][6][21] There are traps throughout the entire stage, as well as a counterweight fly system.[21]

The ceiling rises 49 ft (15 m) from the floor of the orchestra.[5][6][21] The coved ceiling contains a dome at its center, measuring 36 ft (11 m) wide.[20][22] At the center of the dome is a grilled centerpiece,[21] which is surrounded by several Elizabethan-style circles, as well as four medallions placed at 90-degree angles.[24] A glass chandelier hangs from the center of the dome.[20][24] The rest of the dome is divided into wedge-shaped sections, which are arranged in a circular pattern around the centerpiece.[21][24] Outside of the dome, the coved ceiling contains latticework panels, surrounded by a strapwork pattern. Where the coved ceiling curves onto the side walls, there is a band with water-leaf motifs.[24] Originally, this band was colored in green, gold, and gray.[21]

Other interior spacesEdit

The theater was built with a general lounge in the basement, which measured 25 by 50 ft (7.6 by 15.2 m). Separate spaces in the lounge were provided for women and men, and there was also a telephone booth.[5][6] According to contemporary news articles, the basement lounge was decorated with an ivory-colored strapwork ceiling, modeled after English designs. The lounge had antique Elizabethan furniture, a mulberry-and-taupe carpet, and walls with an "old English texture in antique color".[21][20] When the theater opened, Gilbert Miller lent a bronze bust of Ethel Barrymore, which was designed by A. C. Laddy.[20] The basement also had a large dressing room for choruses.[5][6]

On the first floor, Ethel Barrymore had her own modern-style reception and dressing room.[5][6][21] The second floor had a chorus room and a smaller dressing room. The theater was built with three additional floors, each with four dressing rooms.[5][6]

HistoryEdit

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[26] During the 1900s and 1910s, many theaters in Midtown Manhattan were developed by the Shubert brothers, one of the major theatrical syndicates of the time.[27] The Shuberts originated from Syracuse, New York, and expanded downstate into New York City in the first decade of the 20th century.[28][29] The brothers controlled a quarter of all plays and three-quarters of theatrical ticket sales in the U.S. by 1925.[28][30] The Shuberts continued to build Broadway theaters in the 1920s,[31][32] with the construction of four theaters on 48th and 49th Streets,[31][a] as well as the Imperial Theatre on 45th Street.[34]

Development and early yearsEdit

 
Seen from the east

In 1927, playwright Zoe Akins told Ethel Barrymore about an offer from the Shubert brothers,[35] who proposed developing a Broadway theater and naming it in her honor if she agreed to be represented by the Shuberts.[36] Barrymore agreed,[36] and the Shuberts hired Krapp to design the theater, construction of which started in late April or early May 1928.[37] At the time, Barrymore was 48 years old[b] and a prominent theatrical personality;[38][16] she had been represented by the Frohman brothers for almost her entire career.[39] In September 1928, Lee Shubert announced that the theater would open the next month, with Barrymore starring in G. Martinez Sierra's play The Kingdom of God.[18] The theater's completion was delayed, prompting The Kingdom of God to go on a several-week tour.[39][40]

The Barrymore Theatre ultimately opened on December 20, 1928.[20][41][42] During the opening, which was attended by many New York City socialites, Ethel Barrymore received seven curtain calls before she was able to give a speech thanking the Shuberts.[20][43] The Barrymore Theatre received so many items of Barrymore memorabilia that, within a month of the theater's opening, the Shuberts considered creating a library to house these gifts.[44] Ethel Barrymore appeared at her eponymous theater again in 1929, when she co-starred with Louis Calhern in The Love Duel,[42][45] which ran for 88 performances.[46][47][48] The Barrymore's next several plays did not feature Ethel Barrymore.[49] These included a transfer of John Drinkwater's comedy Bird in Hand in September 1929,[50] as well as Death Takes a Holiday that December,[42][51] the latter of which had a comparatively long run of 181 performances.[46][52]

1930s and 1940sEdit

In 1930, the theater staged the comedy Topaze[46][53] and the romance His Majesty's Car.[46][54] Ethel Barrymore's next appearance at the Barrymore was in the short-lived blackface comedy Scarlet Sister Mary in November 1930,[42][55] which saw the Broadway debut of the actress's daughter, Ethel Barrymore Colt.[56] More successful was The Truth Game with Ivor Novello and Billie Burke, which opened that December[57] and had 105 performances.[46][58] In 1931, the Barrymore hosted Mélo with Edna Best and Basil Rathbone,[59][60][61] followed that November by Ethel Barrymore in The School for Scandal,[62][63][64] whose son John Drew Colt made his first Broadway appearance in that show.[62] The Barrymore's productions in 1932 included a 144-performance run of Whistling in the Dark,[65][66] as well as the short-lived comedy Here Today[65][67][68] and a transfer of There's Always Juliet.[65][69] The same year, Ethel Barrymore stopped performing under the Shuberts' management, prompting the brothers to remove her first name from the marquee.[70] At the end of 1932, Fred Astaire and Claire Luce starred in the musical Gay Divorce,[65][71][72] where Astaire performed without his sister Adele for the first time.[73]

 
Upper part of the facade

The theater's plays in 1933 included Design for Living with Alfred Lunt, Lynn Fontanne, and Noël Coward,[74][75][76] as well as the mystery Ten Minute Alibi and the drama Jezebel.[77] The Barrymore went into receivership the same year, and the receiver deeded the theater to the Barrymore Theater Corporation.[78][79] The Barrymore had seven flops in 1934.[77] Coward, Lunt, and Fontanne returned in January 1935 for the play Point Valaine,[80] which lasted for only 56 performances.[81][82] The Barrymore hosted a transfer of the play Distaff Side that March,[77] and Philip Merivale and Gladys Cooper staged revivals of Shakespeare's Macbeth and Othello that October.[81][83] The play Parnell opened in November 1935 and ran for 98 performances;[81][84] it was followed by a double bill of Irwin Shaw's Bury the Dead and Prelude in April 1936,[81][85] then Emlyn Williams's Night Must Fall that September.[86][87][88] Clare Boothe Luce's The Women opened with an all-female cast in December 1936[77][89] and was a hit, running for 657 performances.[90][91][92]

