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Clube de Futebol Os Belenenses, commonly known as Belenenses (Portuguese pronunciation: [bɨlɨˈnẽsɨʃ]), is a Portuguese sports club best known for its football team. Founded in 1919, it is one of the oldest Portuguese sports clubs. It is based in the 25,000-seat Estádio do Restelo in the Belém parish of Lisbon, hence the club name, which translates as "The ones from Belém". Among its fanbase, the club is commonly nicknamed O Belém, in reference to the neighborhood; Os Pastéis (The Pastries), in reference to a traditional Portuguese pastry originated in the parish; Azuis (Blues) or Azuis do Restelo (The Blues from Restelo), in reference to the club's color and its home ground; and A Cruz de Cristo (The Order of Christ Cross), for its emblem, or also "Os Rapazes da Praia" (The Boys of the Beach), a reference to the zone of Belém in the earlier 20 Century.

Belenenses
Os Belenenses.png
Full nameClube de Futebol
Os Belenenses
Nickname(s)O Belém
(The Bethlehem)
Os Azuis do Restelo
(The Blues from Restelo)
Pastéis (Pastries)
A Cruz de Cristo
(The Order of Christ Cross)
Founded23 September 1919; 99 years ago (23 September 1919)
GroundEstádio do Restelo
Capacity19,856[1]
PresidentPatrick Morais de Carvalho
Head coachNuno Oliveira
LeagueI Divisão da AFL
WebsiteClub website

Belenenses won the 1945–46 Primeira Liga, making them the first club other than the Big Three to win the league title. Belenenses has also won six Championship of Portugal/Portuguese Cup trophies, and is the fifth most decorated team in Portuguese football.

Until 1982, Belenenses was one of four teams that had never been relegated from the first division. Nowadays, it is the team with the fourth most seasons in the Primeira Liga as well as the team with the fourth most points in the championship's history.[citation needed]

Belenenses was the first Portuguese team with a turf pitch and artificial lighting, and was also the first Portuguese club to participate in the UEFA Europa League.[citation needed]

The main sports of the club are football, handball, basketball, futsal, athletics, and rugby union. The club has won national championships in all these sports, but it remains best known for football, its original activity. In the club's history, Belenenses has won more than 10,000 trophies, including the first divisions of football, handball, basketball, rugby, and the Portuguese Cup in football and futsal, among other sports.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Early yearsEdit

Founded in 1919, it reached its first Campeonato final in 1926, losing 2–0 to Marítimo, and won the title the next season with a 3–0 win over Vitória de Setúbal and winning a second championship in 1929. The club lost the 1932 title to Porto 2–1 in a replay after a 4–4 draw. The club won its third and final Campeonato in 1933 after defeating Sporting CP 3–1.[2] With three Campeonato wins, Belenenses was one of Portugal's "Big Four". Since the advent of the Primeira Liga, Os Belenenses has failed to keep up with the other three clubs (Benfica, FC Porto and Sporting CP).

League championsEdit

The club won its only Primeira Liga title in 1945–46, edging Benfica by one point,[3] the first time that a club outside the Big Three won the title. On 14 December 1947, they were the first team to face Real Madrid at their newly inaugurated Santiago Bernabéu Stadium (then called the Nuevo Estadio Chamartín) in a friendly match won 3–1 by Madrid.[4] The club were runners-up in the league for the first time in the 1954–55 season, level on 39 points with Benfica.[5] It was not until 1973 that Belenenses finished runner-up again, 18 points behind Benfica, and they never have since.[6]

European foraysEdit

Belenenses were the first club to compete in the UEFA Cup in a two-legged 3–3 draw with Hibernian at the Estádio do Restelo in Belém.

The club has also played in the European Cup Winners' Cup. In the 1987–88 UEFA Cup, the club played Barcelona. In the first leg, they lost 2–0 in the Camp Nou, winning 1–0 at the Estádio do Restelo with Mapuata scoring. Belenenses won their sixth (and to date last) Taça de Portugal on 28 May 1989, defeating Benfica 2–1.[7] Also that season, they knocked out the holders Bayer Leverkusen from the Cup Winners' Cup.

Downfall and recoveryEdit

Belenenses were relegated from the Primeira Liga for the first time in 1981–82, and have been relegated three other times since then.

