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Rui Jorge de Sousa Dias Macedo de Oliveira, OIH (born 27 March 1973), known as Rui Jorge, is a Portuguese retired footballer who played as a left back, and is the manager of the Portugal national under-21 team.

Rui Jorge
Personal information
Full name Rui Jorge de Sousa Dias Macedo de Oliveira
Date of birth (1973-03-27) 27 March 1973 (age 46)
Place of birth Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal
Height 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)
Playing position Left back
Club information
Current team
Portugal U21 (coach)
Youth career
1981–1991 Porto
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1991–1998 Porto 85 (2)
1991–1992Rio Ave (loan) 31 (2)
1998–2005 Sporting CP 192 (5)
2005–2006 Belenenses 15 (0)
Total 323 (9)
National team
1993–1994 Portugal U21 17 (0)
1994–2004 Portugal 45 (1)
Teams managed
2009 Belenenses
2010– Portugal U21
2016 Portugal U23
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

During a 15-year professional career he spent 14 seasons in Primeira Liga, mainly in representation of Porto and Sporting, playing 292 matches and scoring seven goals in the competition.

Rui Jorge appeared with Portugal at the 2002 World Cup and two European Championships.

Club careerEdit

Rui Jorge was born in Vila Nova de Gaia, Porto District. Having emerged through local FC Porto, he made his professional debuts with Rio Ave F.C. in the second division, returning to his first club in 1992 after one season. Never an undisputed starter with the former (only appearing in more than 20 games twice during his six-year spell) he did help the northern side to five Primeira Liga championships and three domestic cups.

In July 1998, Rui Jorge signed with Sporting CP, where he would remain for the following seven years, being first-choice during most of his stint and adding two more leagues to his trophy cabinet, with the double being conquered in 2002. In the 2005–06 campaign he played with another Lisbon team, C.F. Os Belenenses, subsequently retiring from the game – aged 33, with more than 400 official appearances – and joining his final club's youth coaching staff.

In May 2009, Rui Jorge was appointed Belenenses' head coach for the final two matches of the season, taking over Jaime Pacheco after a 0–5 home loss against S.C. Braga,[1] with the club eventually ranking second from bottom (being later reinstated). At the end of the campaign, he returned to the youth ranks.[2]

International careerEdit

Rui Jorge played for the Portugal under-21 side which lost the 1994 UEFA European Championship final to Italy (1–2) and the Olympic team who finished fourth at the 1996 Summer Olympics in the United States.[3] He also had 45 caps at full level, two while at Porto and 43 when with Sporting, and scored once in a 7–1 away win over Andorra on 1 September 2001.[4] His first game for the latter was a 0–0 draw with Norway on 20 April 1994, in a friendly match, and he represented his country at UEFA Euro 2000, the 2002 FIFA World Cup and Euro 2004.

Rui Jorge's participation at Euro 2004 on home soil was jeopardised when he tested positive in February that year for Budesonide, commercially known as Pulmicort. He said that the substance came from a medically recommended spray for his rhinitis.[5] His suspension was lifted in May, with the fault placed on Sporting for not notifying authorities of his medical exemption;[6] at the tournament, he was one of four players – three from defence – dropped by Luiz Felipe Scolari after the opening 2–1 loss to Greece,[7] and did not return for the remainder of the competition, which Portugal lost in the final to the same team.

On 19 November 2010, Rui Jorge replaced Oceano at the helm of the Portuguese under-21s.[8] He led them to the 2015 European Championships in the Czech Republic after ten wins in as many matches in the qualifying phase,[9] and coached them to the second place in the finals after a penalty shootout loss to Sweden.[10]

Rui Jorge coached the Portuguese at the 2016 Olympic tournament in Brazil, where they lost 4–0 to Germany in the quarter-finals.[11][12] He was also in charge for the 2017 edition of the under-21 continental tournament, which ended in group stage exit.[13] On 10 October 2017, six years after the last loss for that stage of the competition, he was on the bench as the team lost 1–3 in Bosnia and Herzegovina for the 2019 European Championship qualifiers.[14]