The Playwrights' Company next presented the musical Knickerbocker Holiday with Walter Huston in 1938.[74][93][94] The next year, the Barrymore hosted No Time for Comedy with Katharine Cornell, Laurence Olivier, and Margalo Gillmore for 185 performances,[95][96] and Key Largo with Paul Muni, Uta Hagen, and José Ferrer for 105 performances.[97][98] In 1940, Ethel Barrymore appeared in the short-lived play An International Incident,[97][99] her last appearance at her namesake theater.[100] The musical Pal Joey, featuring Gene Kelly and Vivienne Segal with a score by Rodgers and Hart, opened later that year[101][102] and ran for 270 performances before transferring to another theater.[97][103][104] The next hit was Best Foot Forward with Rosemary Lane in 1941,[105] which had 326 performances.[97][106][107] Walter Kerr and Leo Brady's Count Me In had a short run in 1942,[108][109] but Anton Chekhov's The Three Sisters with Katharine Cornell was more successful, with 123 performances.[108][110] Another success was the war drama Tomorrow the World in 1943,[111][112] which had 499 performances.[113]

Revivals predominated at the theater in the mid-1940s.[114] These included The Barretts of Wimpole Street[111][115][116] and Pygmalion in 1945,[117][118] as well as The Duchess of Malfi[111][119][120] and Cyrano de Bergerac in 1946.[121][122] In 1947, Gian Carlo Menotti presented a double bill of the musical plays The Telephone and The Medium at the theater,[121][123] which ran for 212 performances.[124][125] Later that year, the Barrymore presented Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire, originally featuring Marlon Brando, Kim Hunter, Karl Malden, and Jessica Tandy.[126][127] The play, one of several that Irene Mayer Selznick produced at the theater, ran for 855 performances over the next two years.[121][128]

1950s to 1970sEdit

 
Look Homeward, Angel being performed in 1958

Menotti hosted another show at the Barrymore in 1950: the opera The Consul with Patricia Neway and Marie Powers.[121][129][130] Later that year, the Barrymore hosted Bell, Book and Candle with husband-and-wife team Rex Harrison and Lilli Palmer,[131][132] which ran for 233 performances.[133][134] Another married couple starred in another hit in 1951: The Fourposter with Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn,[131][135] who stayed for 632 performances.[136][137] This was followed in 1953 by a transfer of Misalliance.[138][139][140] The same year, the Barrymore staged Tea and Sympathy with Deborah Kerr, Leif Erickson, and John Kerr,[131][141] which had 712 total performances.[138][142] Shows in 1955 included The Desperate Hours;[143][144][145] a personal appearance by Marcel Marceau;[138][146] and the drama The Chalk Garden.[143][147][148] Leonard Sillman's revue New Faces of 1956 ran for 220 performances,[138][149] featuring Maggie Smith in her Broadway debut, as well as female impersonator T. C. Jones.[150] Ketti Frings's adaptation of Look Homeward, Angel premiered in 1957[131][151] and ran 530 performances.[138][152]

A Raisin in the Sun opened in March 1959,[131][153] staying for seven months and running 530 total performances.[154][155] When Ethel Barrymore died in June of that year, the theater's lights were dimmed in its namesake's honor.[9][43] Another comedy, A Majority of One with Gertrude Berg and Cedric Hardwicke, moved to the Barrymore later that year[150] and ran through June 1960.[156][157] The Barrymore's productions of the early 1960s included Critic's Choice with Henry Fonda and Mildred Natwick in 1960;[154][158][159] The Complaisant Lover with Michael Redgrave, Richard Johnson, and Googie Withers in 1961;[160][161][162] and A Gift of Time with Fonda and Olivia de Havilland in 1962.[154][163] Later in the decade, the theater hosted The Amen Corner in 1965,[154][164][165] followed the next year by Wait Until Dark[166][167][168] and a limited engagement by Les Ballets Africains.[166][169][170] This was followed in 1967 by Peter Shaffer's twin production of Black Comedy and White Lies.[171][172] The Barrymore's last hit of the 1960s was a revival of The Front Page in 1969.[173][174][175]

The Barrymore hosted several hits in the 1970s, several of which won Tony Awards and other accolades.[176] In 1970, Conduct Unbecoming opened at the Barrymore, featuring Michael Barrington and Jeremy Clyde.[177][178][179] The next year, Alec McCowen appeared in The Philanthropist,[177][180][181] as well as Melvin Van Peebles's musical Ain't Supposed to Die a Natural Death.[177][182] The New Phoenix Repertory Company premiered at the Barrymore in late 1973, with three works:[177] The Visit,[183][184] Chemin de Fer,[185][186] and Holiday.[187][188] This was followed in 1974 by Noël Coward in Two Keys with Tandy, Cronyn, and Anne Baxter,[177][189] a double bill of Coward's plays A Song at Twilight and Come Into the Garden, Maud.[190] The Barrymore hosted the play Travesties with John Wood in 1975,[191][192][193] as well as American Buffalo with Robert Duvall[191][194][195] and I Love My Wife in 1977.[196][197][198] The Barrymore's last hit of the decade was the 1979 play Romantic Comedy, featuring Mia Farrow and Anthony Perkins.[191][199][200] During the run of Romantic Comedy, the Barrymore Theatre became one of the first theaters to distribute electronic headsets to help hard-of-hearing visitors.[201] The theater also hosted a party in December 1979 to celebrate what would have been Ethel Barrymore's birthday.[202]

1980s and 1990sEdit

 
Stage door

The Barrymore continued to host hits in the early 1980s.[176] These included Lunch Hour, which opened in 1980 with Gilda Radner and Sam Waterston,[191][203][204] followed in 1981 by The West Side Waltz with Katharine Hepburn and Dorothy Loudon.[191][205][206] Hume Cronyn returned to the Barrymore in 1982, making his playwriting debut with Foxfire,[207] in which he costarred with Jessica Tandy and Keith Carradine.[208][209][210] This was followed at the end of 1983 by Baby,[211][212] which ran for 241 performances.[208][213] The next year, David Rabe's Hurlyburly transferred from off-Broadway[211][214] and ran for 343 performances.[215][216] The Barrymore's productions in 1986 included the solo show Lillian with Zoe Caldwell,[217][218] as well as Social Security, the latter of which ran for 385 performances through 1987.[219][220] The August Wilson musical Joe Turner's Come and Gone opened at the Barrymore in 1988.[221][222][223] The following year, the Barrymore hosted Metamorphosis with Mikhail Baryshnikov,[222][224] as well as a 12-performance run of David Hare's The Secret Rapture.[225][226] During the late 1980s, the Shuberts renovated the Barrymore as part of a restoration program for their Broadway theaters,[227] and the Shuberts also sold the Barrymore's air rights for development.[228]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started to consider protecting the Barrymore as a landmark in 1982,[229] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[230] The LPC designated the Barrymore's facade as a landmark on November 4, 1987,[231][232] followed by the interior on November 10.[231][233][234][c] This was part of the commission's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[235] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[236] The Shuberts, the Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Barrymore, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[237] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[238]