21st centuryEdit

The 2005–06 season saw Belenenses finishing fourth from bottom, which would mean relegation for the team. However, the club won a subsequent appeal which sent Gil Vicente down instead. With this reprieve, the club played in the top level of Portuguese football once again. On 27 May 2007, Belenenses reached their first Taça de Portugal final since their 1989 triumph, but were defeated 1–0 by Sporting CP.[8]

Cabral Ferreira, who served as club president of Belenenses from 2005 until 2008, died on 26 February 2008 after a long illness.[9] Belenenses were relegated in 2010 to the Segunda Liga, but secured promotion back to the Primeira Liga in March 2013, their longest stint out of the top division.

During the 2014–15 season, Belenenses finished the championship in sixth place, thereby returning to European competition, qualifying for the 2015–16 UEFA Europa League.

They reached the group stage of the 2015–16 UEFA Europa League after eliminating IFK Göteborg (2–1 on aggregate) and Rheindorf Altach (1–0 on aggregate). They finished fourth and last in their group, recording a surprising 2–1 away win against Basel, but drawing 0–0 twice against Lech Poznań, losing the return match against Basel, and losing both matches to Fiorentina.

Club splitEdit

At the end of 2017–18 season, CF os Belenenses (Club) and Belenenses SAD went their separate ways, as the "Protocol on the use of Estádio do Restelo" ended and the SAD refused to negotiate a new contract with the Club. So from the 2018-19 season, Belenenses SAD (the professional team) play their Primeira Liga home games at Estádio Nacional, whereas CF os Belenenses registered an amateur team in 1ª Divisão Distrital de Lisboa, the equivalent to the Sixth Division (lowest Portuguese division), with the support of the majority of fans and club members.

As a consequence, Belenenses SAD was legally forbidden from using Belenenses' Logo and name and now uses a new logo[10]. In the first games of the season, the professional team saw home attendances of only a few hundred, whereas the new, amateur team saw home attendances of approximately 5,000, reversing a long decline in attendance figures.[11]

HonoursEdit

DomesticEdit

Winners (1): 1945–46
Winners (3): 1941–42, 1959–60, 1988–89
Runners-up (5): 1939–40, 1940–41, 1947–48, 1985–86, 2006–07
Runners-up (1): 1989
Winners (3): 1926–27, 1928–29, 1932–33
Runners-up (3): 1925–26, 1931–32, 1935–36
Winners (2): 1983–84, 2012–13
Winners (6): 1925–26, 1928–29, 1929–30, 1931–32, 1943–44, 1945–46