Career statisticsEdit

ClubEdit

[15][16]

Club Season League Cup Europe Other Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Rio Ave (loan) 1991–92 31 2 31 2
Porto 1992–93 8 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 13 0
1993–94 23 0 6 1 10 1 1 0 40 2
1994–95 15 0 3 0 5 0 1 0 24 0
1995–96 22 2 5 0 2 0 2 0 31 2
1996–97 11 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 16 0
1997–98 6 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 11 0
Total 85 2 18 1 26 1 6 0 135 4
Sporting 1998–99 26 2 1 0 0 0 27 2
1999–00 34 2 5 0 1 0 40 2
2000–01 32 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 44 0
2001–02 30 0 4 0 5 0 39 0
2002–03 22 1 2 0 3 0 1 0 28 1
2003–04 29 0 0 0 4 0 33 0
2004–05 19 0 1 0 13 0 33 0
Total 192 5 18 0 30 0 4 0 244 5
Belenenses 2005–06 15 0 0 0 15 0
Career total 323 9 36 1 56 1 10 0 425 11

International goalsEdit

Rui Jorge: International goals
Goal Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 1 September 2001 Camp d'Esports (Lleida), Lleida, Spain   Andorra 1–5 1–7 2002 World Cup qualification[17]

Managerial statisticsEdit

As of 5 September 2017
Team From To Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Belenenses 12 May 2009[1] 25 May 2009[2] 2 1 0 1 2 3 −1 050.00
Portugal U21 19 November 2010[8] Present 66 46 13 7 150 54 +96 069.70
Portugal U23 28 March 2016 13 August 2016 5 3 1 1 9 6 +3 060.00
Career totals 73 50 14 9 935 841 +94 068.49

Source: [18]

HonoursEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Rui Jorge: "Tinha de aceitar"" [Rui Jorge: «I had to accept»]. Record (in Portuguese). 12 May 2009. Retrieved 30 September 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Rui Jorge recusa convite para 2009/10" [Rui Jorge rejects invitation for 2009/10]. Record (in Portuguese). 25 May 2009. Retrieved 30 September 2017.
  3. ^ Rui JorgeFIFA competition record
  4. ^ "Andorra 1–7 Portugal: Gomes four". ESPN FC. 1 September 2001. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  5. ^ "Rui Jorge tests positive". UEFA. 23 April 2004. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  6. ^ "Jorge cleared for Euro 2004". BBC Sport. 17 May 2004. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  7. ^ "Scolari sees new Portugal". BBC Sport. 16 June 2004. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  8. ^ a b "Rui Jorge takes Portugal U21 reins". UEFA. 19 November 2010. Retrieved 30 September 2017.
  9. ^ Machado, Carlos (9 September 2014). "Portugal end group in perfect fashion". UEFA. Retrieved 17 November 2014.
  10. ^ Kell, Tom (30 June 2015). "Spot-on Sweden beat Portugal to win U21 EURO". UEFA. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
  11. ^ "Rui Jorge: Olympics are a special test". FIFA. 27 July 2016. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  12. ^ Dowley, Conor (13 August 2016). "Portugal vs. Germany 2016: Final score 4–0, Serge Gnabry leads another Olympic rout". SB Nation. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  13. ^ "Portugal vence Macedónia, mas falha objetivo das meias-finais" [Portugal beat Macedonia, but miss semi-finais goal] (in Portuguese). TSF. 23 June 2017. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  14. ^ "Bósnia-Portugal, 3–1: Primeira derrota em apuramentos em 6 anos" [Bosnia-Portugal, 3–1: First defeat in qualifiers in 6 years]. Record (in Portuguese). 10 October 2017. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  15. ^ Rui Jorge at ForaDeJogo  
  16. ^ "Rui Jorge". Footballdatabase. Retrieved 12 May 2015.
  17. ^ "Andorra-Portugal: Seleção lusa com excelentes recordações" [Andorra-Portugal: Lusitanian national team with excellent memories] (in Portuguese). SAPO. 5 October 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2018.
  18. ^ Rui Jorge coach profile at Soccerway

External linksEdit