In 1990, the play Lettice and Lovage opened at the Barrymore, featuring Margaret Tyzack and Maggie Smith from the West End version of the play.[239][240][241] The next year, the Lincoln Center Theater brought Mule Bone, a never-performed play written in 1930 by Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston;[242][243] it ran at the Barrymore for 67 performances.[244][245] A limited revival of A Streetcar Named Desire, featuring Alec Baldwin and Jessica Lange, opened in 1992.[246][247] Afterward, the off-Broadway hit The Sisters Rosensweig moved to the Barrymore in 1993,[248] with 556 Broadway performances.[242][249] The play Indiscretions opened in 1995[250] and had 220 performances;[251][252][253] it was followed the next year by a 306-performance revival of Oscar Wilde's An Ideal Husband.[254][255] Cy Coleman's off-off-Broadway musical The Life transferred to the Barrymore in 1997[256][257] and saw 465 performances.[258][259] The Barrymore next hosted a revival of the Greek tragedy Electra in 1998,[260][261][262] then the West End hit Amy's View[263][261][264] and the musical Putting It Together in 1999.[265][266][267]

2000s to presentEdit

 
Sign board beside the theater

The Donmar Warehouse's production of The Real Thing[13][268][269] and the Manhattan Theatre Club's version of The Tale of the Allergist's Wife were both performed at the Barrymore in 2000.[270][271] The 777-performance run of The Tale of the Allergist's Wife[272][273] was followed by shorter runs of Imaginary Friends in 2002, Salome in 2003, and Sly Fox in 2004.[272][11] As part of a settlement with the United States Department of Justice in 2003, the Shuberts agreed to improve disabled access at their 16 landmarked Broadway theaters, including the Barrymore.[274][275] The Barrymore Theatre was then renovated for $9 million in 2004.[276] Next came a revival of Tennessee Williams's The Glass Menagerie in 2005 and the short-lived musical Ring of Fire in 2006.[272][11] Later in 2006, a revival of Stephen Sondheim's Company opened at the Barrymore, running for 247 performances.[277][278] The band Duran Duran, performing its album Red Carpet Massacre in November 2007,[279][280] was forced to relocate due to the 2007 Broadway stagehand strike.[272][281] The Barrymore's exterior was renovated as part of a two-year project that was completed in 2008.[282]

The Barrymore hosted three David Mamet plays in the late 2000s: November and Speed-the-Plow in 2008, as well as Race in 2009.[272][11] Eugène Ionesco's Exit the King was also performed at the Barrymore in 2009.[283][284] The 2010 play Elling had nine performances before it flopped.[285][286] This was followed in 2011 by the play Arcadia,[287] as well as a special appearance, An Evening with Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin.[288][289] The Barrymore hosted Death of a Salesman and Chaplin in 2012; Macbeth and Betrayal in 2013; and A Raisin in the Sun in 2014. With the exception of the musical Chaplin, these productions were all revivals of plays.[11] Next, the play The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time opened in late 2014 and ran for nearly two years.[290][291] When The Curious Incident closed, the food show presenter Alton Brown had a limited appearance at the Barrymore in November 2016.[292][293]

In 2017, the Barrymore hosted the plays The Present and Six Degrees of Separation.[10][11] At the end of the same year, the Barrymore staged the musical The Band's Visit, which ran through early 2019.[294][295] The play The Inheritance opened in November 2019[296][297] and was a few days short of its scheduled closing[298][299] when the Barrymore shuttered on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[300] The theater reopened on September 4, 2021, with a limited revival of Waitress,[301] which closed at the end of the year.[302] It was followed in April 2022 by the musical Paradise Square, which ran for three months.[303][304] The first Broadway revival of the play The Piano Lesson[305] opened at the theater in October 2022.[306]

Notable productionsEdit

1920s to 1990sEdit

2000s to presentEdit

Box office recordEdit

Waitress achieved the box office record for the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. It grossed $197,878 in ticket sales on September 3, 2021, breaking the previous single-performance house record at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre set by the production of Betrayal ($184,476).[368]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The Ambassador, Forrest (now O'Neill), and Ritz (now Walter Kerr) theaters still survive.[31] The other was the 49th Street Theatre at 235 West 49th Street, which was demolished in 1940.[33]
  2. ^ The actress celebrated her 49th birthday on August 15, 1928, while the theater was under construction.[38]
  3. ^ The LPC has 11 commissioners, and a landmark status is granted to a building if at least six commissioners vote in favor. Only six commissioners were present at the November 4 meeting, so they had to unanimously agree on any votes; this happened with the exterior but not the interior.[232] Of the ten commissioners at the November 10 meeting, six voted in favor of interior landmark status.[233]
  4. ^ The Telephone and The Medium were performed together.[124]
  5. ^ Black Comedy and White Lies were performed together.[172]
  6. ^ A Song at Twilight and Come Into the Garden, Maud were performed together and were billed as Noël Coward in Two Keys.[189]

