Eidskog is a municipality in Innlandet county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Vinger. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Skotterud. Other villages in the municipality include Magnor, Matrand, and Åbogen.

Eidskog kommune
View of Magnor
View of Magnor
Flag of Eidskog kommune
Coat of arms of Eidskog kommune
Official logo of Eidskog kommune
Eidskog within Innlandet
Eidskog within Innlandet
Coordinates: 59°59′53″N 12°3′38″E / 59.99806°N 12.06056°E / 59.99806; 12.06056Coordinates: 59°59′53″N 12°3′38″E / 59.99806°N 12.06056°E / 59.99806; 12.06056
CountryNorway
CountyInnlandet
DistrictVinger / Glåmdal
Established1 Jan 1864
 • Preceded byVinger Municipality
Administrative centreSkotterud
Government
 • Mayor (2015)Kamilla Thue (Ap)
Area
 • Total640.40 km2 (247.26 sq mi)
 • Land603.36 km2 (232.96 sq mi)
 • Water37.04 km2 (14.30 sq mi)  5.8%
 • Rank#181 in Norway
Population
 (2022)
 • Total6,032
 • Rank#158 in Norway
 • Density10/km2 (30/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
Decrease −4.1%
DemonymEidskoging[1]
Official language
 • Norwegian formBokmål
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-3416
WebsiteOfficial website

The 640-square-kilometre (250 sq mi) municipality is the 181st largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Eidskog is the 155th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 6,032. The municipality's population density is 10 inhabitants per square kilometre (26/sq mi) and its population has decreased by 4.1% over the previous 10-year period.[3][4]

General informationEdit

The municipality was established on 1 January 1864 when the old Vinger Municipality was divided in two: Vinger (population: 6,226) in the north and Eidskog (population: 6,920) in the south. On 1 January 1986, the northern part of the Åbogen area (population: 14) was transferred from Kongsvinger Municipality to Eidskog Municipality.[5]

NameEdit

The municipality was named Eidskog (historically spelled Eidskogen). The Old Norse form of the name was Eiðaskógr. The first element is the plural genitive case of eið which means "path between two lakes". The last element is skógr which means "woods". Thus the name means "the woods with the many eiðs". (In historical times people traveled in small boats on the lakes and the rivers, but they had to drag the boats over the eids.)[6]

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms was granted on 12 September 1986. The arms show a gray background with a black grouse, a common inhabitant of the many forests in the municipality. Forestry is also one of the main sources of income in the area.[7]

ChurchesEdit

The Church of Norway has two parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Eidskog. It is part of the Solør, Vinger og Odal prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Hamar.

Churches in Eidskog
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Eidskog Eidskog Church Matrand 1665
Magnor Church Magnor 1923
Vestmarka Vestmarka Church Vestmarka 1883

GeographyEdit

The municipality is located in the southeastern part of Innlandet county. It is bordered to the north by the municipality of Kongsvinger (in Innlandet) and in the west by Aurskog-Høland, Nes (both in Viken and Sør-Odal (in Innlandet). Eidskog also borders Sweden, both to the east and south.

The lakes Digeren, Mangen, and Skjervangen are all located in Eidskog.

HistoryEdit

Number of minorities (1st and 2nd generation) in Eidskog by country of origin in 2017[8]
Ancestry Number
  Sweden 138
  Lithuania 33
  Thailand 29
  Syria 26
  Poland 24
  Germany 23
  Denmark 21

The name Eidskog is ancient and was used for the southern part of Vinger, the region between today's Kongsvinger in Norway and Arvika in Sweden. The Vinger Royal Road (Norwegian: Eskoleia) historically traveled through Eidskog (and continues today as the Norwegian National Road 2). It was one of the most important traffic arteries between Norway and Sweden. The name Eidskog was already in use during the saga period and became, after the canonization of Saint Olaf and important pilgrim's route from Europe to Nidaros Cathedral. During the 12th century, the Eidskog Church was built. It was a stave church built in Midtskog (which means Norwegian: middle of the woods). The present Eidskog Church is built on the same site (now called Matrand) and this building was constructed in 1665.

The way through Eidskog was also militarily important and many times through history has been the point of Swedish strikes into Hedmark. To defend against these assaults, a number of fortifications were built in the vicinity, including ones at Magnor and Matrand, but the chief fortification was Kongsvinger Fortress (to the north).