EuropeanEdit

Winners (1): 1975

League and cup historyEdit

Season Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Cup Europe Notes
1934–35 CL 4 14 8 2 4 45 20 18 quarter-final
1935–36 CL 4 14 7 3 4 28 22 17 final
1936–37 CL 2 14 11 1 2 46 17 23 quarter-final
1937–38 CL 5 14 5 0 9 29 28 10
1938–39 1D 4 14 6 1 7 38 29 13 quarter-final
1939–40 1D 3 18 11 3 4 58 21 25 final
1940–41 1D 3 14 9 1 4 59 22 19 final
1941–42 1D 3 22 12 6 4 66 32 30 winner
1942–43 1D 3 18 14 0 4 78 20 28 quarter-final
1943–44 1D 6 18 9 3 6 41 32 21 quarter-final
1944–45 1D 3 18 13 1 4 72 29 27 quarter-final
1945–46 1D 1 22 18 2 2 74 24 38 last 16 Only League title
1946–47 1D 4 26 14 5 7 66 31 33 not held
1947–48 1D 3 26 16 5 5 76 30 37 final
1948–49 1D 3 26 16 3 7 68 36 35 last 16
1949–50 1D 4 26 10 7 9 36 41 27 not held
1950–51 1D 9 26 10 4 12 45 48 24 semi-final
1951–52 1D 4 26 14 8 4 60 28 36
1952–53 1D 3 26 15 6 5 60 29 36
1953–54 1D 4 26 13 5 8 43 39 31 semi-final
1954–55 1D 2 26 17 5 4 63 28 39 LAT 4th place
1955–56 1D 3 26 16 5 5 67 25 37 semi-final
1956–57 1D 3 26 13 7 6 74 50 33
1957–58 1D 4 26 12 4 10 54 42 28
1958–59 1D 3 26 16 6 4 65 27 38
1959–60 1D 3 26 15 6 5 58 25 36 winner
1960–61 1D 5 26 12 4 10 45 37 28 semi-final
1961–62 1D 5 26 12 7 7 51 35 31 semi-final FC 1st round
1962–63 1D 4 26 16 4 6 47 30 36 semi-final FC 1st round
1963–64 1D 6 26 12 6 8 46 36 30 FC 2nd round
1964–65 1D 8 26 12 2 12 39 40 26 FC 1st round
1965–66 1D 7 26 9 7 10 28 29 25
1966–67 1D 11 26 7 6 13 26 34 20
1967–68 1D 7 26 10 5 11 38 40 25
1968–69 1D 8 26 8 10 8 31 33 26
1969–70 1D 7 26 9 5 12 23 34 23 semi-final
1970–71 1D 7 26 7 8 11 20 27 22
1971–72 1D 7 30 11 7 12 35 33 29 semi-final
1972–73 1D 2 30 14 12 4 53 30 40
1973–74 1D 5 30 17 6 7 56 34 40 UC 1st round
1974–75 1D 6 30 14 7 9 45 37 35 semi-final
1975–76 1D 3 30 16 8 6 45 28 40 IC GC
1976–77 1D 10 30 7 12 11 29 40 26 IC
UC
2nd Gr
1st round
1977–78 1D 5 30 14 8 8 25 21 36
1978–79 1D 8 30 10 9 11 47 43 29
1979–80 1D 5 30 13 8 9 33 38 34
1980–81 1D 11 30 8 10 12 24 39 26 semi-final
1981–82 1D 15 30 5 10 15 28 48 20 relegated
1982–83 2D.S 4 30 12 10 8 35 19 34
1983–84 2D.S 1 30 18 8 4 49 13 44 promoted
1984–85 1D 6 30 11 8 11 40 46 30
1985–86 1D 8 30 7 14 9 27 30 28 final
1986–87 1D 6 30 13 4 13 52 40 30
1987–88 1D 3 38 18 12 8 52 38 48 UC 1st round
1988–89 1D 7 38 13 14 11 44 35 40 winner UC 2nd round
1989–90 1D 6 34 16 4 14 32 33 36 semi-final CWC 1st round
1990–91 1D 19 38 10 9 19 27 38 29 relegated
1991–92 2H 2 34 19 10 5 53 25 48 promoted
1992–93 1D 7 34 11 12 11 42 40 34
1993–94 1D 13 34 12 6 16 39 51 30
1994–95 1D 12 34 10 7 17 30 39 27
1995–96 1D 6 34 14 9 1 53 33 51
1996–97 1D 13 34 10 10 14 37 50 40 last 32
1997–98 1D 18 34 5 9 20 22 52 24 last 64 relegated
1998–99 2H 2 34 17 10 7 55 28 61 promoted
1999–2000 1D 12 34 9 13 12 36 38 40 last 64
2000–01 1D 7 34 14 10 10 43 36 52 last 32
2001–02 1D 5 34 17 6 11 54 44 57 last 16
2002–03 1D 9 34 11 10 13 47 48 43 last 32 IC 2nd round
2003–04 1D 15 34 8 11 15 35 54 35 semi-final
2004–05 1D 9 34 13 7 14 38 34 46 quarter-final
2005–06 1D 15 34 11 6 17 40 42 39 last 64
2006–07 1D 5 30 15 4 11 36 29 49 final
2007–08 1D 8 30 11 10 9 35 33 40 last 64 UC 1st round 3 points deducted
2008–09 1D 15 30 5 9 16 28 52 24 last 32
2009–10 1D 15 30 4 11 15 23 44 23 last 16 relegated
2010–11 2H 13 30 8 11 11 33 36 35 last 64
2011–12 2H 5 30 10 11 9 34 32 41 last 16
2012–13 2H 1 42 29 7 6 75 41 94 semi-final promoted
2013–14 1D 14 30 6 10 14 19 33 28 last 64
2014–15 1D 6 34 12 12 10 34 35 48 quarter final
2015–16 1D 9 34 10 11 13 44 66 41 last 32 EL Group stage
2016–17 1D 14 34 9 9 16 27 45 36 last 64