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot; Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 301. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  4. ^ a b c "243 West 47 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Retrieved March 25, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Barrymore Theater Is Nearly Done". The Hartford Courant. November 12, 1928. p. 14. ProQuest 557601378.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Allen, Kelcey (September 25, 1928). "Amusements: Spanish Motif To Mark New Shubert House: Ethel Barrymore Theatre, Opening Late In October, Will Have Atmosphere In Keeping With Sierra's "The Kingdom Of God," First Attraction". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 37, no. 72. p. 12. ProQuest 1653502874.
  7. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  8. ^ New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission; Dolkart, Andrew S.; Postal, Matthew A. (2009). Postal, Matthew A. (ed.). Guide to New York City Landmarks (4th ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons. pp. 91–92. ISBN 978-0-470-28963-1.
  9. ^ a b "Ethel Barrymore Is Dead at 79; One of Stage's 'Royal Family'; Famed Actress Began Career at 14, Captivating Audiences With Voice and Manner Ethel Barrymore, the Famed Actress, Is Dead at 79". The New York Times. June 19, 1959. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  10. ^ a b c d "Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. September 22, 2021. Retrieved November 18, 2021.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g The Broadway League. "Ethel Barrymore Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  12. ^ a b c d e "Barrymore Theatre". Shubert Organization. Retrieved November 18, 2021.
  13. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 290.
  14. ^ Hofler, Robert (January 5, 2003). "Right up the Shuberts' alley". Variety. Vol. 389, no. 6. p. 36. ProQuest 236193715.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 19.
  16. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  17. ^ a b c d e f Morrison, William (1999). Broadway Theatres: History and Architecture. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications. p. 159. ISBN 0-486-40244-4.
  18. ^ a b c "Barrymore Theatre to Open Next Month; Ethel Barrymore to Inaugurate Her New Playhouse With 'The Kingdom of God.'". The New York Times. September 25, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  19. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 19–20.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Ethel Barrymore Opens New Theatre; Gives Premiere of "The Kingdom of God" in First Playhouse Here to Bear Her Name". The New York Times. December 21, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Ethel Barrymore Theater A Model of Taste and Utility". New York Herald Tribune. December 23, 1928. p. F5. ProQuest 1132677865.
  22. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 19.
  23. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 20–21.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 21.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 20.
  26. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  27. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 4.
  28. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 8.
  29. ^ Stagg 1968, p. 208.
  30. ^ Stagg 1968, p. 217.
  31. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 10.
  32. ^ Stagg 1968, p. 165.
  33. ^ "Cinema 49 in New York, NY". Cinema Treasures. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 22, 2021.
  34. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 11.
  35. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 279.
  36. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 67; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 279.
  37. ^ Allen, Kelcey (June 12, 1928). "Amusements: New Theatre Named For Ethel Barrymore". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 36, no. 137. pp. 5–6. ProQuest 1654063057.
  38. ^ a b "Ethel Barrymore, 49, Busy on Plans For Next Season: Actress Passes Anniversary at Home With Children After Coast-to-Coast Tour". New York Herald Tribune. August 16, 1928. p. 12. ProQuest 1113478391.
  39. ^ a b "Ethel Barrymore Opens On Own Stage Thursday". New York Herald Tribune. December 16, 1928. p. F5. ProQuest 1113509634.
  40. ^ "Barrymore Theatre; Ethel Barrymore to Appear in "The Kingdom of God" in New 47th Street Playhouse". The New York Times. November 30, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  41. ^ "Ethel Barrymore Opens Her New Theatre With "The Kingdom of God"". Daily News. December 22, 1928. p. 21. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  42. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 279; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  43. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  44. ^ Allen, Kelcey (January 17, 1929). "Amusements: Barrymore Library For Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 38, no. 12. p. 6. ProQuest 1699843306.
  45. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (April 16, 1929). "The Play; Love in Central Europe". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  46. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 279; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  47. ^ The Broadway League (April 15, 1929). "The Love Duel – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "The Love Duel Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  48. ^ "Two Plays to End Runs; "Skidding," in Its Second Year, and "The Love Duel," in Last Week". The New York Times. June 24, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  49. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 279.
  50. ^ The Broadway League (April 4, 1929). "Bird in Hand – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "Bird in Hand Broadway @ Morosco Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  51. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (December 27, 1929). "The Play; Death Falls in Love". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  52. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1929). "Death Takes a Holiday – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Death Takes a Holiday Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  53. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 18, 1930). "Topaze – Broadway Play – 1930 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Topaze Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  54. ^ The Broadway League (October 23, 1930). "His Majesty's Car – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "His Majesty's Car Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  55. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 25, 1930). "Scarlet Sister Mary – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "Scarlet Sister Mary Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  56. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 279; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  57. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (December 29, 1930). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  58. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 27, 1930). "The Truth Game – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "The Truth Game Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  59. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 279–280; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  60. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 16, 1931). "Melo – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Melo Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  61. ^ ""Modern Virgin" Deferred; "Melo" Will Not Reopen Here, but Will Go on Tour". The New York Times. July 29, 1931. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  62. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 280; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  63. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 10, 1931). "The School for Scandal – Broadway Play – 1931 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "The School for Scandal Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  64. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (November 11, 1931). "The Play; Ethel Barrymore as Lady Teazle in a Glamorous Revival of "The School for Scandal."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  65. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 280; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  66. ^ The Broadway League (January 19, 1932). "Whistling in the Dark – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "Whistling in the Dark Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  67. ^ The Broadway League (September 6, 1932). "Here Today – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "Here Today Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  68. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (September 7, 1932). "Ruth Gordon in "Here Today," a Comedy of Modern Bad Manners -- Opening of "Ballyhoo of 1932."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  69. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 27, 1932). "There's Always Juliet – Broadway Play – 1932 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "There's Always Juliet Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  70. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 68.
  71. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 29, 1932). "Gay Divorce – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Gay Divorce Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  72. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 30, 1932). "Fred Astaire in an Intimate Musical Farce Entitled "Gay Divorce."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  73. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 280.
  74. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 281; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  75. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 24, 1933). "Design For Living – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Design for Living Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  76. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 25, 1933). "Alfred Lunt, Lynn Fontanne, Noel Coward and an Artificial Comedy Entitled "Design for Living."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  77. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 281.
  78. ^ "Shuberts Deed Theatre Properties". The New York Times. April 28, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  79. ^ "Legitimate: Shubert Properties Deeded". The Billboard. Vol. 45, no. 19. May 13, 1933. p. 18. ProQuest 1032021129.