The last Swedish attack through Eidskog was in 1814 when Major General Carl Pontus Gahn on July 31 crossed the border and marched against Kongsvinger. His forces were stopped at Lier outside Kongsvinger on 2 August 1814 by troops led by Lieutenant Colonel Andreas Samuel Krebs (1769-1818) and retreated to Eidskog. On 4 August 1814, Krebs followed after to drive Swedish troops off Norwegian territory. The two forces met in the Battle of Matrand which was the bloodiest battle of the war and ended with a Norwegian victory.

Later in 1814, Norway was joined in union with Sweden and the confrontations at the Eidskog border ended.

The Soot Canal, constructed in 1849, has Norway's oldest sluice gates. It was the work of Engebret Soot (1786–1859). It was built to allow timber to be transported (floated) to the Halden sawmills. The canal was 1.5 kilometres (0.9 mi) long and had 16 locks which extended from Lake Skjervangen at 185 metres (607 ft) above sea level up to Lake Mortsjølungen at 201 metres (659 ft) above sea level.

The route through Eidskog became an important connection between the two countries; this was strengthened with the opening of the Grenseban railway in 1862, which connected Christiania to Stockholm.

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Eidskog, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elects a mayor.[9] The municipality falls under the Romerike og Glåmdal District Court and the Eidsivating Court of Appeal.

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Eidskog is made up of 25 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Eidskog kommunestyre 2020–2023 [10]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:25
Eidskog kommunestyre 2016–2019 [11][12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:25
Eidskog kommunestyre 2012–2015 [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 2008–2011 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 2004–2007 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 2000–2003 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1996–1999 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1992–1995 [15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1988–1991 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1984–1987 [17]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)21
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1980–1983 [18]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1976–1979 [19]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1972–1975 [20]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1968–1971 [21]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:29
Eidskog kommunestyre 1964–1967 [22]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)21
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:29
Eidskog herredsstyre 1960–1963 [23]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:29
Eidskog herredsstyre 1956–1959 [24]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)4
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)3
Total number of members:29
Eidskog herredsstyre 1952–1955 [25]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)4
Total number of members:28
Eidskog herredsstyre 1948–1951 [26]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)6
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)4
Total number of members:28
Eidskog herredsstyre 1945–1947 [27]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)7
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)4
Total number of members:28
Eidskog herredsstyre 1938–1941* [28]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)2
Total number of members:28
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

MayorsEdit

The mayors of Eidskog:

  • 1864-1872: Henry T. Fearnley
  • 1872-1879: Haagen Pedersen Malmer
  • 1879-1895: Meldal Johnsen
  • 1895-1897: O. Løken
  • 1897-1905: Hans Taugbøl
  • 1905-1907: O. Løken
  • 1908-1913: Otto Pramm[29]
  • 1913-1915: Ole Syversen Fagernæs (V)
  • 1915: M. T. Huse
  • 1915-1916: Olof Nilsson[30]
  • 1917-1919: Otto Pramm
  • 1920-1922: H. A. Rambøl
  • 1923-1928: Thorvald Taugbøl
  • 1929-1934: Kaspar Billerud
  • 1935-1945: Selmer Alm (Ap)
  • 1945-1947: Hallgrim Sørli (Ap)
  • 1948-1963: Sigurd Skjørberg
  • 1964-1981: Ivar Delviken
  • 1982-1983: Kaare Fjeld
  • 1984-1999: Kåre Delviken
  • 1999-2005: Ivar Skulstad (Ap)
  • 2005-2007: Greta Storm Ofteland (Ap)
  • 2007-2015: Knut Gustav Woie (Sp)
  • 2015–present: Kamilla Thue (Ap)
 
Peace Monument in Morokulien

AttractionsEdit

Notable residentsEdit

 
Erik Werenskiold, 1880

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  6. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Hedmarkens amt (in Norwegian) (3 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 218.
  7. ^ "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  8. ^ "Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, by immigration category, country background and percentages of the population". ssb.no. Archived from the original on 29 July 2017. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  9. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (12 May 2016). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  10. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  11. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2015 - Hedmark". Valg Direktoratet.
  12. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  13. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Hedmark". Valg Direktoratet.
  14. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996.
  15. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993.
  16. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988.
  17. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984.
  18. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979.
  19. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977.
  20. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973.
  21. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967.
  22. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964.
  23. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960.
  24. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957.
  25. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952.
  26. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948.
  27. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947.
  28. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938.
  29. ^ "Eidskog herredsstyre". Hedemarkens Amtstidende. 8 July 1910. Retrieved 16 December 2015.
  30. ^ "Eidskogen herredsstyre". Hedemarkens Amtstidende. 14 December 1915. Retrieved 16 December 2015.
  31. ^ "Om Oss". MaxIvan (in Norwegian Bokmål). 22 June 2012. Retrieved 15 June 2019.

External linksEdit