CL=Campeonato da Liga (winners weren't considered Portuguese champions); 1D=First Division/League
2D=Second Division/League; 2H=Liga de Honra
CWC=Cup Winners' Cup; UC=UEFA Cup
FC=Fairs Cup; LAT=Latin Cup; IC=Intertoto Cup

European recordEdit

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Aggregate
1961–62 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 1R   Hibernian 1–3 3–3 4–6
1962–63 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 1R   Barcelona 1–1 1–1 2–21
1963–64 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 1R   Tresnjevka Zagreb 2–0 2–1 4–1
2R   Roma 0–1 1–2 1–3
1964–65 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 1R   Shelbourne 1–1 0–0 1–12
1973–74 UEFA Cup 1R   Wolverhampton Wanderers 0–2 1–2 1–4
1976–77 UEFA Cup 1R   Barcelona 2–2 2–3 4–5
1987–88 UEFA Cup 1R   Barcelona 1–0 0–2 1–2
1988–89 UEFA Cup 1R   Bayer Leverkusen 1–0 1–0 2–0
2R   Velež Mostar 0–0 0–0 0–03
1989–90 European Cup Winners' Cup 1R   Monaco 1–1 0–3 1–4
2007–08 UEFA Cup 1R   Bayern Munich 0–2 0–1 0–3
2015–16 UEFA Europa League 3Q   IFK Göteborg 2–1 0–0 2–1
PO   Rheindorf Altach 0–0 1–0 1–0
Group I   Basel 0–2 2–1 4th place
  Fiorentina 0–4 0–1
  Lech Poznań 0–0 0–0
Notes
  • 1R: First round
  • 2R: Second round
  • 3Q: Third qualifying round
  • PO: Play-off round

1 Barcelona progressed to the Second round after winning a play-off match 3–2.
2 Shelbourne progressed to the Second round after winning a play-off match 2–1.
3 Velež Mostar progressed to the Third round after winning a penalty shoot-out 4–3.

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

As of 31 March 2019

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1   GK Muriel
2   DF Gonçalo Tavares
4   MF Merlin Tandjigora
5   MF Eduardo (on loan from Internacional)
6   DF Vincent Sasso
7   FW Licá
8   FW Dálcio (on loan from Benfica B)
9   FW Tiago Caeiro
10   FW Diogo Viana
11   MF Matija Ljujić
12   DF Pierre Sagna
14   DF Luís Silva
17   FW Henrique Almeida (on loan from Grêmio)
19   FW Nicolás Vélez
No. Position Player
21   DF Zakarya Bergdich
23   DF Cleylton
24   DF Kiki
26   MF André Santos
37   DF Gonçalo Silva
39   GK Mika
44   DF Diogo Calila
47   MF Jonatan Lucca
50   FW Alhassane Keita
66   MF Nuno Coelho
93   FW Ousmane Dramé
98   FW Kikas
  FW Dieguinho

Out on loanEdit

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
67   DF Reinildo Mandava (at LOSC Lille until 30 June 2019)
  MF André Sousa (at Sporting de Gijón until 30 June 2019)
No. Position Player
  MF Ricardo Dias (at Académica de Coimbra until 30 June 2019)
  DF Nuno Tomás (at CSKA Sofia until 30 June 2019)

Former coachesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.ligaportugal.pt/oou/clube/20152016/liganos/106
  2. ^ Portugal – List of Champions
  3. ^ Portugal 1945–46
  4. ^ Real Madrid C.F. – Official Web Site – Real Madrid play 1,500th official clash at the Santiago Bernabeu[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ Portugal 1954–55
  6. ^ Portugal 1972–73
  7. ^ Portugal Cup Full Results 1938–1990
  8. ^ Portugal Cup 2006/07
  9. ^ "Passings: Morreu Cabral Ferreira". Jornal de Notícias. 28 February 2008. Retrieved 26 March 2008.
  10. ^ https://ionline.sapo.pt/638547
  11. ^ [1]
  12. ^ From 1922 to 1938, the Portuguese champion was determined in a knock-out competition called Campeonato de Portugal (Portuguese Championship). With the formation of the league, this competition later became the national cup.

External linksEdit