  80. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 17, 1935). "Lynn Fontanne and Alfred Lunt in Coward's 'Point Valaine' -- Opening of 'Creeping Fire.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  81. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 281; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  82. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 16, 1935). "Point Valaine – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Point Valaine Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  83. ^ "News of the Stage; ' Macbeth' Tonight -- 'Jumbo' Set Back to Oct. 26 -- Huston in 'Othello' This Season?". The New York Times. October 7, 1935. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  84. ^ The Broadway League (November 11, 1935). "Parnell – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "Parnell Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  85. ^ "News of the Stage; ' Bury the Dead' Will Open This Evening at the Ethel Barrymore -- 'Jumbo' Departs". The New York Times. April 18, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  86. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 281; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  87. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 28, 1936). "Night Must Fall – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Night Must Fall Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  88. ^ "News of the Stage; Broadway to See 'Night Must Fall' Before 'Love From a Stranger' -- One Opening Tonight". The New York Times. September 22, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  89. ^ "News of the Stage; ' The Women' Start Knitting Tonight at the Ethel Barrymore -- The Openings of Next Week". The New York Times. December 26, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  90. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 281; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  91. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1936). "The Women – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "The Women Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  92. ^ "Two Plays Ending Runs Here Tonight; ' The Women' and 'I'd Rather Be Right' Are Closing After Long Seasons". The New York Times. July 9, 1938. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  93. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 19, 1938). "Knickerbocker Holiday – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Knickerbocker Holiday Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  94. ^ "News of the Stage; Huston Expected to Be in 'Knickerbocker Holiday,' Opening at Barrymore Theatre in October O'Malley on Way Here Anent Federal Theatre". The New York Times. August 5, 1938. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  95. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 281–282; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  96. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 17, 1939). "No Time for Comedy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "No Time for Comedy Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  97. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 282; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  98. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 27, 1939). "Key Largo – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Key Largo Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  99. ^ "'Medicine Show' on Tonight's List; Living Newspaper Play to Be Given by Wharton-Gabel at the New Yorker Theatre". The New York Times. April 12, 1940. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  100. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 282.
  101. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 282; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  102. ^ "Christmas Brings Two Shows Here; 'Pal Joey,' Musical Comedy, to Be Seen at the Ethel Barrymore Tonight". The New York Times. December 25, 1940. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  103. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 25, 1940). "Pal Joey – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Pal Joey Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  104. ^ "Shubert Theatre to Get 'Pal Joey'; Musical, Closing Tomorrow at Barrymore, to Reopen Labor Day at Larger House". The New York Times. August 15, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  105. ^ "Musical Will Open at the Barrymore; ' Best Foot Forward' Tonight Will Be First of the Season to Appear on Broadway". The New York Times. October 1, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  106. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 1, 1941). "Best Foot Forward – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Best Foot Forward Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  107. ^ "Abbott's Musical Closes Saturday; ' Best Foot Forward' to Halt After 325 Performances -- To Reopen Late in August". The New York Times. June 30, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  108. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 282–283; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  109. ^ The Broadway League (October 8, 1942). "Count Me In – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "Count Me in Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  110. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 21, 1942). "The Three Sisters – Broadway Play – 1942 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "The Three Sisters Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  111. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 283; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  112. ^ "Play of Nazi Boy Will Open Tonight; Ideology of 12-Year-Old to Be Projected on Stage Here in 'Tomorrow the World'". The New York Times. April 14, 1943. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  113. ^ The Broadway League (April 14, 1943). "Tomorrow the World – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
    "Tomorrow the World Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  114. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 283.
  115. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 26, 1945). "The Barretts of Wimpole Street – Broadway Play – 1945 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "The Barretts of Wimpole Street Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  116. ^ Nichols, Lewis (April 1, 1945). "'Barretts of Wimpole Street'; The Return". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  117. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1945). "Pygmalion – Broadway Play – 1945 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Pygmalion Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  118. ^ Nichols, Lewis (December 27, 1945). "The Play in Review; 'Dunnigan's Daughter' Makes Its Broadway Debut at the Golden--Shaw's 'Pygmalion' Has Revival at Barrymore Miss Lawrence Returns". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  119. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 15, 1946). "The Duchess of Malfi – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "The Duchess of Malfi Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  120. ^ Calta, Louis (November 5, 1946). "'Duchess of Malfi' Will Leave Nov. 16; Bergner Play to Quit After 38 Performances at Barrymore --Star Has New Role". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  121. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 283; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  122. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 8, 1946). "Cyrano de Bergerac – Broadway Play – 1946 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Cyrano de Bergerac Broadway @ Alvin Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  123. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (May 11, 1947). "Words and Music; Menotti's Two Operas, 'The Telephone' And 'The Medium,' Come to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  124. ^ a b c The Broadway League (May 1, 1947). "The Telephone / The Medium – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "The Telephone / The Medium Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  125. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  126. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 283; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  127. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 4, 1947). "First Night at the Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  128. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 3, 1947). "A Streetcar Named Desire – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "A Streetcar Named Desire Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  129. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 15, 1950). "The Consul – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Consul Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  130. ^ Downes, Olin (March 16, 1950). "Menotti 'Consul' Has Its Premiere; Scene From Menotti's 'the Consul'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  131. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 285; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  132. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 15, 1950). "At the Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  133. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 283–285; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  134. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 14, 1950). "Bell, Book and Candle – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Bell, Book and Candle Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  135. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 25, 1951). "First Night at the Theatre; Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn in Two-Character Play About Marriage". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  136. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 285; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  137. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 24, 1951). "The Fourposter – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Fourposter Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  138. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 285; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  139. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 6, 1953). "Misalliance – Broadway Play – 1953 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Misalliance Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  140. ^ Shanley, J. P. (February 21, 1953). "The Show Goes on for 'Misalliance'; City Center Will Present Shaw Revival at Barrymore After Run at Civic Playhouse". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  141. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 1, 1953). "First Night at the Theatre; Deborah Kerr Stars in 'Tea and Sympathy' at the Ethel Barrymore Playhouse". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  142. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 30, 1953). "Tea and Sympathy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Tea and Sympathy Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  143. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 285; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  144. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 10, 1955). "The Desperate Hours – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Desperate Hours Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  145. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 11, 1955). "Theatre: The Guests Came From Jail; Family Is Held Captive in 'Desperate Hours'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  146. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 20, 1955). "Marcel Marceau – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Marcel Marceau Broadway @ Phoenix Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  147. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 26, 1955). "The Chalk Garden – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Chalk Garden Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  148. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 27, 1955). "The Theatre: Sparkling Cut Glass; ' Chalk Garden' Opens at Barrymore". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  149. ^ The Broadway League (June 14, 1956). "New Faces of 1956 – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "New Faces of 1956 Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  150. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 285.
  151. ^ Valente, Brooks Atkinsonalfredo (November 29, 1957). "The Theatre:'Look Homeward, Angel'; Luminous Adaptation of Wolfe Novel Opens The Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  152. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 28, 1957). "Look Homeward, Angel – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Look Homeward, Angel Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  153. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 12, 1959). "The Theatre: 'A Raisin in the Sun'; Negro Drama Given at Ethel Barrymore". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  154. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 285; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  155. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 11, 1959). "A Raisin in the Sun – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "A Raisin in the Sun Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  156. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 16, 1959). "A Majority of One – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "A Majority of One Broadway @ Sam S. Shubert Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  157. ^ a b "Majority of One' to Close June 25; Comedy to End After 570th Showing -- French Star Is Signed by 'Molly Brown'". The New York Times. May 16, 1960. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  158. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 14, 1960). "Critic's Choice – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Critic's Choice Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  159. ^ Taubman, Howard (December 15, 1960). "Theatre: Integrity Comes First in 'Critic's Choice'; Comedy by Ira Levin in Debut at Barrymore Henry Fonda Stars as Drama Reviewer Whose Playwright-Wife Feels Barbs". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  160. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 285; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  161. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 1, 1961). "The Complaisant Lover – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Complaisant Lover Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  162. ^ Taubman, Howard (November 2, 1961). "'Complaisant Lover' in Debut at Barrymore; Redgrave in Work by Graham Greene". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  163. ^ The Broadway League (February 22, 1962). "A Gift of Time – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
    "A Gift of Time Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  164. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 15, 1965). "The Amen Corner – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Amen Corner Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  165. ^ Taubman, Howard (April 16, 1965). "Theater: 'The Amen Corner,' Baldwin's First Play; 12-Year-Old Drama Is Staged at Barrymore". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  166. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 285; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  167. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 2, 1966). "Wait Until Dark – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Wait Until Dark Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  168. ^ Kauffmann, Stanley (February 3, 1966). "Theater: Lee Remick Stars in 'Wait Until Dark'; Mystery Drama Bows at Ethel Barrymore". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  169. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 16, 1966). "Les Ballets Africains – Broadway Special – 1966 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Les Ballets Africains Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  170. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 17, 1966). "Dance: Les Ballets Africains Opens at Barrymore; Exciting Show Offered by Guinean Troupe Parisian Design Linked to Primitive Energy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  171. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 285–286; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  172. ^ a b c The Broadway League (February 12, 1967). "Black Comedy / White Lies – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Black Comedy / White Lies Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  173. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 286; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  174. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 10, 1969). "The Front Page – Broadway Play – 1969 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Front Page Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  175. ^ Barnes, Clive (May 12, 1969). "Theater: 'Front Page' Gaily Revived; Hecht-MacArthur Play at Ethel Barrymore Period Style Retained -- Costumes Helpful". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  176. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 286; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 18.
  177. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 286; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  178. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 12, 1970). "Conduct Unbecoming – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Conduct Unbecoming Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  179. ^ Barnes, Clive (October 13, 1970). "Theater: Good Whodunit". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  180. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 15, 1971). "The Philanthropist – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Philanthropist Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  181. ^ "'Philanthropist' to Close". The New York Times. May 15, 1971. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  182. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 20, 1971). "Ain't Supposed to Die a Natural Death – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Ain't Supposed to Die a Natural Death Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  183. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 25, 1973). "The Visit – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Visit Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  184. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 26, 1973). "Stage: 'Visit' Opens Phoenix Season". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  185. ^ The Broadway League (November 26, 1973). "Chemin de Fer – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
    "Chemin de Fer Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  186. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 27, 1973). "Stage: 'Chemin de Fer'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  187. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1973). "Holiday – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Holiday Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  188. ^ Barnes, Clive (December 27, 1973). "Stage: Having a Wonderful 'Holiday'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  189. ^ a b c The Broadway League (February 28, 1974). "Noël Coward in Two Keys – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
    "Noël Coward in Two Keys Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  190. ^ Barnes, Clive (March 1, 1974). "Stage: Hume Cronyn Dances Through 'Coward in Two Keys'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  191. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 286; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  192. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 30, 1975). "Travesties – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Travesties Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  193. ^ Leonard, John (November 14, 1975). "Critic's Notebook: Stoppard 'Travesties' Stirs New Thoughts of Lenin and Zurich". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  194. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 16, 1977). "American Buffalo – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "American Buffalo Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  195. ^ Barnes, Clive (February 17, 1977). "Stage: Skilled 'American Buffalo'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  196. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 286; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  197. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 17, 1977). "I Love My Wife – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "I Love My Wife Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  198. ^ Barnes, Clive (April 18, 1977). "Stage: Tuneful 'I Love My Wife'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  199. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 8, 1979). "Romantic Comedy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Romantic Comedy Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  200. ^ Kerr, Walter (November 9, 1979). "Stage: Slade's 'Romantic Comedy'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  201. ^ Shepard, Richard F. (February 18, 1980). "Theaters Starting to Aid the Deaf; Company Paid for Installation Expansion Considered Other Aids Planned". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  202. ^ Buckley, Tom (December 18, 1979). "Broadway Pays Tribute to Ethel Barrymore". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  203. ^ Rich, Frank (November 13, 1980). "Stage: Jean Kerr's 'Lunch Hour' Opens at Barrymore Theater; From Pretense to Tense". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  204. ^ The Broadway League. "Lunch Hour – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Lunch Hour Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  205. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 19, 1981). "The West Side Waltz – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The West Side Waltz Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  206. ^ Rich, Frank (November 20, 1981). "Stage: Miss Hepburn Saves Us a 'Waltz'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  207. ^ Lawson, Carol (August 6, 1982). "Broadway; For Hume Cronyn, Broadway debut as a playwright". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  208. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 286; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  209. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 11, 1982). "Foxfire – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Foxfire Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  210. ^ Rich, Frank (November 12, 1982). "Theater: Jessica Tandy in 'Foxfire'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  211. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 286.
  212. ^ Rich, Frank (December 5, 1983). "Stage: 'Baby,' a Musical Exploring Parenthood". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  213. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 4, 1983). "Baby – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Baby Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  214. ^ Bennetts, Leslie (July 18, 1984). "Inside the Ensemble Play of 'Hurlyburly'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  215. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 7, 1984). "Hurlyburly – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Hurlyburly Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  216. ^ "'Hurlyburly' Closes". The New York Times. June 4, 1985. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  217. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 286.
  218. ^ Rich, Frank (January 17, 1986). "The Stage: Zoe Caldwell as Hellman in 'Lillian'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  219. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 17, 1986). "Social Security – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Social Security Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  220. ^ "'Social Security' to Close". The New York Times. March 19, 1987. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  221. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 27, 1988). "Joe Turner's Come and Gone – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Joe Turner's Come and Gone Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  222. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 286–287.
  223. ^ Rich, Frank (March 28, 1988). "Review/Theater; Panoramic History Of Blacks in America In Wilson's 'Joe Turner'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  224. ^ Rich, Frank (March 7, 1989). "Review/Theater; Baryshnikov in 'Metamorphosis'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  225. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 26, 1989). "The Secret Rapture – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Secret Rapture Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  226. ^ "'Secret Rapture' Closing". The New York Times. November 4, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  227. ^ Bennetts, Leslie (April 22, 1986). "Theater Gets Raves for Decor". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  228. ^ Scardino, Albert (June 13, 1987). "New Offices Changing the Theater District". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  229. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  230. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). "Is the final curtain near?". New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  231. ^ a b "Legitimate: Landmarks Panel Names 5 Theaters". Variety. Vol. 329, no. 3. November 11, 1987. p. 93. ProQuest 1286133538.
  232. ^ a b Dunlap, David W. (November 5, 1987). "5 More Broadway Theaters Classified as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 14, 2019. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  233. ^ a b Dunlap, David W. (November 11, 1987). "Three Manhattan Theaters Are Given Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 24, 2021.
  234. ^ Shepard, Joan; Lippman, Barbara (November 11, 1987). "3 theaters get landmark status". New York Daily News. p. 79. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  235. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). "The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  236. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (March 12, 1988). "28 Theaters Are Approved as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  237. ^ Dunlap, David W. (June 21, 1988). "Owners File Suit to Revoke Theaters' Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  238. ^ Dunlap, David W. (May 27, 1992). "High Court Upholds Naming Of 22 Theaters as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  239. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 287.
  240. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 25, 1990). "Lettice and Lovage – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Lettice and Lovage Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  241. ^ Rich, Frank (March 26, 1990). "Review/Theater; One and Many Maggie Smiths". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  242. ^ a b c d e f Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 287.
  243. ^ Rich, Frank (February 15, 1991). "Review/Theater; A Difficult Birth For 'Mule Bone'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  244. ^ "'Mule Bone' to Close". The New York Times. April 11, 1991. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  245. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 14, 1991). "Mule Bone – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Mule Bone Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  246. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 12, 1992). "A Streetcar Named Desire – Broadway Play – 1992 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "A Streetcar Named Desire Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  247. ^ Rich, Frank (April 13, 1992). "Review/Theater: A Streetcar Named Desire; Alec Baldwin Does Battle With the Ghosts". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  248. ^ "Review/Theater; The Sisters Rosensweig Take Up Residence on Broadway". The New York Times. March 19, 1993. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  249. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 18, 1993). "The Sisters Rosensweig – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Sisters Rosensweig Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  250. ^ Canby, Vincent (April 28, 1995). "Theater Review: Indiscretions; Cocteau's Ferocious View Of the Rolls-Royce of Families". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  251. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 287–288.
  252. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 1995). "Indiscretions – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Indiscretions Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  253. ^ "'Indiscretions' Closing". The New York Times. October 31, 1995. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  254. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 1, 1996). "An Ideal Husband – Broadway Play – 1996 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "An Ideal Husband Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  255. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 288.
  256. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 288.
  257. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 28, 1997). "Lively Women, but Very Tired". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  258. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 26, 1997). "The Life – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Life Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  259. ^ "'The Life' Is Closing". The New York Times. June 4, 1998. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  260. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 3, 1998). "Electra – Broadway Play – 1998 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Electra Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  261. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 68; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 289.
  262. ^ Canby, Vincent (December 13, 1998). "Theater; An 'Electra' Powerfully Current". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  263. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 15, 1999). "Amy's View – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Amy's View Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  264. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 16, 1999). "Theater Review; Stardom Drives 'Amy's View'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  265. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 21, 1999). "Putting It Together – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Putting It Together Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  266. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 69; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 289.
  267. ^ Brantley, Ben (November 22, 1999). "Theater Review; Side by Side, a Veiled Spirit And a Heart Upon the Sleeve". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  268. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 17, 2000). "The Real Thing – Broadway Play – 2000 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Real Thing Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  269. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 18, 2000). "Theater Review; Poor Henry! He's So Clever, So Glib . . . So Vulnerable". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  270. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 69; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 290.
  271. ^ "Theater Review; Skidding as She Chases Profundity". The New York Times. November 3, 2000. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  272. ^ a b c d e "At This Theatre: Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  273. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 2, 2000). "The Tale of the Allergist's Wife – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Tale of the Allergist's Wife Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  274. ^ Tavernise, Sabrina (September 26, 2003). "Shuberts Revamp 16 Theaters, Improving Access for Disabled". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  275. ^ "Broadway theaters accessible to disabled". Press and Sun-Bulletin. September 28, 2003. p. 68. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  276. ^ Collins, Glenn (May 3, 2008). "On Broadway, Revivals Aren't Only for Shows". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  277. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 29, 2006). "Company – Broadway Musical – 2006 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Company Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  278. ^ a b "Despite Honors, Misery for 'Company'". The New York Times. June 14, 2007. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  279. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 1, 2007). "Duran Duran: Red Carpet Massacre – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Duran Duran: Red Carpet Massacre Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  280. ^ a b Ryzik, Melena (November 3, 2007). "Duran Duran Continues Its Revival With a Debut on a Broadway Stage". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  281. ^ "Mayor's Offer of Mediator in Theater Strike Goes Nowhere". The New York Times. November 13, 2007. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  282. ^ Sommers, Michael W. (July 6, 2008). "Renovations spur another wave of change for Times Square". nj. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  283. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 26, 2009). "Exit the King – Broadway Play – 2009 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
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  284. ^ a b McGee, Celia (February 19, 2009). "Geoffrey Rush". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  285. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 21, 2010). "Elling – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
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  286. ^ a b Healy, Patrick (November 25, 2010). "'Elling' to Close on Broadway". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  287. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 17, 2011). "Arcadia – Broadway Play – 2011 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
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  288. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 21, 2011). "An Evening with Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "An Evening with Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  289. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (November 22, 2011). "Old Friends Reunited Once Again". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  290. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 5, 2014). "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  291. ^ Brantley, Ben (October 6, 2014). "Plotting the Grid of Sensory Overload". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  292. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 22, 2016). "Alton Brown Live: Eat Your Science – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Alton Brown Live: Eat Your Science Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  293. ^ a b Soloski, Alexis (November 24, 2016). "Review: Alton Brown, a Mad Culinary Scientist in a Broadway Laboratory". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  294. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 9, 2017). "The Band's Visit – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Band's Visit Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  295. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (November 10, 2017). "Review: 'The Band's Visit' Is a Ravishing Musical That Whispers With Romance". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  296. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 17, 2019). "The Inheritance – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Inheritance Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  297. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (November 18, 2019). "'The Inheritance' Review: So Many Men, So Much Time". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  298. ^ Lang, Brent (February 20, 2020). "'The Inheritance' Closing in March After Box Office Struggles". Variety. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  299. ^ "Supersized play 'The Inheritance' sets Broadway closing date". EW.com. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  300. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 12, 2020). "Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  301. ^ Paulson, Michael (September 3, 2021). "Musicals Return to Broadway With 'Waitress' and 'Hadestown'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  302. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 2, 2021). "Waitress – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Waitress Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  303. ^ a b The Broadway League. "Paradise Square – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Paradise Square (Broadway, Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  304. ^ a b Green, Jesse (April 4, 2022). "Review: In 'Paradise Square,' Racial Harmony Turns to Discord". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 4, 2022.
  305. ^ a b Wild, Stephi (July 26, 2022). "August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON Will Now Open at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre Rather Than the St. James". Broadway World. Retrieved July 26, 2022.
  306. ^ a b The Broadway League. "The Piano Lesson – Broadway Play – 2022 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved July 26, 2022.
    "The Piano Lesson (Broadway, Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. March 29, 2022. Retrieved July 26, 2022.
  307. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  308. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  309. ^ The Broadway League (May 21, 1933). "Both Your Houses – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Both Your Houses Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  310. ^ The Broadway League (December 26, 1934). "Ruth Draper – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Ruth Draper Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  311. ^ The Broadway League (September 27, 1935). "Othello – Broadway Play – 1935 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Othello Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  312. ^ The Broadway League (October 7, 1935). "Macbeth – Broadway Play – 1935 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Macbeth Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  313. ^ The Broadway League (April 18, 1936). "Bury the Dead – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Bury the Dead Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  314. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  315. ^ The Broadway League (December 3, 1942). "R. U. R. – Broadway Play – 1942 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "R. U. R. Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  316. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  317. ^ The Broadway League (January 18, 1945). "Rebecca – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Rebecca Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  318. ^ The Broadway League (July 18, 1945). "Marinka – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Marinka Broadway @ Winter Garden Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  319. ^ The Broadway League (December 22, 1949). "The Rat Race – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Rat Race Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  320. ^ The Broadway League (December 2, 1952). "I've Got Sixpence – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "I've Got Sixpence Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  321. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  322. ^ The Broadway League (January 3, 1957). "Small War on Murray Hill – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Small War on Murray Hill Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  323. ^ The Broadway League (January 21, 1957). "Waiting for Godot – Broadway Play – 1957 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Waiting for Godot Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  324. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  325. ^ The Broadway League (September 20, 1960). "The Hostage – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Hostage Broadway @ Cort Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  326. ^ The Broadway League (November 28, 1962). "Moby Dick – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Moby Dick Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  327. ^ The Broadway League (February 11, 1964). "The Passion of Josef D. – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Passion of Josef D. Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  328. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  329. ^ The Broadway League (October 19, 1966). "We Have Always Lived in the Castle – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "We Have Always Lived in the Castle Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  330. ^ The Broadway League (October 26, 1967). "The Little Foxes – Broadway Play – 1967 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Little Foxes Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  331. ^ The Broadway League (November 17, 1966). "Don't Drink the Water – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Don't Drink the Water Broadway @ Morosco Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  332. ^ The Broadway League (March 27, 1968). "The Seven Descents of Myrtle – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Seven Descents of Myrtle Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  333. ^ The Broadway League (May 11, 1968). "Happiness Is Just a Little Thing Called a Rolls Royce – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Happiness Is Just a Little Thing Called a Rolls Royce Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  334. ^ The Broadway League (December 3, 1968). "The Goodbye People – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Goodbye People Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  335. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  336. ^ The Broadway League (April 17, 1972). "Captain Brassbound's Conversion – Broadway Play – 1972 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Captain Brassbound's Conversion Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  337. ^ The Broadway League (May 16, 1972). "Don't Play Us Cheap! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Don't Play Us Cheap! Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  338. ^ The Broadway League (February 26, 1975). "The Night That Made America Famous – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Night That Made America Famous Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  339. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  340. ^ The Broadway League (May 13, 1976). "Legend – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Legend Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  341. ^ The Broadway League (October 20, 1976). "Poor Murderer – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Poor Murderer Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  342. ^ The Broadway League (May 7, 1982). "Is there life after high school? – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Is There Life After High School? Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  343. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  344. ^ The Broadway League (November 17, 1988). "Rumors – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Rumors Broadway @ Broadhurst Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  345. ^ The Broadway League (December 12, 2002). "Imaginary Friends – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Imaginary Friends Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  346. ^ The Broadway League (April 30, 2003). "Salome – Broadway Play – 2003 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Salome Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  347. ^ The Broadway League (April 1, 2004). "Sly Fox – Broadway Play – 2004 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Sly Fox Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  348. ^ The Broadway League (March 22, 2005). "The Glass Menagerie – Broadway Play – 2005 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Glass Menagerie Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  349. ^ The Broadway League (March 12, 2006). "Ring of Fire – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Ring of Fire Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  350. ^ The Broadway League (January 17, 2008). "November – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "November Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  351. ^ The Broadway League (October 23, 2008). "Speed-the-Plow – Broadway Play – 2008 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Speed-the-Plow Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  352. ^ The Broadway League (December 6, 2009). "Race – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Race Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  353. ^ The Broadway League (March 15, 2012). "Death of a Salesman – Broadway Play – 2012 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Death of a Salesman Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  354. ^ Healy, Patrick (May 16, 2012). "'Salesman' Revival on Broadway to Turn a Profit". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  355. ^ The Broadway League (September 10, 2012). "Chaplin – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Chaplin Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  356. ^ Schuessler, Jennifer (December 3, 2012). "'Chaplin' to Close Next Month". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  357. ^ The Broadway League (April 21, 2013). "Macbeth – Broadway Play – 2013 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Macbeth Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  358. ^ Piepenburg, Erik (May 7, 2013). "In Performance: Alan Cumming of 'Macbeth'". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  359. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 2013). "Betrayal – Broadway Play – 2013 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Betrayal Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  360. ^ Healy, Patrick (October 7, 2013). "Record Sales for Broadway's 'Betrayal'". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  361. ^ The Broadway League (April 3, 2014). "A Raisin in the Sun – Broadway Play – 2014 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "A Raisin in the Sun Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  362. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 4, 2014). "No Rest for the Weary". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  363. ^ Chow, Andrew R. (March 22, 2016). "'Curious Incident' to Close in September". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  364. ^ The Broadway League (January 8, 2017). "The Present – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "The Present Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  365. ^ Brantley, Ben (January 9, 2017). "Review: 'The Present': Even in Russia, It's Hard to Turn 40". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  366. ^ The Broadway League (April 25, 2017). "Six Degrees of Separation – Broadway Play – 2017 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
    "Six Degrees of Separation Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  367. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 26, 2017). "Review: A Scam Artist's Masterwork in 'Six Degrees of Separation'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  368. ^ Wild, Stephi. "WAITRESS Sets New House Record at Broadway's Ethel Barrymore Theatre". BroadwayWorld.com. Retrieved November 4, 2021.

SourcesEdit

External linksEdit